B Wansink

Summary

Affiliation: Cornell University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Environmental factors that increase the food intake and consumption volume of unknowing consumers
    Brian Wansink
    Department of Marketing and Nutritional Science, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, Champaign, Illinois 61820, USA
    Annu Rev Nutr 24:455-79. 2004
  2. doi request reprint Are there atheists in foxholes? Combat intensity and religious behavior
    Brian Wansink
    Applied Economics and Management Department, Cornell Food and Brand Lab at Cornell University, Cornell University, 112 Warren Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
    J Relig Health 52:768-79. 2013
  3. doi request reprint Association of nutrient-dense snack combinations with calories and vegetable intake
    Brian Wansink
    Food and Brand Laboratory at the Charles H Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, USA
    Pediatrics 131:22-9. 2013
  4. doi request reprint Attractive names sustain increased vegetable intake in schools
    Brian Wansink
    Department of Applied Economics and Management at Cornell University, 15 Warren Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853 7801, USA
    Prev Med 55:330-2. 2012
  5. ncbi request reprint Fast food restaurant lighting and music can reduce calorie intake and increase satisfaction
    Brian Wansink
    John S Dyson Professor of Marketing, Charles H Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management, Cornell University, 110 Warren Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853 7801, USA
    Psychol Rep 111:228-32. 2012
  6. pmc When snacks become meals: How hunger and environmental cues bias food intake
    Mitsuru Shimizu
    Department of Applied Economics and Management, Cornell University, 110 Warren Hall, Ithaca, NY, 14850, USA
    Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act 7:63. 2010
  7. ncbi request reprint Ice cream illusions bowls, spoons, and self-served portion sizes
    Brian Wansink
    Department of Applied Economics and Management, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 7801, USA
    Am J Prev Med 31:240-3. 2006
  8. ncbi request reprint Counting bones: environmental cues that decrease food intake
    Brian Wansink
    Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA
    Percept Mot Skills 104:273-6. 2007
  9. doi request reprint The largest Last Supper: depictions of food portions and plate size increased over the millennium
    B Wansink
    Applied Economics and Management Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
    Int J Obes (Lond) 34:943-4. 2010
  10. ncbi request reprint The sweet tooth hypothesis: how fruit consumption relates to snack consumption
    Brian Wansink
    Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
    Appetite 47:107-10. 2006

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications39

  1. ncbi request reprint Environmental factors that increase the food intake and consumption volume of unknowing consumers
    Brian Wansink
    Department of Marketing and Nutritional Science, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, Champaign, Illinois 61820, USA
    Annu Rev Nutr 24:455-79. 2004
    ..For health professionals, this review underscores how small structural changes in personal environments can reduce the unknowing overconsumption of food...
  2. doi request reprint Are there atheists in foxholes? Combat intensity and religious behavior
    Brian Wansink
    Applied Economics and Management Department, Cornell Food and Brand Lab at Cornell University, Cornell University, 112 Warren Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
    J Relig Health 52:768-79. 2013
    ..While implications for counselors, clergy, support groups, and health practitioners are outlined, saying there are no atheists in foxholes may be less of an argument against atheism than it is against foxholes...
  3. doi request reprint Association of nutrient-dense snack combinations with calories and vegetable intake
    Brian Wansink
    Food and Brand Laboratory at the Charles H Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, USA
    Pediatrics 131:22-9. 2013
    ..We examined whether children consumed fewer calories when offered high-nutrient dense snacks consisting of cheese and vegetables than children who were offered non-nutrient dense snacks (ie, potato chips)...
  4. doi request reprint Attractive names sustain increased vegetable intake in schools
    Brian Wansink
    Department of Applied Economics and Management at Cornell University, 15 Warren Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853 7801, USA
    Prev Med 55:330-2. 2012
    ..This study will determine if the selective use of attractive names can be a sustainable, scalable means to increase the selection of vegetables in school lunchrooms...
  5. ncbi request reprint Fast food restaurant lighting and music can reduce calorie intake and increase satisfaction
    Brian Wansink
    John S Dyson Professor of Marketing, Charles H Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management, Cornell University, 110 Warren Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853 7801, USA
    Psychol Rep 111:228-32. 2012
    ..In contrast to hypothesized U-shaped curves (people who spend longer eat more), this suggests a more relaxed environment increases satisfaction and decreases consumption...
  6. pmc When snacks become meals: How hunger and environmental cues bias food intake
    Mitsuru Shimizu
    Department of Applied Economics and Management, Cornell University, 110 Warren Hall, Ithaca, NY, 14850, USA
    Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act 7:63. 2010
    ..abstract:..
  7. ncbi request reprint Ice cream illusions bowls, spoons, and self-served portion sizes
    Brian Wansink
    Department of Applied Economics and Management, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 7801, USA
    Am J Prev Med 31:240-3. 2006
    ..In building on the size-contrast illusion, this research examines whether the size of a bowl or serving spoon unknowingly biases how much a person serves and eats...
  8. ncbi request reprint Counting bones: environmental cues that decrease food intake
    Brian Wansink
    Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA
    Percept Mot Skills 104:273-6. 2007
    ..5.5 wings), with the effect being stronger for men than women. In distracting eating environments, environmental cues may provide an effective means of reducing consumption. Implications for controlling alcohol intake were also noted...
  9. doi request reprint The largest Last Supper: depictions of food portions and plate size increased over the millennium
    B Wansink
    Applied Economics and Management Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
    Int J Obes (Lond) 34:943-4. 2010
    ..52, P=0.002), bread (r=0.30, P=0.04), and plates (r=0.46, P=0.02) have linearly increased over the past millennium...
  10. ncbi request reprint The sweet tooth hypothesis: how fruit consumption relates to snack consumption
    Brian Wansink
    Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
    Appetite 47:107-10. 2006
    ..Knowing that people who frequently eat sweet snacks may be predisposed to increasing their fruit consumption will enable better targeting and tailoring of educational efforts, such as those used in the 5-a-Day for Better Health campaign...
  11. ncbi request reprint Fluid consumption and the potential role of canteen shape in minimizing dehydration
    Brian Wansink
    Consumer Psychology and Nutritional Science, University of Illinois, 350 Wohlers Hall, Champaign, IL 61820, USA
    Mil Med 170:871-3. 2005
    ..Even although those given short, wide water bottles poured 38% more water, they did not perceive themselves as having poured or drunk more. The implications for decreasing dehydration in the field and in garrison are discussed...
  12. ncbi request reprint The office candy dish: proximity's influence on estimated and actual consumption
    B Wansink
    Cornell Food and Brand Laboratory, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
    Int J Obes (Lond) 30:871-5. 2006
    ..does the proximity and salience of a food influence consumption volume? Second, are proximate foods consumed more frequently because they are proximate, or are they consumed more frequently because people lose track of how much they eat?..
  13. pmc Shape of glass and amount of alcohol poured: comparative study of effect of practice and concentration
    Brian Wansink
    Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 7801, USA
    BMJ 331:1512-4. 2005
    ..To determine whether people pour different amounts into short, wide glasses than into tall, slender ones...
  14. ncbi request reprint Bad popcorn in big buckets: portion size can influence intake as much as taste
    Brian Wansink
    Department of Applied Economics and Management, Cornell University, Ithica, New York, USA
    J Nutr Educ Behav 37:242-5. 2005
    ..It is often believed that people overeat the foods they like. We investigated whether environmental cues such as packaging and container size are so powerful that they can increase our intake of foods that are less palatable...
  15. doi request reprint Internal and external cues of meal cessation: the French paradox redux?
    Brian Wansink
    Department of Applied Economics and Management, Cornell University, 110 Warren Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853 7801, USA
    Obesity (Silver Spring) 15:2920-4. 2007
    ..In addition to exploring the role that internal and external cues play in meal cessation, this study raises an overlooked explanation of the French paradox...
  16. doi request reprint The 100-calorie semi-solution: sub-packaging most reduces intake among the heaviest
    Brian Wansink
    Charles H Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, USA
    Obesity (Silver Spring) 19:1098-100. 2011
    ..Smaller sized sub-packaging most greatly benefits those who are overweight, yet it does so without making people more aware of how much they have eaten...
  17. ncbi request reprint Hierarchy of nutritional knowledge that relates to the consumption of a functional food
    Brian Wansink
    Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, USA
    Nutrition 21:264-8. 2005
    ..We assessed how consumption of a functional food relates to different combinations of nutritional knowledge...
  18. ncbi request reprint Fine as North Dakota wine: sensory expectations and the intake of companion foods
    Brian Wansink
    Nutritional Science and Applied Economics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
    Physiol Behav 90:712-6. 2007
    ..In combination with a sensory-based lab study, these results show that environmental cues--such as label-induced sensory expectations--can have a far-reaching impact on the food intake of companion foods...
  19. ncbi request reprint Exploring comfort food preferences across age and gender
    Brian Wansink
    University of Illinois, 350 Wholers Hall, Champaign, IL 61801, USA
    Physiol Behav 79:739-47. 2003
    ..Associations with guilty feelings underscored how these different preferences between males and females may extend to areas of application...
  20. doi request reprint What would Batman eat?: priming children to make healthier fast food choices
    B Wansink
    Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
    Pediatr Obes 7:121-3. 2012
    ..Fast food patronage is a frequent reality for many children and their parents. Although there are increasingly healthier alternatives for popular menu items (apple slices instead of French fries), they are infrequently selected...
  21. doi request reprint "Is this a meal or snack?" Situational cues that drive perceptions
    Brian Wansink
    Cornell University, 110 Warren Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
    Appetite 54:214-6. 2010
    ..Implications for dieters and for health professionals are provided...
  22. ncbi request reprint How negative experiences shape long-term food preferences. Fifty years from the World War II combat front
    Brian Wansink
    Cornell University, 110 Warren Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853 7801, United States
    Appetite 52:750-2. 2009
    ..Consistent with expectations, combat experience for European veterans had no impact on their preference for Asian food. The situation in which one is initially exposed to an unfamiliar food may long continue to shape preferences...
  23. ncbi request reprint Meal size, not body size, explains errors in estimating the calorie content of meals
    Brian Wansink
    Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 7801, USA
    Ann Intern Med 145:326-32. 2006
    ..Although most people underestimate the calories they consume during a meal or during the day, calorie underestimation is especially extreme among overweight persons. The reason for this systematic bias is unknown...
  24. doi request reprint Consequences of belonging to the "clean plate club"
    Brian Wansink
    Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA
    Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med 162:994-5. 2008
  25. doi request reprint From mindless eating to mindlessly eating better
    Brian Wansink
    Cornell University, 110 Warren Hall, Ithaca, NY 14850, United States
    Physiol Behav 100:454-63. 2010
    ..The paper represents an invited review by a symposium, award winner or keynote speaker at the Society for the Study of Ingestive Behavior [SSIB] Annual Meeting in Portland, July 2009...
  26. ncbi request reprint Bottomless bowls: why visual cues of portion size may influence intake
    Brian Wansink
    Applied Economics and Marketing, 110 Warren Hall, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 7801, USA
    Obes Res 13:93-100. 2005
    ..Using self-refilling soup bowls, this study examined whether visual cues related to portion size can influence intake volume without altering either estimated intake or satiation...
  27. doi request reprint Eating behavior and obesity at Chinese buffets
    Brian Wansink
    Department of Applied Economics and Management, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, USA
    Obesity (Silver Spring) 16:1957-60. 2008
    ..The resulting findings could confirm or disconfirm previous laboratory research that has been criticized for being artificial...
  28. ncbi request reprint Portion size me: downsizing our consumption norms
    Brian Wansink
    Cornell Food and Brand Lab at Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA
    J Am Diet Assoc 107:1103-6. 2007
  29. ncbi request reprint Interactions between forms of fat consumption and restaurant bread consumption
    Brian Wansink
    University of Illinois, Urbana Champaign, Champaign, IL 61820, USA
    Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord 27:866-8. 2003
    ..This finding illustrates one way in which fat intake can interact with the consumption of companion foods...
  30. ncbi request reprint Nutritional gatekeepers and the 72% solution
    Brian Wansink
    Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA
    J Am Diet Assoc 106:1324-7. 2006
  31. ncbi request reprint Profiling taste-motivated segments
    Brian Wansink
    University of Illinois, 350 Wohlers Hall, Champaign, IL 61801, USA
    Appetite 41:323-7. 2003
    ..This same method has potential for more effectively promoting the consumption of fruits and vegetables or the consumption of genetically enhanced foods among predisposed taste-motivated segments...
  32. ncbi request reprint Consumer reactions to food safety crises
    Brian Wansink
    Marketing, Nutritional Science, and Agricultural and Consumer Economics, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, Champaign, Illinois 61820, USA
    Adv Food Nutr Res 48:103-50. 2004
  33. ncbi request reprint Position of the American Dietetic Association: food and nutrition misinformation
    Brian Wansink
    Cornell University, Ithica, NY, USA
    J Am Diet Assoc 106:601-7. 2006
    ....
  34. doi request reprint Project M.O.M.: Mothers & Others & MyPyramid
    Brian Wansink
    Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion, US Department of Agriculture, Alexandria, VA 22302, USA
    J Am Diet Assoc 108:1302-4. 2008
  35. ncbi request reprint Do children really prefer large portions? Visual illusions bias their estimates and intake
    Koert van Ittersum
    J Am Diet Assoc 107:1107-10. 2007
  36. ncbi request reprint What really determines what we eat. The hidden truth
    Brian Wansink
    Diabetes Self Manag 23:44, 47-8, 51. 2006
  37. ncbi request reprint Super Bowls: serving bowl size and food consumption
    Brian Wansink
    JAMA 293:1727-8. 2005
  38. ncbi request reprint Cooking habits provide a key to 5 a day success
    Brian Wansink
    J Am Diet Assoc 104:1648-50. 2004
  39. ncbi request reprint How visibility and convenience influence candy consumption
    James E Painter
    University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, USA
    Appetite 38:237-8. 2002