Yehia Daaka

Summary

Affiliation: Duke University Medical Center
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Mitogenic action of LPA in prostate
    Yehia Daaka
    Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, DUMC 2607, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Biochim Biophys Acta 1582:265-9. 2002
  2. ncbi request reprint A role for the G12 family of heterotrimeric G proteins in prostate cancer invasion
    Patrick Kelly
    Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA
    J Biol Chem 281:26483-90. 2006
  3. ncbi request reprint Expression and function of lysophosphatidic acid LPA1 receptor in prostate cancer cells
    Rishu Guo
    Department of Surgery, Duke University of Medical Center, North Carolina 27710, USA
    Endocrinology 147:4883-92. 2006
  4. ncbi request reprint Lysophosphatidic acid promotes survival of androgen-insensitive prostate cancer PC3 cells via activation of NF-kappaB
    Ganesh V Raj
    Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA
    Prostate 61:105-13. 2004
  5. ncbi request reprint Bradykinin receptor subtype 1 expression and function in prostate cancer
    Jason S Taub
    Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA
    Cancer Res 63:2037-41. 2003
  6. ncbi request reprint Targeting Gbetagamma signaling to inhibit prostate tumor formation and growth
    Angela L Bookout
    Department of Surgery, Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA
    J Biol Chem 278:37569-73. 2003
  7. ncbi request reprint Androgen receptor activation by G(s) signaling in prostate cancer cells
    Elizabeth A Kasbohm
    Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA
    J Biol Chem 280:11583-9. 2005
  8. pmc Requirement for direct cross-talk between B1 and B2 kinin receptors for the proliferation of androgen-insensitive prostate cancer PC3 cells
    Liza Barki-Harrington
    Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Biochem J 371:581-7. 2003
  9. ncbi request reprint Interleukin 6 mediates the lysophosphatidic acid-regulated cross-talk between stromal and epithelial prostate cancer cells
    Perumal Sivashanmugam
    Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    J Biol Chem 279:21154-9. 2004
  10. ncbi request reprint G protein-coupled receptors provide survival signals in prostate cancer
    Charles W Yowell
    Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Clin Prostate Cancer 1:177-81. 2002

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications21

  1. ncbi request reprint Mitogenic action of LPA in prostate
    Yehia Daaka
    Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, DUMC 2607, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Biochim Biophys Acta 1582:265-9. 2002
    ..Finally, we present data demonstrating a correlation between the mitogenic effects of LPA and expression of the lp(A1) gene in the prostate cancer cells...
  2. ncbi request reprint A role for the G12 family of heterotrimeric G proteins in prostate cancer invasion
    Patrick Kelly
    Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA
    J Biol Chem 281:26483-90. 2006
    ..These observations identify the G12 family proteins as important regulators of prostate cancer invasion and suggest that these proteins may be targeted to limit invasion- and metastasis-induced prostate cancer patient mortality...
  3. ncbi request reprint Expression and function of lysophosphatidic acid LPA1 receptor in prostate cancer cells
    Rishu Guo
    Department of Surgery, Duke University of Medical Center, North Carolina 27710, USA
    Endocrinology 147:4883-92. 2006
    ..These results suggest the possible utility of LPA(1) as a drug target to interfere with progression of prostate cancer...
  4. ncbi request reprint Lysophosphatidic acid promotes survival of androgen-insensitive prostate cancer PC3 cells via activation of NF-kappaB
    Ganesh V Raj
    Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA
    Prostate 61:105-13. 2004
    ..In this study we examined ability of the lipid growth factor lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) ligand, to promote prostate cell survival...
  5. ncbi request reprint Bradykinin receptor subtype 1 expression and function in prostate cancer
    Jason S Taub
    Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA
    Cancer Res 63:2037-41. 2003
    ..These findings identify B1R as an early marker for pathological growth of the prostate and suggest its potential utility as a drug target effective for the treatment of prostate cancer...
  6. ncbi request reprint Targeting Gbetagamma signaling to inhibit prostate tumor formation and growth
    Angela L Bookout
    Department of Surgery, Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA
    J Biol Chem 278:37569-73. 2003
    ....
  7. ncbi request reprint Androgen receptor activation by G(s) signaling in prostate cancer cells
    Elizabeth A Kasbohm
    Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA
    J Biol Chem 280:11583-9. 2005
    ..These data suggest a role for G alpha(s) and PKA in the transactivation of AR in prostate cancer cells under the environment of reduced androgen levels...
  8. pmc Requirement for direct cross-talk between B1 and B2 kinin receptors for the proliferation of androgen-insensitive prostate cancer PC3 cells
    Liza Barki-Harrington
    Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Biochem J 371:581-7. 2003
    ..Selective inhibition of B1R, which is up-regulated in injured and cancerous tissue, may be beneficial for the treatment of advanced prostate cancer...
  9. ncbi request reprint Interleukin 6 mediates the lysophosphatidic acid-regulated cross-talk between stromal and epithelial prostate cancer cells
    Perumal Sivashanmugam
    Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    J Biol Chem 279:21154-9. 2004
    ..Our findings reveal that the LPA-regulated secretion of IL-6 is an important messenger linking stromal and epithelial prostate cells, which may be exploited for the effective treatment of patients with advanced prostate cancer...
  10. ncbi request reprint G protein-coupled receptors provide survival signals in prostate cancer
    Charles W Yowell
    Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Clin Prostate Cancer 1:177-81. 2002
    ..Prostate-expressed G protein- coupled receptors and their downstream effectors may prove to be effective targets in the treatment of advanced prostate cancer...
  11. pmc The G12 family of heterotrimeric G proteins promotes breast cancer invasion and metastasis
    Patrick Kelly
    Department Pharmacology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103:8173-8. 2006
    ....
  12. pmc Nitric oxide regulates endocytosis by S-nitrosylation of dynamin
    Gaofeng Wang
    Department of Surgery, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103:1295-300. 2006
    ....
  13. ncbi request reprint Regulation of beta-adrenergic receptor signaling by S-nitrosylation of G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2
    Erin J Whalen
    Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Cell 129:511-22. 2007
    ..Cys340 of GRK2 is identified as a principal locus of inhibition by S-nitrosylation. Our studies thus reveal a central molecular mechanism through which GPCR signaling is regulated...
  14. ncbi request reprint Guanosine phosphate binding protein coupled receptors in prostate cancer: a review
    Ganesh V Raj
    Departments of Surgery and Pharmacology Cancer Biology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA
    J Urol 167:1458-63. 2002
    ..We examined the role of a family of extracellular signal regulators, namely the guanosine phosphate binding (G) protein coupled receptor (GPCR) family, in prostate cancer...
  15. ncbi request reprint Induction of human dendritic cell maturation using transfection with RNA encoding a dominant positive toll-like receptor 4
    Robin M Cisco
    Department of Surgery, Duke University and Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Centers, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    J Immunol 172:7162-8. 2004
    ....
  16. ncbi request reprint Regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor internalization by G protein-coupled receptors
    Jihee Kim
    Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham North Carolina 27710, USA
    Biochemistry 42:2887-94. 2003
    ..Thus, G protein-coupled receptors can control the function of the EGFR by regulating its endocytosis...
  17. ncbi request reprint G proteins in cancer: the prostate cancer paradigm
    Yehia Daaka
    Department of Surgery and Pharmacology and Cancer Biology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Sci STKE 2004:re2. 2004
    ..Activated GPCRs may also exert their mitogenic effects in the prostate by activating the androgen receptor...
  18. ncbi request reprint Lysophosphatidic acid-regulated mitogenic ERK signaling in androgen-insensitive prostate cancer PC-3 cells
    Pao F Kue
    Department of Surgery Urology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Int J Cancer 102:572-9. 2002
    ..Together, our data show that LPA and EGF cooperate to induce mitogenic signaling in prostate cancer cells in an MMP-regulated activation of the ERK pathway...
  19. doi request reprint 2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)-1,1-dichloroethylene stimulates androgen independence in prostate cancer cells through combinatorial activation of mutant androgen receptor and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways
    Supriya Shah
    Kimmel Cancer Center and Department of Cancer, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA
    Mol Cancer Res 6:1507-20. 2008
    ....
  20. ncbi request reprint Agonist-stimulated reactive oxygen species formation regulates beta2-adrenergic receptor signal transduction
    Nader H Moniri
    Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Mercer University, 3001 Mercer University Drive, Atlanta, GA 30341, United States
    Biochem Pharmacol 74:64-73. 2007
    ....
  21. pmc Androgens transduce the G alphas-mediated activation of protein kinase A in prostate cells
    Gargi Bagchi
    Department of Pathology, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, GA 30912, USA
    Cancer Res 68:3225-31. 2008
    ..The inhibition of PKA activation, together with standard AR-targeted therapies, may be more efficacious for treatment of patients with prostate cancer...