R L Canfield

Summary

Affiliation: Cornell University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Blood lead concentrations < 10 microg/dL and child intelligence at 6 years of age
    Todd A Jusko
    Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA
    Environ Health Perspect 116:243-8. 2008
  2. ncbi request reprint Information processing through the first year of life: a longitudinal study using the visual expectation paradigm
    R L Canfield
    Department of Human Development, Cornell University, USA
    Monogr Soc Res Child Dev 62:1-145. 1997
  3. ncbi request reprint Intellectual impairment in children with blood lead concentrations below 10 microg per deciliter
    Richard L Canfield
    Division of Nutritional Sciences, College of Human Ecology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
    N Engl J Med 348:1517-26. 2003
  4. ncbi request reprint Low-level lead exposure, executive functioning, and learning in early childhood
    Richard L Canfield
    Division of Nutritional Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850, USA
    Child Neuropsychol 9:35-53. 2003
  5. ncbi request reprint Impaired neuropsychological functioning in lead-exposed children
    Richard L Canfield
    Division of Nutritional Sciences, College of Human Ecology, Cornell University, Savage Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
    Dev Neuropsychol 26:513-40. 2004
  6. ncbi request reprint Deficits in cognitive function and achievement in Mexican first-graders with low blood lead concentrations
    Katarzyna Kordas
    Division of Nutritional Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
    Environ Res 100:371-86. 2006
  7. pmc Low-level environmental lead exposure and children's intellectual function: an international pooled analysis
    Bruce P Lanphear
    Cincinnati Children s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio 45229 3039, USA
    Environ Health Perspect 113:894-9. 2005
  8. pmc Comments on "Recent developments in low-level lead exposure and intellectual impairment in children"
    Todd A Jusko
    Environ Health Perspect 113:A16; author reply A16-7. 2005
  9. pmc Principles and practices of neurodevelopmental assessment in children: lessons learned from the Centers for Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research
    Kim N Dietrich
    University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Department of Environmental Health, and the Cincinnati Children s Environmental Health Center, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA
    Environ Health Perspect 113:1437-46. 2005
  10. ncbi request reprint Response to: "What is the meaning of non-linear dose-response relationships between blood lead concentrations and IQ?"
    Todd A Jusko
    Neurotoxicology 27:1123-5. 2006

Detail Information

Publications11

  1. pmc Blood lead concentrations < 10 microg/dL and child intelligence at 6 years of age
    Todd A Jusko
    Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA
    Environ Health Perspect 116:243-8. 2008
    ..Few studies provide data directly relevant to the question of whether blood lead concentrations < 10 microg/dL adversely affect children's cognitive function...
  2. ncbi request reprint Information processing through the first year of life: a longitudinal study using the visual expectation paradigm
    R L Canfield
    Department of Human Development, Cornell University, USA
    Monogr Soc Res Child Dev 62:1-145. 1997
    ..The unique strengths of the paradigm are discussed, and future directions are suggested for further developing the paradigm itself and for using it as a tool to study broad issues in infant cognition...
  3. ncbi request reprint Intellectual impairment in children with blood lead concentrations below 10 microg per deciliter
    Richard L Canfield
    Division of Nutritional Sciences, College of Human Ecology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
    N Engl J Med 348:1517-26. 2003
    ..483 micromol per liter), little is known about children's neurobehavioral functioning at lead concentrations below this level...
  4. ncbi request reprint Low-level lead exposure, executive functioning, and learning in early childhood
    Richard L Canfield
    Division of Nutritional Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850, USA
    Child Neuropsychol 9:35-53. 2003
    ....
  5. ncbi request reprint Impaired neuropsychological functioning in lead-exposed children
    Richard L Canfield
    Division of Nutritional Sciences, College of Human Ecology, Cornell University, Savage Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
    Dev Neuropsychol 26:513-40. 2004
    ..These findings indicate that the effects of pediatric lead exposure are not restricted to global indexes of general intellectual functioning, and executive processes may be at particular risk of lead-induced neurotoxicity...
  6. ncbi request reprint Deficits in cognitive function and achievement in Mexican first-graders with low blood lead concentrations
    Katarzyna Kordas
    Division of Nutritional Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
    Environ Res 100:371-86. 2006
    ..Together with other recent findings, these results add to the empirical base of support available for evaluating the adequacy of current screening guidelines and for motivating efforts at primary prevention of childhood lead exposure...
  7. pmc Low-level environmental lead exposure and children's intellectual function: an international pooled analysis
    Bruce P Lanphear
    Cincinnati Children s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio 45229 3039, USA
    Environ Health Perspect 113:894-9. 2005
    ..5 microg/dL (p = 0.015). We conclude that environmental lead exposure in children who have maximal blood lead levels < 7.5 microg/dL is associated with intellectual deficits...
  8. pmc Comments on "Recent developments in low-level lead exposure and intellectual impairment in children"
    Todd A Jusko
    Environ Health Perspect 113:A16; author reply A16-7. 2005
  9. pmc Principles and practices of neurodevelopmental assessment in children: lessons learned from the Centers for Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research
    Kim N Dietrich
    University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Department of Environmental Health, and the Cincinnati Children s Environmental Health Center, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA
    Environ Health Perspect 113:1437-46. 2005
    ..The human neurodevelopmental phenotype will be most clearly represented in models that include environmental chemical exposures, the social milieu, and complex human genetic characteristics that we are just beginning to understand...
  10. ncbi request reprint Response to: "What is the meaning of non-linear dose-response relationships between blood lead concentrations and IQ?"
    Todd A Jusko
    Neurotoxicology 27:1123-5. 2006
  11. pmc The conundrum of unmeasured confounding: Comment on: "Can some of the detrimental neurodevelopmental effects attributed to lead be due to pesticides? by Brian Gulson"
    Bruce P Lanphear
    Cincinnati Children s Environmental Health Center, Department of Pediatrics and of Environmental Health, Cincinnati Children s Hospital Medical Center, The University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA
    Sci Total Environ 396:196-200. 2008
    ..The alternative, to perpetually permit children to be exposed to lead and other emerging toxicants, is both absurd and unacceptable...