S H Johnson

Summary

Affiliation: Dartmouth Medical School
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Thinking ahead: the case for motor imagery in prospective judgements of prehension
    S H Johnson
    Dartmouth College, Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, 6162 Moore Hall, Hanover, NH 03755 3569, USA
    Cognition 74:33-70. 2000
  2. ncbi request reprint Within grasp but out of reach: evidence for a double dissociation between imagined hand and arm movements in the left cerebral hemisphere
    S H Johnson
    Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, 6162 Moore Hall, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03756 3569, USA
    Neuropsychologia 39:36-50. 2001
  3. ncbi request reprint Seeing two sides at once: effects of viewpoint and object structure on recognizing three-dimensional objects
    S H Johnson
    Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 3569, USA
    J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform 27:1468-84. 2001
  4. ncbi request reprint Intact motor imagery in chronic upper limb hemiplegics: evidence for activity-independent action representations
    Scott H Johnson
    Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Medical School, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755 3569, USA
    J Cogn Neurosci 14:841-52. 2002
  5. ncbi request reprint What's so special about human tool use?
    Scott H Johnson-Frey
    Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Dartmouth College and Department of Psychiatry, Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, NH 03755, USA
    Neuron 39:201-4. 2003
  6. ncbi request reprint Actions or hand-object interactions? Human inferior frontal cortex and action observation
    Scott H Johnson-Frey
    Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755, USA
    Neuron 39:1053-8. 2003
  7. ncbi request reprint Stimulation through simulation? Motor imagery and functional reorganization in hemiplegic stroke patients
    Scott H Johnson-Frey
    Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Dartmouth College and Department of Psychiatry, Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, NH 03755 3569, USA
    Brain Cogn 55:328-31. 2004
  8. ncbi request reprint The neural bases of complex tool use in humans
    Scott H Johnson-Frey
    Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Dartmouth College, 6162 Moore Hall, Hanover, NH 03755 3569, USA
    Trends Cogn Sci 8:71-8. 2004
  9. ncbi request reprint Selective activation of a parietofrontal circuit during implicitly imagined prehension
    S H Johnson
    Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 3569, USA
    Neuroimage 17:1693-704. 2002

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications9

  1. ncbi request reprint Thinking ahead: the case for motor imagery in prospective judgements of prehension
    S H Johnson
    Dartmouth College, Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, 6162 Moore Hall, Hanover, NH 03755 3569, USA
    Cognition 74:33-70. 2000
    ..A provisional model for the involvement of imagery in motor planning is outlined, as are a set of criteria for evaluating claims of the involvement of motor imagery in problem solving...
  2. ncbi request reprint Within grasp but out of reach: evidence for a double dissociation between imagined hand and arm movements in the left cerebral hemisphere
    S H Johnson
    Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, 6162 Moore Hall, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03756 3569, USA
    Neuropsychologia 39:36-50. 2001
    ..The double dissociation between imagery for hand and arm movements in the left cerebral hemispere is consistent with the hypothesis that grasping and reaching components of prehension involve dissociable planning mechanisms...
  3. ncbi request reprint Seeing two sides at once: effects of viewpoint and object structure on recognizing three-dimensional objects
    S H Johnson
    Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 3569, USA
    J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform 27:1468-84. 2001
    ..Consistent with this interpretation, a final study showed that even slight rotations away from 180 degrees cause precipitous drops in recognition accuracy...
  4. ncbi request reprint Intact motor imagery in chronic upper limb hemiplegics: evidence for activity-independent action representations
    Scott H Johnson
    Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Medical School, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755 3569, USA
    J Cogn Neurosci 14:841-52. 2002
    ..Further, they demonstrate that internal action representations can be robust to even years of limb disuse...
  5. ncbi request reprint What's so special about human tool use?
    Scott H Johnson-Frey
    Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Dartmouth College and Department of Psychiatry, Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, NH 03755, USA
    Neuron 39:201-4. 2003
    ..Available evidence implicates higher-level perceptual areas in these processes...
  6. ncbi request reprint Actions or hand-object interactions? Human inferior frontal cortex and action observation
    Scott H Johnson-Frey
    Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755, USA
    Neuron 39:1053-8. 2003
    ..Bilaterally, precentral gyrus was most frequently activated (82%) followed by pars triangularis (73%) and pars opercularis (65%)...
  7. ncbi request reprint Stimulation through simulation? Motor imagery and functional reorganization in hemiplegic stroke patients
    Scott H Johnson-Frey
    Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Dartmouth College and Department of Psychiatry, Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, NH 03755 3569, USA
    Brain Cogn 55:328-31. 2004
    ..Further, I discuss preliminary evidence that internally simulating movements may induce functional reorganization of the contralesional hand representation of a chronic, densely hemiplegic, cerebral vascular accident (CVA) patient...
  8. ncbi request reprint The neural bases of complex tool use in humans
    Scott H Johnson-Frey
    Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Dartmouth College, 6162 Moore Hall, Hanover, NH 03755 3569, USA
    Trends Cogn Sci 8:71-8. 2004
    ..Together, these findings indicate that behaviors associated with complex tool use arise from functionally specialized networks involving temporal, parietal and frontal areas within the left cerebral hemisphere...
  9. ncbi request reprint Selective activation of a parietofrontal circuit during implicitly imagined prehension
    S H Johnson
    Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 3569, USA
    Neuroimage 17:1693-704. 2002
    ..Because these areas are highly consistent with the frontoparietal reach circuit identified in monkeys, we conclude that motor imagery involves action-specific motor representations computed in parietofrontal circuits...