C Drew Harvell

Summary

Affiliation: Cornell University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Climate warming and disease risks for terrestrial and marine biota
    C Drew Harvell
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
    Science 296:2158-62. 2002
  2. doi request reprint Within-host disease ecology in the sea fan Gorgonia ventalina: modeling the spatial immunodynamics of a coral-pathogen interaction
    Stephen P Ellner
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853, USA
    Am Nat 170:E143-61. 2007
  3. ncbi request reprint Peroxidase activity and inducibility in the sea fan coral exposed to a fungal pathogen
    Laura D Mydlarz
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca NY 14853 USA
    Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol 146:54-62. 2007
  4. doi request reprint Coral-associated bacterial assemblages: current knowledge and the potential for climate-driven impacts
    Morgan E Mouchka
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
    Integr Comp Biol 50:662-74. 2010
  5. doi request reprint Globally panmictic population structure in the opportunistic fungal pathogen Aspergillus sydowii
    Krystal L Rypien
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Dale R Corson Hall, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
    Mol Ecol 17:4068-78. 2008
  6. ncbi request reprint The rise and fall of a six-year coral-fungal epizootic
    Kiho Kim
    Department of Biology, American University, Washington, DC 20016 8007, USA
    Am Nat 164:S52-63. 2004
  7. ncbi request reprint Longitudinal study of aspergillosis in sea fan corals
    Kiho Kim
    Department of Biology, American University, 4400 Massachusetts Ave, NW, Washington, DC 20016, USA
    Dis Aquat Organ 69:95-9. 2006
  8. ncbi request reprint Causes of coral reef degradation
    Richard B Aronson
    Science 302:1502-4; author reply 1502-4. 2003
  9. pmc Thermal stress and coral cover as drivers of coral disease outbreaks
    John F Bruno
    Department of Marine Sciences, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States of America
    PLoS Biol 5:e124. 2007
  10. ncbi request reprint Porites ulcerative white spot disease: description, prevalence, and host range of a new coral disease affecting Indo-Pacific reefs
    Laurie J H Raymundo
    Silliman University Marine Laboratory, Dumaguete City 6200, Philippines
    Dis Aquat Organ 56:95-104. 2003

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications11

  1. ncbi request reprint Climate warming and disease risks for terrestrial and marine biota
    C Drew Harvell
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
    Science 296:2158-62. 2002
    ..To improve our ability to predict epidemics in wild populations, it will be necessary to separate the independent and interactive effects of multiple climate drivers on disease impact...
  2. doi request reprint Within-host disease ecology in the sea fan Gorgonia ventalina: modeling the spatial immunodynamics of a coral-pathogen interaction
    Stephen P Ellner
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853, USA
    Am Nat 170:E143-61. 2007
    ..g., ocean warming, nutrient enrichment) on aspergillosis prevalence and severity and for the observed high spatial and between-host variability in disease impacts...
  3. ncbi request reprint Peroxidase activity and inducibility in the sea fan coral exposed to a fungal pathogen
    Laura D Mydlarz
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca NY 14853 USA
    Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol 146:54-62. 2007
    ..ventalina utilizes these enzymes as an integral component in disease resistance pathways. As such, they may also contribute to the initiation of physiochemical defenses such as melanization and lipid soluble anti-fungal metabolites...
  4. doi request reprint Coral-associated bacterial assemblages: current knowledge and the potential for climate-driven impacts
    Morgan E Mouchka
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
    Integr Comp Biol 50:662-74. 2010
    ..We suggest that the relationship between coral and their bacterial associates represents a valuable model that can be applied to the broader discipline of invertebrate-microbial interactions...
  5. doi request reprint Globally panmictic population structure in the opportunistic fungal pathogen Aspergillus sydowii
    Krystal L Rypien
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Dale R Corson Hall, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
    Mol Ecol 17:4068-78. 2008
    ..This study highlights the challenge in distinguishing between the role of environment in allowing opportunistic pathogens to increase and actual introductions of new pathogenic microorganisms for coral diseases...
  6. ncbi request reprint The rise and fall of a six-year coral-fungal epizootic
    Kiho Kim
    Department of Biology, American University, Washington, DC 20016 8007, USA
    Am Nat 164:S52-63. 2004
    ..However, a change in any of a number of factors, for example, recruitment of naive hosts, rate of pathogen input, or environmental conditions (water quality and temperature), is likely to promote reemergence of the epizootic...
  7. ncbi request reprint Longitudinal study of aspergillosis in sea fan corals
    Kiho Kim
    Department of Biology, American University, 4400 Massachusetts Ave, NW, Washington, DC 20016, USA
    Dis Aquat Organ 69:95-9. 2006
    ..During an outbreak at Carysfort, mortality was 95% yr(-1) among diseased sea fans. These data clearly demonstrate the significant role aspergillosis plays in the population ecology of sea fan corals...
  8. ncbi request reprint Causes of coral reef degradation
    Richard B Aronson
    Science 302:1502-4; author reply 1502-4. 2003
  9. pmc Thermal stress and coral cover as drivers of coral disease outbreaks
    John F Bruno
    Department of Marine Sciences, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States of America
    PLoS Biol 5:e124. 2007
    ..Our results indicate that the frequency of temperature anomalies, which is predicted to increase in most tropical oceans, can increase the susceptibility of corals to disease, leading to outbreaks where corals are abundant...
  10. ncbi request reprint Porites ulcerative white spot disease: description, prevalence, and host range of a new coral disease affecting Indo-Pacific reefs
    Laurie J H Raymundo
    Silliman University Marine Laboratory, Dumaguete City 6200, Philippines
    Dis Aquat Organ 56:95-104. 2003
    ..Poritids are dominant Indo-Pacific reef builders; a disease targeting this genus could cause major shifts in community structure over time. This report contributes to the limited knowledge of PUWS impacts in this region...
  11. pmc Cellular responses in sea fan corals: granular amoebocytes react to pathogen and climate stressors
    Laura D Mydlarz
    Department of Biology, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, Texas, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 3:e1811. 2008
    ..In the Caribbean sea fan corals (Anthozoa, Alcyonacea: Gorgoniidae), the cell-based immune defenses are granular acidophilic amoebocytes, which are known to be involved in wound repair and histocompatibility...