Brian Wansink

Summary

Affiliation: Cornell University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint How negative experiences shape long-term food preferences. Fifty years from the World War II combat front
    Brian Wansink
    Cornell University, 110 Warren Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853 7801, United States
    Appetite 52:750-2. 2009
  2. pmc Food compensation: do exercise ads change food intake?
    Ellen van Kleef
    Wageningen University, Marketing and Consumer Behaviour Group, Hollandseweg 1, 6706 KN Wageningen, The Netherlands
    Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act 8:6. 2011
  3. pmc Food exemplar salience. What foods do people think of when you tell them to change their diet?
    Carolyn R Brown-Kramer
    University of Nebraska Lincoln, United States
    Appetite 52:753-6. 2009
  4. doi request reprint From mindless eating to mindlessly eating better
    Brian Wansink
    Cornell University, 110 Warren Hall, Ithaca, NY 14850, United States
    Physiol Behav 100:454-63. 2010
  5. doi request reprint "Is this a meal or snack?" Situational cues that drive perceptions
    Brian Wansink
    Cornell University, 110 Warren Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
    Appetite 54:214-6. 2010
  6. doi request reprint Consequences of belonging to the "clean plate club"
    Brian Wansink
    Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA
    Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med 162:994-5. 2008
  7. doi request reprint Smarter lunchrooms can address new school lunchroom guidelines and childhood obesity
    Andrew S Hanks
    Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
    J Pediatr 162:867-9. 2013
  8. doi request reprint College cafeteria snack food purchases become less healthy with each passing week of the semester
    Brian Wansink
    Dyson School Applied Economics and Management, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850, USA
    Public Health Nutr 16:1291-5. 2013
  9. doi request reprint Death row nutrition. Curious conclusions of last meals
    Brian Wansink
    Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management, Cornell University, Warren Hall 303, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
    Appetite 59:837-43. 2012
  10. doi request reprint Pre-sliced fruit in school cafeterias: children's selection and intake
    Brian Wansink
    Charles H Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
    Am J Prev Med 44:477-80. 2013

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications40

  1. ncbi request reprint How negative experiences shape long-term food preferences. Fifty years from the World War II combat front
    Brian Wansink
    Cornell University, 110 Warren Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853 7801, United States
    Appetite 52:750-2. 2009
    ..Consistent with expectations, combat experience for European veterans had no impact on their preference for Asian food. The situation in which one is initially exposed to an unfamiliar food may long continue to shape preferences...
  2. pmc Food compensation: do exercise ads change food intake?
    Ellen van Kleef
    Wageningen University, Marketing and Consumer Behaviour Group, Hollandseweg 1, 6706 KN Wageningen, The Netherlands
    Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act 8:6. 2011
    ..This study experimentally tested the effects of exposure to exercise commercials on food intake at a lunch meal as compared to the effects of control commercials...
  3. pmc Food exemplar salience. What foods do people think of when you tell them to change their diet?
    Carolyn R Brown-Kramer
    University of Nebraska Lincoln, United States
    Appetite 52:753-6. 2009
    ..These findings have implications for understanding how individuals respond to dietary guidelines and devising effective intervention strategies...
  4. doi request reprint From mindless eating to mindlessly eating better
    Brian Wansink
    Cornell University, 110 Warren Hall, Ithaca, NY 14850, United States
    Physiol Behav 100:454-63. 2010
    ..The paper represents an invited review by a symposium, award winner or keynote speaker at the Society for the Study of Ingestive Behavior [SSIB] Annual Meeting in Portland, July 2009...
  5. doi request reprint "Is this a meal or snack?" Situational cues that drive perceptions
    Brian Wansink
    Cornell University, 110 Warren Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
    Appetite 54:214-6. 2010
    ..Implications for dieters and for health professionals are provided...
  6. doi request reprint Consequences of belonging to the "clean plate club"
    Brian Wansink
    Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA
    Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med 162:994-5. 2008
  7. doi request reprint Smarter lunchrooms can address new school lunchroom guidelines and childhood obesity
    Andrew S Hanks
    Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
    J Pediatr 162:867-9. 2013
    ..An intervention using the behavioral science principle known as "libertarian paternalism" led junior-senior high school students to eat more fruits and vegetables by making these foods more convenient, attractive, and normative...
  8. doi request reprint College cafeteria snack food purchases become less healthy with each passing week of the semester
    Brian Wansink
    Dyson School Applied Economics and Management, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850, USA
    Public Health Nutr 16:1291-5. 2013
    ..The present study examines how a` la carte snack choice changes on a university campus during each progressing week of the academic calendar...
  9. doi request reprint Death row nutrition. Curious conclusions of last meals
    Brian Wansink
    Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management, Cornell University, Warren Hall 303, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
    Appetite 59:837-43. 2012
    ....
  10. doi request reprint Pre-sliced fruit in school cafeterias: children's selection and intake
    Brian Wansink
    Charles H Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
    Am J Prev Med 44:477-80. 2013
    ..Interviews with children reveal that eating whole fresh fruit can be difficult for those with small mouths or braces. Older girls find whole fruits messy and unattractive to eat...
  11. doi request reprint Healthy convenience: nudging students toward healthier choices in the lunchroom
    Andrew S Hanks
    Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850, USA
    J Public Health (Oxf) 34:370-6. 2012
    ..This study examines the application of this principle in a school lunchroom where healthier foods were made more convenient relative to less healthy foods...
  12. doi request reprint The 100-calorie semi-solution: sub-packaging most reduces intake among the heaviest
    Brian Wansink
    Charles H Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, USA
    Obesity (Silver Spring) 19:1098-100. 2011
    ..Smaller sized sub-packaging most greatly benefits those who are overweight, yet it does so without making people more aware of how much they have eaten...
  13. ncbi request reprint Fine as North Dakota wine: sensory expectations and the intake of companion foods
    Brian Wansink
    Nutritional Science and Applied Economics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
    Physiol Behav 90:712-6. 2007
    ..In combination with a sensory-based lab study, these results show that environmental cues--such as label-induced sensory expectations--can have a far-reaching impact on the food intake of companion foods...
  14. doi request reprint Attractive names sustain increased vegetable intake in schools
    Brian Wansink
    Department of Applied Economics and Management at Cornell University, 15 Warren Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853 7801, USA
    Prev Med 55:330-2. 2012
    ..This study will determine if the selective use of attractive names can be a sustainable, scalable means to increase the selection of vegetables in school lunchrooms...
  15. ncbi request reprint Fast food restaurant lighting and music can reduce calorie intake and increase satisfaction
    Brian Wansink
    John S Dyson Professor of Marketing, Charles H Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management, Cornell University, 110 Warren Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853 7801, USA
    Psychol Rep 111:228-32. 2012
    ..In contrast to hypothesized U-shaped curves (people who spend longer eat more), this suggests a more relaxed environment increases satisfaction and decreases consumption...
  16. doi request reprint Eating behavior and obesity at Chinese buffets
    Brian Wansink
    Department of Applied Economics and Management, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, USA
    Obesity (Silver Spring) 16:1957-60. 2008
    ..The resulting findings could confirm or disconfirm previous laboratory research that has been criticized for being artificial...
  17. ncbi request reprint Counting bones: environmental cues that decrease food intake
    Brian Wansink
    Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA
    Percept Mot Skills 104:273-6. 2007
    ..5.5 wings), with the effect being stronger for men than women. In distracting eating environments, environmental cues may provide an effective means of reducing consumption. Implications for controlling alcohol intake were also noted...
  18. doi request reprint Internal and external cues of meal cessation: the French paradox redux?
    Brian Wansink
    Department of Applied Economics and Management, Cornell University, 110 Warren Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853 7801, USA
    Obesity (Silver Spring) 15:2920-4. 2007
    ..In addition to exploring the role that internal and external cues play in meal cessation, this study raises an overlooked explanation of the French paradox...
  19. doi request reprint Association of nutrient-dense snack combinations with calories and vegetable intake
    Brian Wansink
    Food and Brand Laboratory at the Charles H Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, USA
    Pediatrics 131:22-9. 2013
    ..We examined whether children consumed fewer calories when offered high-nutrient dense snacks consisting of cheese and vegetables than children who were offered non-nutrient dense snacks (ie, potato chips)...
  20. doi request reprint Watching food-related television increases caloric intake in restrained eaters
    Mitsuru Shimizu
    Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850, United States
    Appetite 57:661-4. 2011
    ..Restrained eaters ate more calories while watching a food-related TV program whereas unrestrained eaters were not influenced by the content of the TV program...
  21. ncbi request reprint Nutritional gatekeepers and the 72% solution
    Brian Wansink
    Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA
    J Am Diet Assoc 106:1324-7. 2006
  22. ncbi request reprint Portion size me: downsizing our consumption norms
    Brian Wansink
    Cornell Food and Brand Lab at Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA
    J Am Diet Assoc 107:1103-6. 2007
  23. ncbi request reprint The sweet tooth hypothesis: how fruit consumption relates to snack consumption
    Brian Wansink
    Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
    Appetite 47:107-10. 2006
    ..Knowing that people who frequently eat sweet snacks may be predisposed to increasing their fruit consumption will enable better targeting and tailoring of educational efforts, such as those used in the 5-a-Day for Better Health campaign...
  24. ncbi request reprint Ice cream illusions bowls, spoons, and self-served portion sizes
    Brian Wansink
    Department of Applied Economics and Management, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 7801, USA
    Am J Prev Med 31:240-3. 2006
    ..In building on the size-contrast illusion, this research examines whether the size of a bowl or serving spoon unknowingly biases how much a person serves and eats...
  25. ncbi request reprint Meal size, not body size, explains errors in estimating the calorie content of meals
    Brian Wansink
    Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 7801, USA
    Ann Intern Med 145:326-32. 2006
    ..Although most people underestimate the calories they consume during a meal or during the day, calorie underestimation is especially extreme among overweight persons. The reason for this systematic bias is unknown...
  26. ncbi request reprint Bottomless bowls: why visual cues of portion size may influence intake
    Brian Wansink
    Applied Economics and Marketing, 110 Warren Hall, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 7801, USA
    Obes Res 13:93-100. 2005
    ..Using self-refilling soup bowls, this study examined whether visual cues related to portion size can influence intake volume without altering either estimated intake or satiation...
  27. pmc It's not just lunch: extra-pair commensality can trigger sexual jealousy
    Kevin M Kniffin
    Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 7:e40445. 2012
    ..For romantic partners left out of a meal, we find a common view that lunch, for example, is not "just lunch."..
  28. pmc Turning virtual reality into reality: a checklist to ensure virtual reality studies of eating behavior and physical activity parallel the real world
    Aner Tal
    Charles H Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, USA
    J Diabetes Sci Technol 5:239-44. 2011
    ..For simulation to occur, the virtual environment must be perceived as being available for action. A useful chart is supplied as a reference to help researchers to investigate eating and physical activity more effectively...
  29. doi request reprint How vegetables make the meal: their hedonic and heroic impact on perceptions of the meal and of the preparer
    Brian Wansink
    Warren Hall, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 7801, USA
    Public Health Nutr 16:1988-94. 2013
    ....
  30. pmc Nutrition Report Cards: an opportunity to improve school lunch selection
    Brian Wansink
    John S Dyson Professor of Marketing at the Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 8:e72008. 2013
    ..To explore the feasibility and implementation efficiency of Nutritional Report Cards (NRCs) in helping children make healthier food choices at school...
  31. ncbi request reprint Hierarchy of nutritional knowledge that relates to the consumption of a functional food
    Brian Wansink
    Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, USA
    Nutrition 21:264-8. 2005
    ..We assessed how consumption of a functional food relates to different combinations of nutritional knowledge...
  32. pmc When snacks become meals: How hunger and environmental cues bias food intake
    Mitsuru Shimizu
    Department of Applied Economics and Management, Cornell University, 110 Warren Hall, Ithaca, NY, 14850, USA
    Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act 7:63. 2010
    ..abstract:..
  33. doi request reprint School lunch debit card payment systems are associated with lower Nutrition and higher calories
    David R Just
    Charles H Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York
    Obesity (Silver Spring) 22:24-6. 2014
    ..Debit card payment systems are known to induce more frivolous purchases in adults, but their impact on children is unknown...
  34. pmc Slim by design: serving healthy foods first in buffet lines improves overall meal selection
    Brian Wansink
    Charles S Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 8:e77055. 2013
    ..Knowing how the food order at a buffet triggers what a person selects could be useful in guiding diners to make healthier selections...
  35. pmc Does food marketing need to make us fat? A review and solutions
    Pierre Chandon
    INSEAD, Boulevard de Constance, 77300 Fontainebleau, France
    Nutr Rev 70:571-93. 2012
    ..Throughout, this review underscores the promising opportunities that food manufacturers and retailers have to make profitable "win-win" adjustments to help consumers eat better...
  36. doi request reprint Toxics, Toyotas, and terrorism: the behavioral economics of fear and stigma
    William Schulze
    Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management, Cornell University, NY, USA
    Risk Anal 32:678-94. 2012
    ....
  37. doi request reprint Food plating preferences of children: the importance of presentation on desire for diversity
    Francesca Zampollo
    Sir John Cass Department of Art, Media and Design, London Metropolitan University, UK
    Acta Paediatr 101:61-6. 2012
    ..Given the importance of food presentation and childhood nutrition, we aimed to test the degree to which adults and children might demonstrate different preferences for various ways in which food can be presented on plates...
  38. pmc Shape of glass and amount of alcohol poured: comparative study of effect of practice and concentration
    Brian Wansink
    Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 7801, USA
    BMJ 331:1512-4. 2005
    ..To determine whether people pour different amounts into short, wide glasses than into tall, slender ones...
  39. ncbi request reprint Bad popcorn in big buckets: portion size can influence intake as much as taste
    Brian Wansink
    Department of Applied Economics and Management, Cornell University, Ithica, New York, USA
    J Nutr Educ Behav 37:242-5. 2005
    ..It is often believed that people overeat the foods they like. We investigated whether environmental cues such as packaging and container size are so powerful that they can increase our intake of foods that are less palatable...
  40. ncbi request reprint Position of the American Dietetic Association: food and nutrition misinformation
    Brian Wansink
    Cornell University, Ithica, NY, USA
    J Am Diet Assoc 106:601-7. 2006
    ....