J S Clark

Summary

Affiliation: Duke University Medical Center
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint A future for models and data in environmental science
    James S Clark
    Nicholas School of the Environment and Department of Biology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Trends Ecol Evol 21:375-80. 2006
  2. ncbi request reprint Resolving the biodiversity paradox
    James S Clark
    Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Ecol Lett 10:647-59; discussion 659-62. 2007
  3. doi request reprint The coherence problem with the Unified Neutral Theory of Biodiversity
    James S Clark
    Nicholas School of the Environment, Department of Biology, Department of Statistical Science, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Trends Ecol Evol 27:198-202. 2012
  4. pmc Evidence from individual inference for high-dimensional coexistence: long-term experiments on recruitment response
    James S Clark
    Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 7:e30050. 2012
  5. doi request reprint Individual-scale variation, species-scale differences: inference needed to understand diversity
    James S Clark
    Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Ecol Lett 14:1273-87. 2011
  6. ncbi request reprint Inferential ecosystem models, from network data to prediction
    James S Clark
    Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708, USA
    Ecol Appl 21:1523-36. 2011
  7. doi request reprint Individuals and the variation needed for high species diversity in forest trees
    James S Clark
    Nicholas School of the Environment, Department of Biology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Science 327:1129-32. 2010
  8. doi request reprint Beyond neutral science
    James S Clark
    Nicholas School of the Environment, Department of Biology and Department of Statistical Science, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Trends Ecol Evol 24:8-15. 2009
  9. ncbi request reprint Tree growth inference and prediction from diameter censuses and ring widths
    James S Clark
    Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708, USA
    Ecol Appl 17:1942-53. 2007
  10. ncbi request reprint Ecological forecasts: an emerging imperative
    J S Clark
    Department of Biology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 USA
    Science 293:657-60. 2001

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications26

  1. ncbi request reprint A future for models and data in environmental science
    James S Clark
    Nicholas School of the Environment and Department of Biology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Trends Ecol Evol 21:375-80. 2006
    ..With this potential come new challenges, including some that are specific and technical and others that are general and will involve reexamination of the role of inference and prediction...
  2. ncbi request reprint Resolving the biodiversity paradox
    James S Clark
    Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Ecol Lett 10:647-59; discussion 659-62. 2007
    ..This mechanism can explain coexistence of species that would not occur with simple, low-dimensional tradeoff scenarios...
  3. doi request reprint The coherence problem with the Unified Neutral Theory of Biodiversity
    James S Clark
    Nicholas School of the Environment, Department of Biology, Department of Statistical Science, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Trends Ecol Evol 27:198-202. 2012
    ..Models lacking explicit species can make useful predictions, but this does not support neutral theory. I provide s suggestions that could help reduce confusion generated by the debate...
  4. pmc Evidence from individual inference for high-dimensional coexistence: long-term experiments on recruitment response
    James S Clark
    Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 7:e30050. 2012
    ..To understand how this pattern of variation is related to niche variables, we analyzed responses to canopy gaps, long viewed as a key variable responsible for species coexistence...
  5. doi request reprint Individual-scale variation, species-scale differences: inference needed to understand diversity
    James S Clark
    Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Ecol Lett 14:1273-87. 2011
    ..We show how to identify when aggregation is the problem, where it has caused controversy, and propose three ways to address it...
  6. ncbi request reprint Inferential ecosystem models, from network data to prediction
    James S Clark
    Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708, USA
    Ecol Appl 21:1523-36. 2011
    ..Our examples involve soil moisture and sap flux, but we discuss broader application of the approach, including its implications for network design...
  7. doi request reprint Individuals and the variation needed for high species diversity in forest trees
    James S Clark
    Nicholas School of the Environment, Department of Biology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Science 327:1129-32. 2010
    ..Results are consistent with theory predicting that coexistence depends on competition being stronger within than between species, shown here by analysis of individual-level responses to environmental fluctuation...
  8. doi request reprint Beyond neutral science
    James S Clark
    Nicholas School of the Environment, Department of Biology and Department of Statistical Science, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Trends Ecol Evol 24:8-15. 2009
    ..Finally, I suggest that the dramatic shift in ecological research to focus on neutrality could have a cost in terms of scientific understanding and relevance to real biodiversity threats...
  9. ncbi request reprint Tree growth inference and prediction from diameter censuses and ring widths
    James S Clark
    Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708, USA
    Ecol Appl 17:1942-53. 2007
    ..An example involving multiple species and multiple stands with tree-ring data and up to 14 years of tree census data illustrates how different levels of information at the tree and stand level contribute to inference and prediction...
  10. ncbi request reprint Ecological forecasts: an emerging imperative
    J S Clark
    Department of Biology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 USA
    Science 293:657-60. 2001
    ..Interdisciplinary linkages are necessary because of the climate and societal controls on ecosystems, the feedbacks involving social change, and the decision-making relevance of forecasts...
  11. ncbi request reprint Stability of forest biodiversity
    James S Clark
    Center on Global Change, Biology, and Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708, USA
    Nature 423:635-8. 2003
    ..By contrast with the neutral prediction of increasing variance among sites over time, we show that variances in post-Glacial tree abundances among sites stabilize rapidly, and abundances remain coherent over broad geographical scales...
  12. pmc Individual-scale inference to anticipate climate-change vulnerability of biodiversity
    James S Clark
    Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 367:236-46. 2012
    ..However, by aggregating in specific ways (over individuals, years, and other input variables), we provide ways to summarize and rank species in terms of their risks from climate change...
  13. doi request reprint Estimating seed and pollen movement in a monoecious plant: a hierarchical Bayesian approach integrating genetic and ecological data
    Emily V Moran
    NIMBioS, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 1527, USA
    Mol Ecol 20:1248-62. 2011
    ..9.3 m), suggesting that, under some circumstances, oaks may be less dispersal-limited than is commonly thought, with a greater potential for range shifts in response to climate change...
  14. ncbi request reprint Predicting biodiversity change: outside the climate envelope, beyond the species-area curve
    Ines Ibanez
    University Program in Ecology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 90338, USA
    Ecology 87:1896-906. 2006
    ....
  15. doi request reprint A predictive framework to understand forest responses to global change
    Sean M McMahon
    Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708, USA
    Ann N Y Acad Sci 1162:221-36. 2009
    ....
  16. doi request reprint Understanding movement data and movement processes: current and emerging directions
    Robert S Schick
    Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 0328, USA
    Ecol Lett 11:1338-50. 2008
    ..This model moves away from traditional random walks, and instead focuses inference on how moving animals with complex behavior interact with their landscape and make choices about its suitability...
  17. ncbi request reprint Rising CO2 levels and the fecundity of forest trees
    S L LaDeau
    Department of Biology and University Program in Ecology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Science 292:95-8. 2001
    ..This reproductive response to future increases in atmospheric CO2 concentration is expected to change loblolly dispersal and recruitment patterns...
  18. ncbi request reprint Evaluating the sources of potential migrant species: implications under climate change
    Ines Ibanez
    University Program in Ecology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 90338, USA
    Ecol Appl 18:1664-78. 2008
    ....
  19. pmc Fire cycles in North American interior grasslands and their relation to prairie drought
    K J Brown
    Department of Biology, Duke University, P O Box 90338, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102:8865-70. 2005
    ..Accordingly, the effects of global warming from increasing greenhouse gases will be superimposed on this natural variability of drought...
  20. ncbi request reprint Density-dependent mortality and the latitudinal gradient in species diversity
    Janneke Hille Ris Lambers
    Biology Department, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708, USA
    Nature 417:732-5. 2002
    ..Thus, unless the strength of density-dependent mortality varies with latitude, this mechanism is not likely to explain the high diversity of tropical forests...
  21. doi request reprint Predicting population survival under future climate change: density dependence, drought and extraction in an insular bighorn sheep
    Fernando Colchero
    Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, Box 90328, Durham, NC 27708 USA
    J Anim Ecol 78:666-73. 2009
    ..Current climate change scenarios and their underlying uncertainty make studies such as this one crucial for understanding the dynamics of ungulate populations and their conservation...
  22. pmc Biomass and toxicity responses of poison ivy (Toxicodendron radicans) to elevated atmospheric CO2
    Jacqueline E Mohan
    Department of Biology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103:9086-9. 2006
    ..Our results indicate that Toxicodendron taxa will become more abundant and more "toxic" in the future, potentially affecting global forest dynamics and human health...
  23. ncbi request reprint Long-term CO2 enrichment of a forest ecosystem: implications for forest regeneration and succession
    Jacqueline E Mohan
    Duke University, Graduate Program in Ecology, and Department of Biology, Durham, North Carolina 27708, USA
    Ecol Appl 17:1198-212. 2007
    ..Our data suggest a small CO2 fertilization effect on tree productivity, and the possibility of reduced carbon accumulation rates relative to today's forests due to changes in species composition...
  24. ncbi request reprint Does predation contribute to tree diversity?
    Brian Beckage
    Department of Botany, University of Vermont, Marsh Life Science Building, Burlington, VT 05405, USA
    Oecologia 143:458-69. 2005
    ..rubra (17% of sites). Tradeoffs between seedling performance and fecundity may promote the diversity of seedling regeneration by increasing the probability of inferior competitors capturing regeneration sites...
  25. ncbi request reprint The next 20 years of ecology and evolution
    Andrew F Read
    Trends Ecol Evol 21:354-5. 2006
  26. ncbi request reprint The past 20 years of ecology and evolution
    Andrew F Read
    Trends Ecol Evol 21:287. 2006