ELIZABETH BRANNON

Summary

Affiliation: Duke University Medical Center
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Re-visiting the competence/performance debate in the acquisition of the counting principles
    Mathieu Le Corre
    Harvard University, USA
    Cogn Psychol 52:130-69. 2006
  2. pmc Crossing the divide: infants discriminate small from large numerosities
    Sara Cordes
    Duke University Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Dev Psychol 45:1583-94. 2009
  3. ncbi request reprint Numerical subtraction in the pigeon: evidence for a linear subjective number scale
    E M Brannon
    Department of Psychology, Experimental, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 0999, USA
    Psychol Sci 12:238-43. 2001
  4. pmc Temporal discrimination increases in precision over development and parallels the development of numerosity discrimination
    Elizabeth M Brannon
    Center for Cognitive Neuroscience and Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Dev Sci 10:770-7. 2007
  5. pmc The development of area discrimination and its implications for number representation in infancy
    Elizabeth M Brannon
    Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Dev Sci 9:F59-64. 2006
  6. ncbi request reprint The role of reference points in ordinal numerical comparisons by rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta)
    Elizabeth M Brannon
    Center for Cognitive Neuroscience and Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    J Exp Psychol Anim Behav Process 32:120-34. 2006
  7. pmc Electrophysiological measures of time processing in infant and adult brains: Weber's Law holds
    Elizabeth M Brannon
    Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    J Cogn Neurosci 20:193-203. 2008
  8. pmc The representation of numerical magnitude
    Elizabeth M Brannon
    Box 90999, LSRC, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Curr Opin Neurobiol 16:222-9. 2006
  9. pmc The independence of language and mathematical reasoning
    Elizabeth M Brannon
    Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences and Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 0999, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102:3177-8. 2005
  10. ncbi request reprint The development of ordinal numerical knowledge in infancy
    Elizabeth M Brannon
    Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Duke University, Box 90999, Durham, NC 27708 0999, USA
    Cognition 83:223-40. 2002

Research Grants

  1. Investigation of numerical abilities in infants with ERP
    ELIZABETH BRANNON; Fiscal Year: 2003
  2. Representation of number in infancy
    Elizabeth M Brannon; Fiscal Year: 2010
  3. Number Representation in Primates
    ELIZABETH BRANNON; Fiscal Year: 2009
  4. Number Representation in Primates
    ELIZABETH BRANNON; Fiscal Year: 2007
  5. Representation of number in infancy
    ELIZABETH BRANNON; Fiscal Year: 2007
  6. Number Representation in Primates
    Elizabeth M Brannon; Fiscal Year: 2010

Detail Information

Publications47

  1. ncbi request reprint Re-visiting the competence/performance debate in the acquisition of the counting principles
    Mathieu Le Corre
    Harvard University, USA
    Cogn Psychol 52:130-69. 2006
    ..Therefore, our results are consistent with a growing body of evidence that shows that the count list as a representation of the positive integers transcends pre-verbal representations of number...
  2. pmc Crossing the divide: infants discriminate small from large numerosities
    Sara Cordes
    Duke University Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Dev Psychol 45:1583-94. 2009
    ..The implications of these results are discussed in light of current theories of number representation...
  3. ncbi request reprint Numerical subtraction in the pigeon: evidence for a linear subjective number scale
    E M Brannon
    Department of Psychology, Experimental, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 0999, USA
    Psychol Sci 12:238-43. 2001
    ..In our adaptation, pigeons were required to compare a constant number with the number remaining after a numerical subtraction. Our results indicate that subjective number is linearly, not logarithmically, related to objective number...
  4. pmc Temporal discrimination increases in precision over development and parallels the development of numerosity discrimination
    Elizabeth M Brannon
    Center for Cognitive Neuroscience and Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Dev Sci 10:770-7. 2007
    ..We discuss the potential implications of the fact that temporal discrimination follows the same developmental progression that has been previously observed for number discrimination in infancy (Lipton & Spelke, 2003)...
  5. pmc The development of area discrimination and its implications for number representation in infancy
    Elizabeth M Brannon
    Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Dev Sci 9:F59-64. 2006
    ..Results suggest that Weber's Law holds for area discriminations in infancy and also reveal that at 6 months of age infants are equally sensitive to number, time and area...
  6. ncbi request reprint The role of reference points in ordinal numerical comparisons by rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta)
    Elizabeth M Brannon
    Center for Cognitive Neuroscience and Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    J Exp Psychol Anim Behav Process 32:120-34. 2006
    ....
  7. pmc Electrophysiological measures of time processing in infant and adult brains: Weber's Law holds
    Elizabeth M Brannon
    Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    J Cogn Neurosci 20:193-203. 2008
    ..Moreover, when absolute values were varied and ratio was held constant, the mismatch negativity did not vary...
  8. pmc The representation of numerical magnitude
    Elizabeth M Brannon
    Box 90999, LSRC, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Curr Opin Neurobiol 16:222-9. 2006
    ..An important picture emerging from this research is that adult humans share with non-human animals a system for representing number as language-independent mental magnitudes and that this system emerges early in development...
  9. pmc The independence of language and mathematical reasoning
    Elizabeth M Brannon
    Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences and Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 0999, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102:3177-8. 2005
  10. ncbi request reprint The development of ordinal numerical knowledge in infancy
    Elizabeth M Brannon
    Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Duke University, Box 90999, Durham, NC 27708 0999, USA
    Cognition 83:223-40. 2002
    ..These data raise many questions about how infants represent number and what happens between 9 and 11 months to support ordinal numerical judgments...
  11. ncbi request reprint Timing in the baby brain
    Elizabeth M Brannon
    Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Duke University, Box 90999, Durham, NC 27708 0999, USA
    Brain Res Cogn Brain Res 21:227-33. 2004
    ..These results suggest that the 10-month-old infant brain has already developed some of the same mechanisms as adults for detecting deviations in the timing of stimulus events...
  12. ncbi request reprint The development of ordinal numerical competence in young children
    E M Brannon
    Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 0999, USA
    Cogn Psychol 43:53-81. 2001
    ..Number may become a salient dimension as children begin to learn to count. An analog magnitude representation of number may underlie success on the ordinal task...
  13. ncbi request reprint Number bias for the discrimination of large visual sets in infancy
    Elizabeth M Brannon
    Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Duke University, Box 90999, Durham, NC 27708 0999, USA
    Cognition 93:B59-68. 2004
    ..The results point to a more complicated relationship between discrete and continuous dimensions than implied by previous literature...
  14. pmc Monkeys match and tally quantities across senses
    Kerry E Jordan
    Department of Psychology, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322, USA
    Cognition 108:617-25. 2008
    ..These findings suggest monkeys and humans share an abstract numerical code that can be divorced from the modality in which stimuli are first experienced...
  15. ncbi request reprint Monkeys match the number of voices they hear to the number of faces they see
    Kerry E Jordan
    Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Duke University, Box 90999, Durham, North Carolina 27708, USA
    Curr Biol 15:1034-8. 2005
    ..These findings suggest that number representations held by monkeys, like those held by adult humans, are unfettered by stimulus modality...
  16. doi request reprint Quantitative competencies in infancy
    Sara Cordes
    Duke University Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Dev Sci 11:803-8. 2008
    ..The preverbal infant may be better able to extract numerosity than continuous variables from arrays of discrete items...
  17. pmc Developmental changes in category-specific brain responses to numbers and letters in a working memory task
    Melissa E Libertus
    Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Neuroimage 44:1404-14. 2009
    ..Lastly, behavioral performance on the WM task was predictive of math and language abilities highlighting the connection between WM and other cognitive abilities in development...
  18. pmc The neural development of an abstract concept of number
    Jessica F Cantlon
    Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    J Cogn Neurosci 21:2217-29. 2009
    ....
  19. doi request reprint Induced alpha-band oscillations reflect ratio-dependent number discrimination in the infant brain
    Melissa E Libertus
    Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Levine Science Research Center, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    J Cogn Neurosci 21:2398-406. 2009
    ....
  20. pmc The difficulties of representing continuous extent in infancy: using number is just easier
    Sara Cordes
    Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Duke University, Box 90999, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Child Dev 79:476-89. 2008
    ..These findings also shed light on the processes involved in tracking continuous variables in infants...
  21. pmc Spontaneous analog number representations in 3-year-old children
    Jessica F Cantlon
    Department of Psychology and Neurocience and Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Dev Sci 13:289-97. 2010
    ..These findings provide evidence of young children's greater sensitivity to number relative to other quantities and demonstrate continuity in the process they spontaneously recruit to judge small and large values...
  22. pmc Primate location preference in a double-tier cage: the effects of illumination and cage height
    Evan L Maclean
    Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    J Appl Anim Welf Sci 12:73-81. 2009
    ..These results corroborate the importance of providing captive primates with access to elevated areas...
  23. pmc Comment on "Log or linear? Distinct intuitions of the number scale in Western and Amazonian indigene cultures"
    Jessica F Cantlon
    Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Science 323:38; author reply 38. 2009
    ..However, their data do not rule out the alternative conclusion that Mundurucu speakers encode numbers linearly with scalar variability and psychologically construct space-number mappings by analogy...
  24. pmc Beyond the number domain
    Jessica F Cantlon
    Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Trends Cogn Sci 13:83-91. 2009
    ....
  25. pmc Stable individual differences in number discrimination in infancy
    Melissa E Libertus
    Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Dev Sci 13:900-6. 2010
    ....
  26. pmc The relative salience of discrete and continuous quantity in young infants
    Sara Cordes
    Duke University Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Dev Sci 12:453-63. 2009
    ..These results should temper the conclusion that infants find continuous properties more salient than number and instead suggest that number is spontaneously represented by young infants, even when other cues are available...
  27. pmc Do monkeys think in metaphors? Representations of space and time in monkeys and humans
    Dustin J Merritt
    Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Duke University, Box 90999, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Cognition 117:191-202. 2010
    ..Thus, consistent with previous findings, human adults showed asymmetrical space-time interactions that were predicted by metaphor theory. In contrast, monkeys showed patterns that were more consistent with ATOM...
  28. ncbi request reprint Numerical abstraction: it ain't broke
    Jessica F Cantlon
    Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Behav Brain Sci 32:331-2; discussion 356-73. 2009
    ..Additionally, much of the behavioral and neural data cited to support CK&W's proposal is, in fact, neutral on the issue of numerical abstraction...
  29. pmc Context affects the numerical semantic congruity effect in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta)
    Sarah M Jones
    Department of Psychology and Neuroscience and Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 0999, United States
    Behav Processes 83:191-6. 2010
    ..Thus our data provide further evidence for the existence of a shared numerical comparison process in monkeys and humans...
  30. pmc Empty sets as part of the numerical continuum: conceptual precursors to the zero concept in rhesus monkeys
    Dustin J Merritt
    Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 0999, USA
    J Exp Psychol Gen 138:258-69. 2009
    ..All monkeys successfully matched and ordered the empty sets without any training. Accuracy showed distance effects, indicating that they treated empty sets as values on a numerical continuum...
  31. ncbi request reprint Shared system for ordering small and large numbers in monkeys and humans
    Jessica F Cantlon
    Department of Psychological, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Psychol Sci 17:401-6. 2006
    ..The qualitative and quantitative similarity in their performance provides the strongest evidence to date of a single nonverbal, evolutionarily primitive mechanism for representing and comparing numerical values...
  32. pmc Functional imaging of numerical processing in adults and 4-y-old children
    Jessica F Cantlon
    Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA
    PLoS Biol 4:e125. 2006
    ..More broadly, this is also, to our knowledge, the first cognitive fMRI study to test healthy children as young as 4 y, providing new insights into the neurophysiology of human cognitive development...
  33. pmc The multisensory representation of number in infancy
    Kerry E Jordan
    Center for Cognitive Neuroscience and Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103:3486-9. 2006
    ..Results support the possibility of a shared system between preverbal infants and nonverbal animals for representing number...
  34. ncbi request reprint Nonverbal representation of time and number in adults
    Jamie D Roitman
    Department of Neurobiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Acta Psychol (Amst) 124:296-318. 2007
    ..These results support the notion that adults simultaneously represent the number and duration of stimuli but suggest a possible asymmetry in their representations...
  35. ncbi request reprint A common representational system governed by Weber's law: nonverbal numerical similarity judgments in 6-year-olds and rhesus macaques
    Kerry E Jordan
    Center for Cognitive Neuroscience and Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    J Exp Child Psychol 95:215-29. 2006
    ..These examples of superimposition demonstrate that nonverbal number representations, even in children who have acquired the verbal counting system, are modulated by Weber's law...
  36. ncbi request reprint Adding up the effects of cultural experience on the brain
    Jessica F Cantlon
    Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Trends Cogn Sci 11:1-4. 2007
    ..Their results raise important questions about the cognitive and neural specificity of cultural influences on mathematical processes and the core nature of mathematical cognition...
  37. ncbi request reprint How much does number matter to a monkey (Macaca mulatta)?
    Jessica F Cantlon
    Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 0999, USA
    J Exp Psychol Anim Behav Process 33:32-41. 2007
    ..Contrary to the last-resort hypothesis, all monkeys based their decisions on numerical value when the numerical ratio was favorable...
  38. ncbi request reprint Heterogeneity impairs numerical matching but not numerical ordering in preschool children
    Jessica Cantlon
    Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, and Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Dev Sci 10:431-40. 2007
    ..We suggest that nonverbal numerical abstraction occurs early in development, but specific task objectives may prevent children from engaging in numerical abstraction...
  39. pmc Monotonic coding of numerosity in macaque lateral intraparietal area
    Jamie D Roitman
    Department of Neurobiology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America
    PLoS Biol 5:e208. 2007
    ..Our findings may explain the frequent association of visuospatial and numerical deficits following damage to parietal cortex in humans...
  40. pmc Semantic congruity affects numerical judgments similarly in monkeys and humans
    Jessica F Cantlon
    Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences and Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Duke University, Box 90999, Durham, NC 27708 0999, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102:16507-11. 2005
    ..This finding demonstrates a semantic congruity effect in a nonlinguistic animal and provides strong evidence for an evolutionarily primitive magnitude-comparison algorithm common to humans and monkeys...
  41. pmc Basic math in monkeys and college students
    Jessica F Cantlon
    Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America
    PLoS Biol 5:e328. 2007
    ..Our data demonstrate that nonverbal arithmetic is not unique to humans but is instead part of an evolutionarily primitive system for mathematical thinking shared by monkeys...
  42. ncbi request reprint Weber's Law influences numerical representations in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta)
    Kerry E Jordan
    Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Duke University, Box 90999, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Anim Cogn 9:159-72. 2006
    ..Both accuracy and reaction time were modulated by the ratio between the correct numerical match and the distracter, as predicted by Weber's Law...
  43. pmc Intersensory redundancy accelerates preverbal numerical competence
    Kerry E Jordan
    Department of Psychology, Utah State University, 487 Education Building, 2810 Old Main Hill, Logan, UT 84322, USA
    Cognition 108:210-21. 2008
    ..Multimodal stimuli may thus boost abstract cognitive abilities such as numerical competence...
  44. ncbi request reprint Serial expertise of rhesus macaques
    Herbert S Terrace
    Department of Psychology, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027, USA
    Psychol Sci 14:66-73. 2003
    ..These features of subjects' performance, which cannot be attributed to procedural memory, satisfy two criteria of declarative memory: rapid acquisition of new knowledge and flexible application of existing knowledge to a new problem...
  45. pmc A comparative analysis of serial ordering in ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta)
    Dustin Merritt
    Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 0999, USA
    J Comp Psychol 121:363-71. 2007
    ..Lemurs' accuracy and response times were similar to monkeys, thus suggesting that they may share mechanisms for serial organization that dates to a common primate ancestor...
  46. ncbi request reprint Effectiveness of video of conspecifics as a reward for socially housed bonnet macaques (Macaca radiata)
    Elizabeth M Brannon
    Duke University, USA
    Percept Mot Skills 98:849-58. 2004
    ....
  47. ncbi request reprint Analog number representations in mongoose lemurs (Eulemur mongoz): evidence from a search task
    Kerrie P Lewis
    Department of Anthropology, Washington University, St Louis, MO 63130 4899, USA
    Anim Cogn 8:247-52. 2005
    ..g., area) in the bucket. These results suggest that mongoose lemurs have numerical representations that are modulated by Weber's Law...

Research Grants13

  1. Investigation of numerical abilities in infants with ERP
    ELIZABETH BRANNON; Fiscal Year: 2003
    ..Such insights will contribute to a fuller understanding of the development of mathematical thinking in adults, and may also have important implications for teaching elementary mathematics to children. ..
  2. Representation of number in infancy
    Elizabeth M Brannon; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ....
  3. Number Representation in Primates
    ELIZABETH BRANNON; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ....
  4. Number Representation in Primates
    ELIZABETH BRANNON; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ....
  5. Representation of number in infancy
    ELIZABETH BRANNON; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..Furthermore this research will contribute to a fuller understanding of the development numerical abilities and may therefore have important implications for teaching topics such as elementary mathematics to children. ..
  6. Number Representation in Primates
    Elizabeth M Brannon; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ....