Courtney C Babbitt

Summary

Affiliation: Duke University Medical Center
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Both Noncoding and Protein-Coding RNAs Contribute to Gene Expression Evolution in the Primate Brain
    Courtney C Babbitt
    Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina
    Genome Biol Evol 2010:67-79. 2010
  2. pmc Changes in gene expression associated with reproductive maturation in wild female baboons
    Courtney C Babbitt
    Department of Biology, Duke University
    Genome Biol Evol 4:102-9. 2012
  3. pmc Genomic signatures of diet-related shifts during human origins
    Courtney C Babbitt
    Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Proc Biol Sci 278:961-9. 2011
  4. doi request reprint Multiple Functional Variants in cis Modulate PDYN Expression
    Courtney C Babbitt
    Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy, Duke University, USA
    Mol Biol Evol 27:465-79. 2010
  5. pmc A potential role for glucose transporters in the evolution of human brain size
    Olivier Fedrigo
    Biology Department, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA
    Brain Behav Evol 78:315-26. 2011
  6. pmc The impact of gene expression variation on the robustness and evolvability of a developmental gene regulatory network
    David A Garfield
    Department of Biology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America
    PLoS Biol 11:e1001696. 2013
  7. doi request reprint Comparative expression analysis of the phosphocreatine circuit in extant primates: Implications for human brain evolution
    Adam D Pfefferle
    Biology Department, Duke University, Durham, USA Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy, Duke University, Durham, USA
    J Hum Evol 60:205-12. 2011
  8. pmc Extensive evolutionary changes in regulatory element activity during human origins are associated with altered gene expression and positive selection
    Yoichiro Shibata
    Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America
    PLoS Genet 8:e1002789. 2012
  9. doi request reprint Functional consequences of genetic variation in primates on tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression in vitro
    Lisa R Warner
    Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy, Duke University, Durham 27708, USA Department of Biology, Duke University, Durham 27708, USA
    Brain Res 1288:1-8. 2009
  10. pmc Contrasts between adaptive coding and noncoding changes during human evolution
    Ralph Haygood
    Biology Department and Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107:7853-7. 2010

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications14

  1. pmc Both Noncoding and Protein-Coding RNAs Contribute to Gene Expression Evolution in the Primate Brain
    Courtney C Babbitt
    Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina
    Genome Biol Evol 2010:67-79. 2010
    ....
  2. pmc Changes in gene expression associated with reproductive maturation in wild female baboons
    Courtney C Babbitt
    Department of Biology, Duke University
    Genome Biol Evol 4:102-9. 2012
    ....
  3. pmc Genomic signatures of diet-related shifts during human origins
    Courtney C Babbitt
    Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Proc Biol Sci 278:961-9. 2011
    ..Finally, we propose some ways in which new technologies can help identify specific genomic adaptations that have resulted in metabolic and morphological differences between humans and non-human primates...
  4. doi request reprint Multiple Functional Variants in cis Modulate PDYN Expression
    Courtney C Babbitt
    Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy, Duke University, USA
    Mol Biol Evol 27:465-79. 2010
    ....
  5. pmc A potential role for glucose transporters in the evolution of human brain size
    Olivier Fedrigo
    Biology Department, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA
    Brain Behav Evol 78:315-26. 2011
    ..This study represents the first case where adaptive, functional and genetic lines of evidence implicate specific genes in the evolution of human brain size...
  6. pmc The impact of gene expression variation on the robustness and evolvability of a developmental gene regulatory network
    David A Garfield
    Department of Biology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America
    PLoS Biol 11:e1001696. 2013
    ..These results indicate that the position and properties of gene interactions within a network can have important evolutionary consequences independent of their immediate regulatory role. ..
  7. doi request reprint Comparative expression analysis of the phosphocreatine circuit in extant primates: Implications for human brain evolution
    Adam D Pfefferle
    Biology Department, Duke University, Durham, USA Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy, Duke University, Durham, USA
    J Hum Evol 60:205-12. 2011
    ..Combined with other well-documented differences between humans and non-human primates, this allocation of energy to the cerebral cortex and cerebellum may be important in supporting the increased metabolic demands of the human brain...
  8. pmc Extensive evolutionary changes in regulatory element activity during human origins are associated with altered gene expression and positive selection
    Yoichiro Shibata
    Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America
    PLoS Genet 8:e1002789. 2012
    ..Together, these indicate that the regulatory elements identified here are genetic contributors to transcriptional and phenotypic differences among primate species...
  9. doi request reprint Functional consequences of genetic variation in primates on tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression in vitro
    Lisa R Warner
    Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy, Duke University, Durham 27708, USA Department of Biology, Duke University, Durham 27708, USA
    Brain Res 1288:1-8. 2009
    ..Additionally, the results emphasize the importance of examining more than one cell line, the existence of multiple functional variants in a given promoter region and the presence of non-additive cis-interactions...
  10. pmc Contrasts between adaptive coding and noncoding changes during human evolution
    Ralph Haygood
    Biology Department and Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107:7853-7. 2010
    ..In contrast, adaptive noncoding changes do not exhibit this pattern. Our findings underscore the probable importance of noncoding changes in the evolution of human traits, particularly cognitive traits...
  11. doi request reprint Genetics. Enhancing gene regulation
    Gregory A Wray
    Department of Biology and Institute for Genome Science and Policy, Duke University, Box 90338, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Science 321:1300-1. 2008
  12. doi request reprint Extensive changes in the expression of the opioid genes between humans and chimpanzees
    Peter Cruz-Gordillo
    Department of Biology and Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Brain Behav Evol 76:154-62. 2010
    ..Information about the cognitive roles mediated by these genes in humans may help to elucidate the trait consequences of these putatively adaptive expression changes...
  13. pmc Genetics of gene expression responses to temperature stress in a sea urchin gene network
    Daniel E Runcie
    Department of Biology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Mol Ecol 21:4547-62. 2012
    ....
  14. ncbi request reprint When two is better than one
    Courtney C Babbitt
    Institute for Genome Science and Policy, Duke University, Box 90338, Durham, NC 27708 0338, USA
    Cell 131:225-7. 2007
    ..This combination of evolutionary changes appears to have resolved an adaptive conflict, leading to increased organismal fitness...