Rebecca H Buckley

Summary

Affiliation: Duke University Medical Center
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Epstein-Barr-associated leiomyomatosis and T-cell chimerism after haploidentical bone marrow transplantation for severe combined immunodeficiency disease
    Srilatha Atluri
    Department of Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA
    J Pediatr Hematol Oncol 29:166-72. 2007
  2. pmc Long-term outcome of non-ablative booster BMT in patients with SCID
    C L Teigland
    Departments of Pediatrics and Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Bone Marrow Transplant 48:1050-5. 2013
  3. pmc Post-transplantation B cell function in different molecular types of SCID
    Rebecca H Buckley
    Department of Pediatrics, Duke University Medical Center, Box 2898, 363 Jones Building, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    J Clin Immunol 33:96-110. 2013
  4. pmc The long quest for neonatal screening for severe combined immunodeficiency
    Rebecca H Buckley
    Departments of Pediatrics and Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    J Allergy Clin Immunol 129:597-604; quiz 605-6. 2012
  5. pmc Transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells in human severe combined immunodeficiency: longterm outcomes
    Rebecca H Buckley
    Departments of Pediatrics and Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, Box 2898 or 363 Jones Building, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Immunol Res 49:25-43. 2011
  6. ncbi request reprint Treatment options for genetically determined immunodeficiency
    Rebecca H Buckley
    Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Lancet 361:541-2. 2003
  7. ncbi request reprint Molecular defects in human severe combined immunodeficiency and approaches to immune reconstitution
    Rebecca H Buckley
    Department of Pediatrics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA
    Annu Rev Immunol 22:625-55. 2004
  8. pmc B-cell function in severe combined immunodeficiency after stem cell or gene therapy: a review
    Rebecca H Buckley
    Departments of Pediatrics and Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA
    J Allergy Clin Immunol 125:790-7. 2010
  9. ncbi request reprint Gene therapy for SCID--a complication after remarkable progress
    Rebecca H Buckley
    Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA
    Lancet 360:1185-6. 2002
  10. ncbi request reprint Primary immunodeficiency diseases: dissectors of the immune system
    Rebecca H Buckley
    Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Immunol Rev 185:206-19. 2002

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications40

  1. ncbi request reprint Epstein-Barr-associated leiomyomatosis and T-cell chimerism after haploidentical bone marrow transplantation for severe combined immunodeficiency disease
    Srilatha Atluri
    Department of Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA
    J Pediatr Hematol Oncol 29:166-72. 2007
    ..The clinical course of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated smooth muscle tumors is variable and there are no reports in patients with mixed T-cell chimerism after bone marrow transplantation (BMT)...
  2. pmc Long-term outcome of non-ablative booster BMT in patients with SCID
    C L Teigland
    Departments of Pediatrics and Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Bone Marrow Transplant 48:1050-5. 2013
    ..A majority of the patients alive today have normal or adequate T-cell function and are healthy. Nonablative booster BMT can be lifesaving for SCID. ..
  3. pmc Post-transplantation B cell function in different molecular types of SCID
    Rebecca H Buckley
    Department of Pediatrics, Duke University Medical Center, Box 2898, 363 Jones Building, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    J Clin Immunol 33:96-110. 2013
    ..However, the development of B cell function has been more problematic. We report here results of analyses of B cell function in 125 SCID recipients prior to and long-term after non-ablative BMT, according to their molecular type...
  4. pmc The long quest for neonatal screening for severe combined immunodeficiency
    Rebecca H Buckley
    Departments of Pediatrics and Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    J Allergy Clin Immunol 129:597-604; quiz 605-6. 2012
    ..Even more important will be their roles in establishing accurate diagnoses for infants with positive screen results and in ensuring that they are given the best possible treatment...
  5. pmc Transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells in human severe combined immunodeficiency: longterm outcomes
    Rebecca H Buckley
    Departments of Pediatrics and Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, Box 2898 or 363 Jones Building, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Immunol Res 49:25-43. 2011
    ..3 years and reviews published reports of longterm outcomes of transplants in SCID performed at other centers...
  6. ncbi request reprint Treatment options for genetically determined immunodeficiency
    Rebecca H Buckley
    Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Lancet 361:541-2. 2003
  7. ncbi request reprint Molecular defects in human severe combined immunodeficiency and approaches to immune reconstitution
    Rebecca H Buckley
    Department of Pediatrics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA
    Annu Rev Immunol 22:625-55. 2004
    ..Gene therapy was highly successful in nine infants with X-linked SCID, but the trials have been placed on hold due to the development of a leukemic process in two of the children because of insertional oncogenesis...
  8. pmc B-cell function in severe combined immunodeficiency after stem cell or gene therapy: a review
    Rebecca H Buckley
    Departments of Pediatrics and Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA
    J Allergy Clin Immunol 125:790-7. 2010
    ....
  9. ncbi request reprint Gene therapy for SCID--a complication after remarkable progress
    Rebecca H Buckley
    Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA
    Lancet 360:1185-6. 2002
  10. ncbi request reprint Primary immunodeficiency diseases: dissectors of the immune system
    Rebecca H Buckley
    Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Immunol Rev 185:206-19. 2002
    ..Finally, the past 3 years have witnessed the first truly successful gene therapy. The impressive results in X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency offer hope that this approach can be extended to many more diseases in the future...
  11. ncbi request reprint Immunoglobulin G subclass deficiency: fact or fancy?
    Rebecca H Buckley
    Pediatrics Allergy Immunology, Duke University School of Medicine, Box 2898, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2:356-60. 2002
    ..Such assays provide no information about the patient's capacity to produce specific antibodies to protein, polysaccharide, or viral antigens...
  12. pmc The multiple causes of human SCID
    Rebecca H Buckley
    Department of Pediatrics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA
    J Clin Invest 114:1409-11. 2004
    ..In this issue of the JCI, a report describes how complete deficiency of the CD3epsilon chain of the T cell antigen receptor/CD3 complex causes human SCID...
  13. pmc Variable phenotypic expression of mutations in genes of the immune system
    Rebecca H Buckley
    Department of Pediatrics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA
    J Clin Invest 115:2974-6. 2005
    ..describe a third phenotype for mutations in recombination activating gene 1 (RAG1), in addition to the already known phenotypes of SCID and Omenn syndrome (see the related article beginning on page 3291)...
  14. ncbi request reprint Primary immunodeficiency or not? Making the correct diagnosis
    Rebecca H Buckley
    Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    J Allergy Clin Immunol 117:756-8. 2006
    ..Had the physicians chosen tests of immune function rather than relying on immunoglobulin levels or cell counts, they would have arrived at the true diagnoses...
  15. ncbi request reprint Advances in the understanding and treatment of human severe combined immunodeficiency
    R H Buckley
    Department of Pediatrics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Immunol Res 22:237-51. 2000
    ..5 mo of life, making early diagnosis crucial. Recently, gene therapy has also been successful in infants with X-linked SCID...
  16. ncbi request reprint Pulmonary complications of primary immunodeficiencies
    Rebecca H Buckley
    Departments of Pediatrics and Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Paediatr Respir Rev 5:S225-33. 2004
    ..Finally, advances in treatment of the underlying diseases as well as their infectious complications will be covered...
  17. pmc Thymic output, T-cell diversity, and T-cell function in long-term human SCID chimeras
    MARCELLA SARZOTTI-KELSOE
    Departments of Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Blood 114:1445-53. 2009
    ....
  18. ncbi request reprint T cell repertoire development in humans with SCID after nonablative allogeneic marrow transplantation
    Marcella Sarzotti
    Department of Immunology, Medicine, and Pediatrics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    J Immunol 170:2711-8. 2003
    ..The TCR diversity positively correlates in these patients with TREC levels...
  19. ncbi request reprint Unusual clinical and immunologic manifestations of transplacentally acquired maternal T cells in severe combined immunodeficiency
    Kricia Palmer
    Division of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    J Allergy Clin Immunol 120:423-8. 2007
    ..We present evidence that these cells can cause allograft rejection and immune cytopenias...
  20. pmc T-B+NK+ severe combined immunodeficiency caused by complete deficiency of the CD3zeta subunit of the T-cell antigen receptor complex
    Joseph L Roberts
    Department of Pediatrics and Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Blood 109:3198-206. 2007
    ..Taken together, these findings provide the first demonstration that complete CD3zeta deficiency in humans can cause SCID by preventing normal TCR assembly and surface expression...
  21. doi request reprint Why newborn screening for severe combined immunodeficiency is essential: a case report
    Mehdi M Adeli
    Division of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA
    Pediatrics 126:e465-9. 2010
    ..Recognition of the characteristic lymphopenia of SCID can facilitate early diagnosis...
  22. ncbi request reprint Complete DiGeorge syndrome: development of rash, lymphadenopathy, and oligoclonal T cells in 5 cases
    M Louise Markert
    Department of Pediatrics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    J Allergy Clin Immunol 113:734-41. 2004
    ..T-cell counts and function varied greatly in each patient. Initial laboratory testing did not suggest athymia in these patients...
  23. ncbi request reprint Janus kinase 3 (JAK3) deficiency: clinical, immunologic, and molecular analyses of 10 patients and outcomes of stem cell transplantation
    Joseph L Roberts
    Department of Pediatrics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Blood 103:2009-18. 2004
    ..Hence, bone marrow transplantation is an effective means for reconstitution of T-cell immunity in this defect but is less successful for restoration of B-cell and NK cell functions...
  24. pmc Long-term clinical outcome of patients with severe combined immunodeficiency who received related donor bone marrow transplants without pretransplant chemotherapy or post-transplant GVHD prophylaxis
    Mary Dell Railey
    Department of Pediatrics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    J Pediatr 155:834-840.e1. 2009
    ..Only 16 (10%) had HLA-identical donors...
  25. ncbi request reprint Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for severe combined immunodeficiency in the neonatal period leads to superior thymic output and improved survival
    Laurie A Myers
    Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Blood 99:872-8. 2002
    ..An improved outcome for this otherwise fatal syndrome could be achieved with newborn screening for lymphopenia so that transplantation could be performed under favorable thymopoietic conditions...
  26. ncbi request reprint Primary cellular immunodeficiencies
    Rebecca H Buckley
    Division of Allergy and Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    J Allergy Clin Immunol 109:747-57. 2002
    ..Fully defining the molecular defects of such patients is also essential for genetic counseling of family members and prenatal diagnosis...
  27. pmc Transplantation immunology: solid organ and bone marrow
    Javier Chinen
    Department of Pediatrics, Allergy Immunology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, USA
    J Allergy Clin Immunol 125:S324-35. 2010
    ....
  28. ncbi request reprint The effect of natural killer cell killer Ig-like receptor alloreactivity on the outcome of bone marrow stem cell transplantation for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID)
    M D Keller
    Division of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA
    J Clin Immunol 27:109-16. 2007
    ..This study suggests that inhibitory KIR/HLA interactions do not play a significant role in bone marrow transplantation for SCID...
  29. ncbi request reprint Abnormal development of thymic dendritic and epithelial cells in human X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency
    Laura P Hale
    Department of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Clin Immunol 110:63-70. 2004
    ..These histopathologic findings indicate that in addition to T cells, thymic DC development and differentiation of TE cells are also abnormal in X-SCID...
  30. pmc The long and the short of telomeres in bone marrow recipient SCID patients
    MARCELLA SARZOTTI-KELSOE
    Department of Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Immunol Res 49:44-8. 2011
    ..Our study of seven SCID patients, following successful bone marrow transplantation, demonstrates that the patients' peripheral T cells did not exhibit greater than normal telomere shortening...
  31. ncbi request reprint American Pediatric Society Presidential Address 2000: reflections on the 20th and 21st centuries
    Rebecca H Buckley
    Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA
    Pediatr Res 51:119-23. 2002
  32. ncbi request reprint Transplantation of thymus tissue in complete DiGeorge syndrome
    M L Markert
    Department of Pediatrics, Duke Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    N Engl J Med 341:1180-9. 1999
    ..The DiGeorge syndrome is a congenital disorder that affects the heart, parathyroid glands, and thymus. In complete DiGeorge syndrome, patients have severely reduced T-cell function...
  33. ncbi request reprint Successful formation of a chimeric human thymus allograft following transplantation of cultured postnatal human thymus
    M L Markert
    Department of Pediatrics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    J Immunol 158:998-1005. 1997
    ....
  34. ncbi request reprint Thymic function after hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation for the treatment of severe combined immunodeficiency
    D D Patel
    Department of Medicine, Human Vaccine Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    N Engl J Med 342:1325-32. 2000
    ..The role of the thymus in this process is unknown...
  35. pmc CD45-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency caused by uniparental disomy
    Joseph L Roberts
    Department of Pediatrics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 109:10456-61. 2012
    ..Evaluation for alterations in other genes affected by UPD should also be considered in such cases...
  36. ncbi request reprint A historical review of bone marrow transplantation for immunodeficiencies
    Rebecca H Buckley
    Departments of Pediatrics and Immunology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    J Allergy Clin Immunol 113:793-800. 2004
  37. ncbi request reprint 27. Transplantation immunology: organ and bone marrow
    Rebecca H Buckley
    Department of Pediatrics, Allergy Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, 362 Jones Building Campus Box 2898, Durham, NC 27710 0001, USA
    J Allergy Clin Immunol 111:S733-44. 2003
    ..The major obstacle to the performance of solid organ transplantation currently is the shortage of donor organs...
  38. ncbi request reprint Comparison of the efficacy of IGIV-C, 10% (caprylate/chromatography) and IGIV-SD, 10% as replacement therapy in primary immune deficiency. A randomized double-blind trial
    Chaim M Roifman
    Division of Immunology Allergy, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada M5G 1X8
    Int Immunopharmacol 3:1325-33. 2003
    ..No evidence of viral transmission was observed. IGIV-C appears to be superior to IGIV-SD in preventing validated sinopulmonary infections, especially acute sinusitis, in patients with PID...
  39. ncbi request reprint A novel mutation in IFN-gamma receptor 2 with dominant negative activity: biological consequences of homozygous and heterozygous states
    Sergio D Rosenzweig
    Laboratory of Host Defenses, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    J Immunol 173:4000-8. 2004
    ..The mutant construct 791delG exerts dominant negative effects on IFN-gamma signaling without cell surface display, suggesting that it is acting on pathways other than those involved in cell surface recognition of ligand...
  40. ncbi request reprint Jak3 and the pathogenesis of severe combined immunodeficiency
    JOHN J O'SHEA
    Molecular Immunology and Inflammation Branch, National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, MSC 1820, 10 Center Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Mol Immunol 41:727-37. 2004
    ..Further study of Jak3 will hopefully provide insights into the clinical treatment of patients suffering from immune-mediated diseases...