BETTY CASEY

Summary

Affiliation: Cornell University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Neuroscience. Windows into the human brain
    B J Casey
    Sackler Institute for Developmental Psychobiology, Department of Psychiatry, Weill Medical College, Cornell University, New York, NY 10021, USA
    Science 296:1408-9. 2002
  2. ncbi request reprint Early development of subcortical regions involved in non-cued attention switching
    B J Casey
    Sackler Institute, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY 10021, USA
    Dev Sci 7:534-42. 2004
  3. ncbi request reprint MR quantitation of volume and diffusion changes in the developing brain
    Lijuan Zhang
    Department of Radiology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY 10021, USA
    AJNR Am J Neuroradiol 26:45-9. 2005
  4. pmc Special considerations for functional magnetic resonance imaging of pediatric populations
    Eleni Kotsoni
    Sackler Institute for the Developmental Psychobiology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 10021, USA
    J Magn Reson Imaging 23:877-86. 2006
  5. doi request reprint Treating the developing brain: implications from human imaging and mouse genetics
    B J Casey
    Sackler Institute for Developmental Psychology, Department of Psychiatry, Weill Cornell MedicalCollege, New York, New York 10065, USA
    Annu Rev Med 64:427-39. 2013
  6. ncbi request reprint Changes in cerebral functional organization during cognitive development
    B J Casey
    Sackler Institute for Developmental Psychobiology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, 1300 York Avenue, Box 140, New York, NY 10021, USA
    Curr Opin Neurobiol 15:239-44. 2005
  7. ncbi request reprint Imaging the developing brain: what have we learned about cognitive development?
    B J Casey
    Sackler Institute for Developmental Psychobiology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, 1300 York Avenue, Box 140, New York, NY 10021, USA
    Trends Cogn Sci 9:104-10. 2005
  8. pmc Brain-derived neurotrophic factor as a model system for examining gene by environment interactions across development
    B J Casey
    Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY 10065, USA
    Neuroscience 164:108-20. 2009
  9. pmc The adolescent brain
    B J Casey
    Sackler Institute, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, 1300 York Avenue, Box 140, New York, NY 10021, USA
    Ann N Y Acad Sci 1124:111-26. 2008
  10. ncbi request reprint Brain plasticity, learning, and developmental disabilities
    B J Casey
    Sackler Institute for Developmental Psychobiology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York 10021, USA
    Ment Retard Dev Disabil Res Rev 9:133-4. 2003

Detail Information

Publications58

  1. ncbi request reprint Neuroscience. Windows into the human brain
    B J Casey
    Sackler Institute for Developmental Psychobiology, Department of Psychiatry, Weill Medical College, Cornell University, New York, NY 10021, USA
    Science 296:1408-9. 2002
  2. ncbi request reprint Early development of subcortical regions involved in non-cued attention switching
    B J Casey
    Sackler Institute, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY 10021, USA
    Dev Sci 7:534-42. 2004
    ..These results suggest an important role of subcortical regions (i.e. caudate nucleus) in non-cued attention switching, with increasing recruitment of cortical regions with age...
  3. ncbi request reprint MR quantitation of volume and diffusion changes in the developing brain
    Lijuan Zhang
    Department of Radiology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY 10021, USA
    AJNR Am J Neuroradiol 26:45-9. 2005
    ..Brain volume and diffusion change during maturation. Quantitation of these changes may be helpful in understanding normal brain development. We used diffusion-weighted imaging to characterize the volumetric and diffusion changes in vivo...
  4. pmc Special considerations for functional magnetic resonance imaging of pediatric populations
    Eleni Kotsoni
    Sackler Institute for the Developmental Psychobiology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 10021, USA
    J Magn Reson Imaging 23:877-86. 2006
    ..Finally, we emphasize the importance of a converging methods approach in constraining and supporting interpretations of pediatric imaging results...
  5. doi request reprint Treating the developing brain: implications from human imaging and mouse genetics
    B J Casey
    Sackler Institute for Developmental Psychology, Department of Psychiatry, Weill Cornell MedicalCollege, New York, New York 10065, USA
    Annu Rev Med 64:427-39. 2013
    ..Based on these findings, we provide future directions for determining the efficacy of innovative therapies and preventive strategies for anxiety disorders as a function of age and potential genetic effects inferred from mice and humans...
  6. ncbi request reprint Changes in cerebral functional organization during cognitive development
    B J Casey
    Sackler Institute for Developmental Psychobiology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, 1300 York Avenue, Box 140, New York, NY 10021, USA
    Curr Opin Neurobiol 15:239-44. 2005
    ....
  7. ncbi request reprint Imaging the developing brain: what have we learned about cognitive development?
    B J Casey
    Sackler Institute for Developmental Psychobiology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, 1300 York Avenue, Box 140, New York, NY 10021, USA
    Trends Cogn Sci 9:104-10. 2005
    ..Brain regions associated with more basic functions such as sensory and motor processes mature first, followed by association areas involved in top-down control of behavior...
  8. pmc Brain-derived neurotrophic factor as a model system for examining gene by environment interactions across development
    B J Casey
    Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY 10065, USA
    Neuroscience 164:108-20. 2009
    ..The findings illustrate the use of a genetic mouse model that mimics the human polymorphism, to constrain the interpretation of gene-environment interactions across development in humans...
  9. pmc The adolescent brain
    B J Casey
    Sackler Institute, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, 1300 York Avenue, Box 140, New York, NY 10021, USA
    Ann N Y Acad Sci 1124:111-26. 2008
    ..This developmental pattern may be exacerbated in those adolescents prone to emotional reactivity, increasing the likelihood of poor outcomes...
  10. ncbi request reprint Brain plasticity, learning, and developmental disabilities
    B J Casey
    Sackler Institute for Developmental Psychobiology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York 10021, USA
    Ment Retard Dev Disabil Res Rev 9:133-4. 2003
    ..This issue reflects a sampling of current approaches to the study of brain plasticity, development and learning in typically and atypically developing humans and animals...
  11. pmc Imaging genetics and development: challenges and promises
    B J Casey
    Department of Psychiatry, Sackler Institute, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York, USA
    Hum Brain Mapp 31:838-51. 2010
    ..Each of these approaches alone, provide limited information on gene function in complex human behavior, but together, they are forming bridges between animal models and human psychiatric disorders...
  12. ncbi request reprint Dissociating striatal and hippocampal function developmentally with a stimulus-response compatibility task
    B J Casey
    Sackler Institute for Developmental Psychobiology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York 10021, USA
    J Neurosci 22:8647-52. 2002
    ....
  13. pmc The storm and stress of adolescence: insights from human imaging and mouse genetics
    B J Casey
    Sackler Institute for Developmental Psychobiology, Weil Cornell Medical College, 1300 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065, USA
    Dev Psychobiol 52:225-35. 2010
    ..Together, these studies provide a converging methods approach for understanding the highly variable stress and turmoil experienced in adolescence...
  14. pmc Adolescence: what do transmission, transition, and translation have to do with it?
    B J Casey
    Sackler Institute for Developmental Psychobiology, Weill Cornell Medical College, 1300 York Avenue, Box 140, New York, NY 10065, USA
    Neuron 67:749-60. 2010
    ..This review examines changes in explorative and emotive behaviors during the transition into and out of adolescence and the underlying neurobiological bases in the context of adaptive and maladaptive functions...
  15. pmc Behavioral and neural correlates of delay of gratification 40 years later
    B J Casey
    Sackler Institute for Developmental Psychobiology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY 10065, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108:14998-5003. 2011
    ....
  16. pmc Transitional and translational studies of risk for anxiety
    B J Casey
    Sackler Institute for Developmental Psychobiology, Weil Cornell Medical College, 1300 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065, USA
    Depress Anxiety 28:18-28. 2011
    ..Together, they reflect an emerging field of translational developmental neuroscience in forming important bridges between animal models of neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders...
  17. pmc Neurobiology of the adolescent brain and behavior: implications for substance use disorders
    B J Casey
    Sackler Institute for Developmental Psychobiology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY 10065, USA
    J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 49:1189-201; quiz 1285. 2010
    ..Understanding how the brain is changing during this period relative to childhood and adulthood and how these changes vary across individuals are key in predicting risk for later substance abuse and dependence...
  18. pmc Biological substrates of emotional reactivity and regulation in adolescence during an emotional go-nogo task
    Todd A Hare
    The Sackler Institute for Developmental Psychobiology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York, USA
    Biol Psychiatry 63:927-34. 2008
    ..Individual differences in emotional reactivity might put some teens at greater risk during this sensitive transition in development...
  19. ncbi request reprint Processing emotional facial expressions influences performance on a Go/NoGo task in pediatric anxiety and depression
    Cecile D Ladouceur
    Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, University of Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA
    J Child Psychol Psychiatry 47:1107-15. 2006
    ..This study investigated whether processing emotionally salient information such as emotional facial expressions influences the performance on a cognitive control task in pediatric anxiety and depression...
  20. pmc Prolonged institutional rearing is associated with atypically large amygdala volume and difficulties in emotion regulation
    Nim Tottenham
    Sackler Institute for Developmental Psychobiology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, USA
    Dev Sci 13:46-61. 2010
    ..These changes in limbic circuitry may underlie residual emotional and social problems experienced by children who have been internationally adopted...
  21. ncbi request reprint Parametric manipulation of conflict and response competition using rapid mixed-trial event-related fMRI
    S Durston
    Sackler Institute for Developmental Psychobiology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY 10021, USA
    Neuroimage 20:2135-41. 2003
    ....
  22. ncbi request reprint Intentional false responding shares neural substrates with response conflict and cognitive control
    Jennifer Maria Nuñez
    Department of Neurology and Neuroscience, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY 10021, USA
    Neuroimage 25:267-77. 2005
    ....
  23. pmc Contributions of the hippocampus and the striatum to simple association and frequency-based learning
    Dima Amso
    Sackler Institute for Developmental Psychobiology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, 1300 York Avenue, Box 140, New York, NY 10021, USA
    Neuroimage 27:291-8. 2005
    ..This work provides evidence of different neural mechanisms underlying learning based on simple frequencies versus associations within a single paradigm...
  24. ncbi request reprint Risk-taking and the adolescent brain: who is at risk?
    Adriana Galvan
    Sackler Institute for Developmental Psychobiology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY 10021, USA
    Dev Sci 10:F8-F14. 2007
    ....
  25. pmc A time of change: behavioral and neural correlates of adolescent sensitivity to appetitive and aversive environmental cues
    Leah H Somerville
    Sackler Institute for Developmental Psychobiology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY 10065, USA
    Brain Cogn 72:124-33. 2010
    ..Finally, we discuss other influences that may contribute to exaggerated reward and emotion processing associated with adolescence, including hormonal fluctuations and the role of the social environment...
  26. pmc Variant brain-derived neurotrophic factor Val66Met endophenotypes: implications for posttraumatic stress disorder
    Helena Frielingsdorf
    The Sackler Institute for Developmental Psychobiology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York 10065, USA
    Ann N Y Acad Sci 1208:150-7. 2010
    ..The aim of this paper is to review the available knowledge on the BDNF Val66Met SNP, with emphasis on anxiety- and fear-related endophenotypes and its potential implications for PTSD...
  27. pmc The aftermath of 9/11: effect of intensity and recency of trauma on outcome
    Barbara Ganzel
    Sackler Institute for Developmental Psychobiology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
    Emotion 7:227-38. 2007
    ..These data are consistent with a model of heightened amygdala reactivity following high-intensity trauma exposure, with relatively slow recovery...
  28. ncbi request reprint Neural and behavioral correlates of expectancy violations in attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder
    Sarah Durston
    Sackler Institute for Developmental Psychobiology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, USA
    J Child Psychol Psychiatry 48:881-9. 2007
    ..Therefore, we hypothesized that the ability to predict the occurrence of frequent events would be compromised in ADHD, as well as the ability to adapt behavior when expectancy was violated...
  29. ncbi request reprint Frontostriatal connectivity and its role in cognitive control in parent-child dyads with ADHD
    B J Casey
    Sackler Institute, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, 1300 York Ave, Box 140, New York, NY 10021, USA
    Am J Psychiatry 164:1729-36. 2007
    ..Few studies have examined the role of white matter tracts between these structures or the extent to which white matter tract myelination and regularity correlate in family members with the disorder...
  30. ncbi request reprint Differential cingulate and caudate activation following unexpected nonrewarding stimuli
    M C Davidson
    Sackler Institute for Devevelopmental Psychobiology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, 1300 York Avenue, Box 140, New York, NY 10021, USA
    Neuroimage 23:1039-45. 2004
    ....
  31. pmc Developmental neurobiology of cognitive control and motivational systems
    Leah H Somerville
    Sackler Institute for Developmental Psychobiology, Weill Cornell Medical College, NY, USA
    Curr Opin Neurobiol 20:236-41. 2010
    ....
  32. pmc Neuroanatomical abnormalities in adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder
    Amy Garrett
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Department of Psychiatry, Stanford University, CA 94305 5795, USA
    J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 47:1321-8. 2008
    ..However, findings are not always consistent, perhaps because of heterogeneous subject samples. Studying youths with documented familial ADHD provides an opportunity to examine a more homogeneous population...
  33. pmc The bivalent side of the nucleus accumbens
    Liat Levita
    Sackler Institute for Developmental Psychobiology, Institute of Psychiatry, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USA
    Neuroimage 44:1178-87. 2009
    ..Our results support the expanded bivalent view of NAcc function and call for expansion of current models of NAcc function that are solely focused on reward...
  34. pmc A genetic variant BDNF polymorphism alters extinction learning in both mouse and human
    Fatima Soliman
    The Sackler Institute for Developmental Psychobiology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY 10065, USA
    Science 327:863-6. 2010
    ..Thus, this variant BDNF allele may play a role in anxiety disorders showing impaired learning of cues that signal safety versus threat and in the efficacy of treatments that rely on extinction mechanisms, such as exposure therapy...
  35. pmc The NimStim set of facial expressions: judgments from untrained research participants
    Nim Tottenham
    Sackler Institute for Developmental Psychobiology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY 10021, USA
    Psychiatry Res 168:242-9. 2009
    ..The results lend empirical support for the validity and reliability of this set of facial expressions as determined by accurate identification of expressions and high intra-participant agreement across two testing sessions, respectively...
  36. pmc Psychosocial stress reversibly disrupts prefrontal processing and attentional control
    C Liston
    Department of Psychiatry, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, 1300 York Avenue, Box 140, New York, NY 10021, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 106:912-7. 2009
    ....
  37. pmc Dissociation of response conflict, attentional selection, and expectancy with functional magnetic resonance imaging
    B J Casey
    Sackler Institute, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY 10021, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 97:8728-33. 2000
    ..These data provide a systems-level approach in understanding integrated attentional networks...
  38. ncbi request reprint Altered emotional processing in pediatric anxiety, depression, and comorbid anxiety-depression
    Cecile D Ladouceur
    Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA
    J Abnorm Child Psychol 33:165-77. 2005
    ..Further, research is needed to replicate this study and delineate underlying neural mechanisms...
  39. ncbi request reprint Contributions of amygdala and striatal activity in emotion regulation
    Todd A Hare
    Sackler Institute, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, NY 10021, USA
    Biol Psychiatry 57:624-32. 2005
    ..Emotional information can facilitate or interfere with cognitive processes. In this study, we examined the influence of emotional information in biasing performance and the biological basis underlying this influence...
  40. ncbi request reprint Exploring genetic influences on cognition: emerging strategies for target validation and treatment optimization
    John A Fossella
    The Sackler Institute for Developmental Psychobiology, Weill Medical College Cornell University, 1300 York Ave, New York, NY 10021, USA
    Curr Drug Targets CNS Neurol Disord 2:357-62. 2003
    ..This review describes some well-known findings that are at the forefront of this interface. The progress already made indicates that the goals of the new initiative are well founded and achievable...
  41. ncbi request reprint Imaging the developing brain with fMRI
    M C Davidson
    Sackler Institute for Developmental Psychobiology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York 10021, USA
    Ment Retard Dev Disabil Res Rev 9:161-7. 2003
    ..These methodologies and their application to development and learning are discussed in the current paper...
  42. ncbi request reprint Differential patterns of striatal activation in young children with and without ADHD
    Sarah Durston
    Sackler Institute for Developmental Psychobiology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York 10021, USA
    Biol Psychiatry 53:871-8. 2003
    ..Cognitive control, defined as the ability to suppress inappropriate thoughts and actions, is compromised in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). This study examines the neural basis of this deficit...
  43. ncbi request reprint Amygdala response to fearful faces in anxious and depressed children
    K M Thomas
    Sackler Institute for Developmental Psychobiology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, 1300 York Ave, Box 140, Suite F 1332, New York, NY 10021
    Arch Gen Psychiatry 58:1057-63. 2001
    ..We hypothesized that children with anxiety and depression may show atypical amygdala responses to emotional stimuli...
  44. ncbi request reprint Sensitivity of prefrontal cortex to changes in target probability: a functional MRI study
    B J Casey
    Sackler Institute for Developmental Psychobiology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York 10021, USA
    Hum Brain Mapp 13:26-33. 2001
    ..Most importantly, these findings taken as a whole suggest that any simple theory of prefrontal cortex function must take into account the sensitivity of this region to changes in target probability...
  45. ncbi request reprint Structural and functional brain development and its relation to cognitive development
    B J Casey
    Department of Psychiatry, The Sackler Institute for Developmental Psychobiology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, 525 East 68th Street, Box 171, New York, NY 10021, USA
    Biol Psychol 54:241-57. 2000
    ..It is clear that innovative methods like fMRI together with MRI-based morphometry and nonhuman primate studies will transform our current understanding of human brain development and its relation to behavioral development...
  46. ncbi request reprint Frontostriatal microstructure modulates efficient recruitment of cognitive control
    Conor Liston
    Sackler Institute for Developmental Psychobiology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, 1300 York Avenue, Box 140, New York, NY 10021, USA
    Cereb Cortex 16:553-60. 2006
    ..These findings suggest that frontostriatal connectivity may contribute to developmental and individual differences in the efficient recruitment of cognitive control...
  47. ncbi request reprint The role of ventral frontostriatal circuitry in reward-based learning in humans
    Adriana Galvan
    Sackler Institute, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York 10021, USA
    J Neurosci 25:8650-6. 2005
    ..Our findings suggest discrete functions of regions within basal ganglia thalamocortical circuitry in adjusting behavior to maximize reward...
  48. ncbi request reprint Genes, brain, and behavior: bridging disciplines
    John A Fossella
    Sackler Institute, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, 1300 York Ave, Box 140, New York, NY 10021, USA
    Cogn Affect Behav Neurosci 6:1-8. 2006
    ..Alone, each of these approaches provides limited information on gene function in complex human behavior, but together, they are forming bridges between animal models and human psychiatric disorders...
  49. ncbi request reprint Earlier development of the accumbens relative to orbitofrontal cortex might underlie risk-taking behavior in adolescents
    Adriana Galvan
    The Sackler Institute for Developmental Psychobiology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York 10021, USA
    J Neurosci 26:6885-92. 2006
    ..These findings suggest that maturing subcortical systems become disproportionately activated relative to later maturing top-down control systems, biasing the adolescent's action toward immediate over long-term gains...
  50. ncbi request reprint Anterior cingulate and posterior parietal cortices are sensitive to dissociable forms of conflict in a task-switching paradigm
    Conor Liston
    Sackler Institute for Developmental Psychobiology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, 1300 York Avenue, Box 140, New York, New York 10021, USA
    Neuron 50:643-53. 2006
    ..These findings suggest that ACC and PPC may act in concert to detect dissociable forms of conflict and signal to DLPFC the need for increased control...
  51. ncbi request reprint The face behind the mask: a developmental study
    Nim Tottenham
    Sackler Institute for Developmental Psychobiology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, USA
    Dev Sci 9:288-94. 2006
    ....
  52. ncbi request reprint A shift from diffuse to focal cortical activity with development
    Sarah Durston
    Sackler Institute for Developmental Psychobiology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, USA
    Dev Sci 9:1-8. 2006
    ..Our longitudinal findings, relative to our cross-sectional ones, show attenuated activation in dorsolateral prefrontal cortical areas, paralleled by increased focal activation in ventral prefrontal regions related to task performance...
  53. ncbi request reprint What have we learned about cognitive development from neuroimaging?
    Sarah Durston
    Sackler Institute for Developmental Psychobiology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY 10021, USA
    Neuropsychologia 44:2149-57. 2006
    ..Finally, the relevance of normative studies for understanding neural and cognitive changes in developmental disorders is discussed...
  54. ncbi request reprint Clinical, imaging, lesion, and genetic approaches toward a model of cognitive control
    B J Casey
    Sackler Institute for Developmental Psychobiology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY 10021, USA
    Dev Psychobiol 40:237-54. 2002
    ....
  55. ncbi request reprint Amygdala response to facial expressions in children and adults
    K M Thomas
    Sackler Institute, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York 10021, USA
    Biol Psychiatry 49:309-16. 2001
    ..CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study to examine developmental differences in the amygdala response to facial expressions using functional magnetic resonance imaging...
  56. ncbi request reprint A shift from diffuse to focal cortical activity with development: the authors' reply
    Sarah Durston
    Sackler Institute for Developmental Psychobiology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, USA
    Dev Sci 9:18-20. 2006
  57. ncbi request reprint The effect of preceding context on inhibition: an event-related fMRI study
    S Durston
    Sackler Institute for Developmental Psychobiology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York, USA
    Neuroimage 16:449-53. 2002
    ..A model using the BOLD response in our data was used to verify that the effect of context was not an artifact of the randomization scheme used in the design...
  58. ncbi request reprint New potential leads in the biology and treatment of attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder
    B J Casey
    Sackler Institute for Developmental Psychobiology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York 10021, USA
    Curr Opin Neurol 20:119-24. 2007
    ..This review highlights recent neuroimaging and genetic studies of attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder that may inform biologically targeted interventions and treatments...

Research Grants18

  1. Development of Basic Components of Decision Making
    BETTY CASEY; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..The proposed studies are in response to RFA # DA-04-009 Behavioral and Cognitive Processes Related to Adolescent Drug Abuse. ..
  2. Brain Development Following Institutionalization
    BETTY CASEY; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..We will recruit a typically developing population of children to assess deviations or delays in the development of amygdala and hippocampal volume and function. ..
  3. Frontostriatal Development and Cognitive Control
    BETTY CASEY; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ....
  4. Development of Prediction and Reward Related Circuitry
    BETTY CASEY; Fiscal Year: 2004
    ..The proposed studies will lay the critical groundwork, both scientific and methodological, for subsequent studies on substance abuse in children. ..
  5. Functional neuroanatomical deficits in ADHD families
    BETTY CASEY; Fiscal Year: 2003
    ..Imaging will be performed at corresponding imaging sites at DUMC, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, and Stanford University respectively. ..