Eric Hall

Summary

Affiliation: Columbia University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Hemizygosity for Atm and Brca1 influence the balance between cell transformation and apoptosis
    Fengtao Su
    Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000, PR China
    Radiat Oncol 5:15. 2010
  2. ncbi request reprint The relative biological effectiveness of densely ionizing heavy-ion radiation for inducing ocular cataracts in wild type versus mice heterozygous for the ATM gene
    Eric J Hall
    Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University Medical Center, 630 West 168th Street, New York, NY 10032, USA
    Radiat Environ Biophys 45:99-104. 2006
  3. ncbi request reprint Genomic instability and bystander effects induced by high-LET radiation
    Eric J Hall
    Center for Radiological Research, and The Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, 630 West 168th Street, New York, NY 10032, USA
    Oncogene 22:7034-42. 2003
  4. ncbi request reprint Introduction to session I: Helical CT and cancer risk
    Eric J Hall
    Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University, 630 West 168th Street, New York, NY 10032, USA
    Pediatr Radiol 32:225-7. 2002
  5. ncbi request reprint Lessons we have learned from our children: cancer risks from diagnostic radiology
    Eric J Hall
    Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University, 630 West 168th Street, New York, NY 10032, USA
    Pediatr Radiol 32:700-6. 2002
  6. doi request reprint Cancer risks from diagnostic radiology
    E J Hall
    Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY 10032, USA
    Br J Radiol 81:362-78. 2008
  7. ncbi request reprint The weight of evidence does not support the suggestion that exposure to low doses of X rays increases longevity
    Eric J Hall
    Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University, 630 W 168th Street, New York, NY 10024, USA
    Radiology 229:18-9. 2003
  8. ncbi request reprint The impact of protons on the incidence of second malignancies in radiotherapy
    Eric J Hall
    Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University Medical Center, 630 West 168th Street, New York, NY 10032, USA
    Technol Cancer Res Treat 6:31-4. 2007
  9. ncbi request reprint Radiation-induced second cancers: the impact of 3D-CRT and IMRT
    Eric J Hall
    Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY 10032, USA
    Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 56:83-8. 2003
  10. ncbi request reprint The bystander effect
    Eric J Hall
    Columbia University, Center for Radiological Research, 630 West 168th Street, New York, NY 10032, USA
    Health Phys 85:31-5. 2003

Research Grants

  1. HIGH ENERGY IONS AND GENOMIC INSTABILITY
    Eric Hall; Fiscal Year: 2001

Detail Information

Publications56

  1. pmc Hemizygosity for Atm and Brca1 influence the balance between cell transformation and apoptosis
    Fengtao Su
    Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000, PR China
    Radiat Oncol 5:15. 2010
    ..To understand some of the mechanisms involved, we examined the role of monoallelic loss or Atm and Brca1 on cell transformation and apoptosis induced by radiation...
  2. ncbi request reprint The relative biological effectiveness of densely ionizing heavy-ion radiation for inducing ocular cataracts in wild type versus mice heterozygous for the ATM gene
    Eric J Hall
    Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University Medical Center, 630 West 168th Street, New York, NY 10032, USA
    Radiat Environ Biophys 45:99-104. 2006
    ..Haploinsufficiency for ATM results in an enhanced sensitivity to X-rays compared with the wild type, and this enhancement appears even larger after exposure to high-LET heavy ions...
  3. ncbi request reprint Genomic instability and bystander effects induced by high-LET radiation
    Eric J Hall
    Center for Radiological Research, and The Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, 630 West 168th Street, New York, NY 10032, USA
    Oncogene 22:7034-42. 2003
    ....
  4. ncbi request reprint Introduction to session I: Helical CT and cancer risk
    Eric J Hall
    Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University, 630 West 168th Street, New York, NY 10032, USA
    Pediatr Radiol 32:225-7. 2002
  5. ncbi request reprint Lessons we have learned from our children: cancer risks from diagnostic radiology
    Eric J Hall
    Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University, 630 West 168th Street, New York, NY 10032, USA
    Pediatr Radiol 32:700-6. 2002
    ..7 million of such procedures performed annually. Every effort is needed to minimize doses by an appropriate choice of peak kilovoltage (kVp) and milliampere-seconds (mAs), and at the same time to urge a more selective use of pediatric CT...
  6. doi request reprint Cancer risks from diagnostic radiology
    E J Hall
    Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY 10032, USA
    Br J Radiol 81:362-78. 2008
    ..A further issue is the increasing use of CT scans as a screening procedure in asymptomatic patients; at this time, the benefit/risk balance for any of the commonly suggested CT screening techniques has yet to be established...
  7. ncbi request reprint The weight of evidence does not support the suggestion that exposure to low doses of X rays increases longevity
    Eric J Hall
    Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University, 630 W 168th Street, New York, NY 10024, USA
    Radiology 229:18-9. 2003
  8. ncbi request reprint The impact of protons on the incidence of second malignancies in radiotherapy
    Eric J Hall
    Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University Medical Center, 630 West 168th Street, New York, NY 10032, USA
    Technol Cancer Res Treat 6:31-4. 2007
    ..Neutrons are highly effective at inducing second cancers and so, for the full potential of protons to be realized, spot scanning is essential...
  9. ncbi request reprint Radiation-induced second cancers: the impact of 3D-CRT and IMRT
    Eric J Hall
    Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY 10032, USA
    Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 56:83-8. 2003
    ..75% for patients surviving 10 years. The numbers may be larger for longer survival (or for younger patients), but the ratio should remain the same...
  10. ncbi request reprint The bystander effect
    Eric J Hall
    Columbia University, Center for Radiological Research, 630 West 168th Street, New York, NY 10032, USA
    Health Phys 85:31-5. 2003
    ..Bystander studies imply that the target for the biological effects of radiation is larger than the cell and this could make a simple linear extrapolation of radiation risks from high to low doses of questionable validity...
  11. ncbi request reprint The inaugural Frank Ellis Lecture--latrogenic cancer: the impact of intensity-modulated radiotherapy
    E J Hall
    Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University Medical Center, College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY 10032, USA
    Clin Oncol (R Coll Radiol) 18:277-82. 2006
    ..This is an advantage only if the proton machine uses a pencil scanning beam, as passive modulation of a scattering foil produces neutrons, which results in an effective dose to the patient higher than that characteristic of IMRT...
  12. ncbi request reprint Dose-painting by numbers: a feasible approach?
    Eric J Hall
    Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA
    Lancet Oncol 6:66. 2005
  13. ncbi request reprint Henry S. Kaplan Distinguished Scientist Award 2003. The crooked shall be made straight; dose-response relationships for carcinogenesis
    E J Hall
    Columbia University Center for Radiological Research 630 West 168th Street, P and S 11 230 New York NY 10032 USA
    Int J Radiat Biol 80:327-37. 2004
    ....
  14. ncbi request reprint Intensity-modulated radiation therapy, protons, and the risk of second cancers
    Eric J Hall
    Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University Medical Center, College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY 10032, USA
    Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 65:1-7. 2006
    ..The benefit of protons is only achieved if a scanning beam is used in which the doses are 10 times lower than with IMRT...
  15. doi request reprint Radiation biology for pediatric radiologists
    Eric J Hall
    Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY 10032, USA
    Pediatr Radiol 39:S57-64. 2009
    ..It is for this reason that every effort should be made to reduce the doses associated with procedures such as CT scans, particularly in children, in the spirit of ALARA...
  16. ncbi request reprint Genetic susceptibility to radiation
    E J Hall
    Columbia University Medical Center, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Center for Radiological Research, New York, NY 10032 3795, USA
    Adv Space Res 35:249-53. 2005
    ..An exciting possibility is the creation of double heterozygotes for pairs of mutated genes that function in the same signal transduction pathway, and consequently confer even greater radiosensitivity...
  17. pmc Atm heterozygous mice are more sensitive to radiation-induced cataracts than are their wild-type counterparts
    Basil V Worgul
    Eye Radiation and Environmental Research Laboratory and Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY 10032, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 99:9836-9. 2002
    ....
  18. ncbi request reprint Genomic instability, bystander effect, cytoplasmic irradiation and other phenomena that may achieve fame without fortune
    E J Hall
    Center for Radiological Research and Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY, USA
    Phys Med 17:21-5. 2001
    ....
  19. ncbi request reprint A microbeam study of DNA double-strand breaks in bystander primary human fibroblasts
    L B Smilenov
    Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons, 630 West 168th Street, New York, NY 10032, USA
    Radiat Prot Dosimetry 122:256-9. 2006
    ..The delay and persistence of the bystander response suggests a different mechanism of DSB induction in bystander cells than in directly irradiated cells...
  20. ncbi request reprint Mice heterozygous for the ATM gene are more sensitive to both X-ray and heavy ion exposure than are wildtypes
    B V Worgul
    Eye Radiation and Environmental Research Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA
    Adv Space Res 35:254-9. 2005
    ..This may have to be considered in the selection of individuals who will be exposed to both HZE particles and low-LET radiation as they may be predisposed to increased late normal tissue damage...
  21. ncbi request reprint The bystander response in C3H 10T1/2 cells: the influence of cell-to-cell contact
    S A Mitchell
    Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University, New York, New York 10032, USA
    Radiat Res 161:397-401. 2004
    ....
  22. ncbi request reprint Combined haploinsufficiency for ATM and RAD9 as a factor in cell transformation, apoptosis, and DNA lesion repair dynamics
    Lubomir B Smilenov
    Center for Radiological Research, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, 630 West 168th Street, New York, NY 10032, USA
    Cancer Res 65:933-8. 2005
    ....
  23. ncbi request reprint Microbeams: a potent mix of physics and biology. Summary of the 5th International Workshop on Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response
    D J Brenner
    Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University, 630 West 168th Street, New York, NY 10032, USA
    Radiat Prot Dosimetry 99:283-6. 2002
    ....
  24. ncbi request reprint Neutron-energy-dependent cell survival and oncogenic transformation
    R C Miller
    Center for Radiological Research, College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA
    J Radiat Res 40:53-9. 1999
    ..Based on calculations of dose-averaged LET, 0.35 MeV neutrons have the greatest LET and therefore would be expected to be more biologically effective than neutrons of greater or lesser energies...
  25. ncbi request reprint Do no harm--normal tissue effects
    E J Hall
    Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York 10032, USA
    Acta Oncol 40:913-6. 2001
    ..Radiation-induced sarcomas appear only in the heavily irradiated areas. These are small in number but appear with a very high relative risk...
  26. ncbi request reprint Molecular alterations in tumorigenic human bronchial and breast epithelial cells induced by high LET radiation
    T K Hei
    Center for Radiological Research, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA
    Adv Space Res 27:411-9. 2001
    ..The results are highly suggestive that functional alterations of these genes may be causally related to the carcinogenic process...
  27. ncbi request reprint Modest increased sensitivity to radiation oncogenesis in ATM heterozygous versus wild-type mammalian cells
    L B Smilenov
    Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University, 630 West 168th Street, New York, NY 10032, USA
    Cancer Res 61:5710-3. 2001
    ..From these data we suggest that Ataxia Telangiectasia heterozygotes could indeed represent a societally-significant radiosensitive human subpopulation...
  28. ncbi request reprint Gene amplification and microsatellite instability induced in tumorigenic human bronchial epithelial cells by alpha particles and heavy ions
    C Q Piao
    Center for Radiological Research, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, New York 10032, USA
    Radiat Res 155:263-267. 2001
    ..No significant difference in either PALA resistance or microsatellite instability was found in tumor cell lines that were induced by alpha particles compared to those induced by (56)Fe ions...
  29. ncbi request reprint Adaptive response and the bystander effect induced by radiation in C3H 10T(1/2) cells in culture
    S G Sawant
    Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University, New York, New York 10032, USA
    Radiat Res 156:177-80. 2001
    ..The magnitude of this bystander effect increased with the number of particles per cell. An adaptive dose of 2 cGy of gamma rays, delivered 6 h beforehand, canceled out about half of the bystander effect produced by the alpha particles...
  30. ncbi request reprint The radiation-induced bystander effect for clonogenic survival
    S G Sawant
    Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University, New York, New York 10032, USA
    Radiat Res 157:361-4. 2002
    ..The biological effect was studied in the neomycin-resistant V79 cells after selective removal of the hit cells with geneticin treatment...
  31. ncbi request reprint Bystander effect and adaptive response in C3H 10T(1/2) cells
    S A Mitchell
    Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA
    Int J Radiat Biol 80:465-72. 2004
    ..To address the relationship between the bystander effect and the adaptive response that can compete to impact on the dose-response curve at low doses...
  32. pmc The oncogenic potential of a combination of hyperthermia and chemotherapy agents
    K Komatsu
    Department of Radiation Oncology, College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University, New York, NY 10032
    Br J Cancer 57:59-63. 1988
    ..The modulating effects of heat on drug-induced transformation incidence appeared to be independent of whether application of heat and drug was concurrent or sequential...
  33. ncbi request reprint The bystander effect in radiation oncogenesis: I. Transformation in C3H 10T1/2 cells in vitro can be initiated in the unirradiated neighbors of irradiated cells
    S G Sawant
    Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University, New York, New York 10032, USA
    Radiat Res 155:397-401. 2001
    ..e., that unirradiated cells are responding to damage induced in irradiated cells. This bystander effect in a biological system of relevance to carcinogenesis could have significant implications for risk estimation for low-dose radiation...
  34. ncbi request reprint Scientific view of low-level radiation risks
    E J Hall
    Center for Radiological Research, College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University, New York, NY 10032
    Radiographics 11:509-18. 1991
    ..The balance of risk versus benefit in diagnostic radiology is heavily weighted toward benefit, but the risks are there, and constant efforts are needed to reduce radiation doses to the minimum necessary...
  35. ncbi request reprint Mortality patterns in British and US radiologists: what can we really conclude?
    D J Brenner
    Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University, 630 West 168th St, New York, NY 10032, USA
    Br J Radiol 76:1-2. 2003
  36. ncbi request reprint Mechanisms of radiation-induced neoplastic transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells
    Y L Zhao
    Center for Radiological Research, College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University, New York, New York 10032, USA
    Radiat Res 155:230-234. 2001
    ....
  37. ncbi request reprint Failla Memorial Lecture. From beans to genes--back to the future
    E J Hall
    Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, New York 10032
    Radiat Res 129:235-49. 1992
    ..Radiation-induced oncogenic transformation in C3H 10T1/2 cells has been shown to be due to a dominant acting transforming gene, which has been isolated and is in the process of being characterized and sequenced by Greg Freyer...
  38. ncbi request reprint Telomere stability correlates with longevity of human beings exposed to ionizing radiations
    Girdhar G Sharma
    Radiation and Cancer Biology Division, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63108, USA
    Oncol Rep 10:1733-6. 2003
    ....
  39. ncbi request reprint Cancer caused by x-rays--a random event?
    Eric J Hall
    Lancet Oncol 8:369-70. 2007
  40. ncbi request reprint Demonstration of a radiation-induced bystander effect for low dose low LET beta-particles
    Rudranath Persaud
    Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY 10032, USA
    Radiat Environ Biophys 46:395-400. 2007
    ..The results of this study will address the relevant issues of actual target size and radiation quality, and are likely to have a significant impact on our current understanding of radiation risk assessment...
  41. ncbi request reprint Biological responses in known bystander cells relative to known microbeam-irradiated cells
    Brian Ponnaiya
    Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University, New York, New York 10032, USA
    Radiat Res 162:426-32. 2004
    ..They indicate that the phenomenon has a quantitative basis and imply that the target for radiation effects cannot be considered to be the individual cell...
  42. ncbi request reprint Mrad9 and atm haploinsufficiency enhance spontaneous and X-ray-induced cataractogenesis in mice
    Norman J Kleiman
    Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY 10032, USA
    Radiat Res 168:567-73. 2007
    ..These findings demonstrate that Mrad9 and Atm are important determinants of lens opacification and, given the roles of Atm and Rad9 in maintaining genomic stability, are consistent with a genotoxic basis for radiation cataractogenesis...
  43. ncbi request reprint Computed tomography--an increasing source of radiation exposure
    David J Brenner
    Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY 10032, USA
    N Engl J Med 357:2277-84. 2007
  44. doi request reprint Secondary neutrons in clinical proton radiotherapy: a charged issue
    David J Brenner
    Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University Medical Center, NY 10032, USA
    Radiother Oncol 86:165-70. 2008
    ..We discuss here the neutron doses involved, and the associated potential second cancer risks, with an emphasis on the uncertainties involved...
  45. ncbi request reprint Antiprotons for radiotherapy?
    Eric J Hall
    Radiother Oncol 81:231-2. 2006
  46. ncbi request reprint Interaction between radiation-induced adaptive response and bystander mutagenesis in mammalian cells
    Hongning Zhou
    Center for Radiological Research, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, New York 10032, USA
    Radiat Res 160:512-6. 2003
    ..Results from the present study address some of the pressing issues regarding both the actual target size and the radiation dose response and can improve on our current understanding of radiation risk assessment...
  47. ncbi request reprint Radiation oncology: a century of achievements
    Jacques Bernier
    Department of Radio Oncology, Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, CH 6504 Bellinzona, Switzerland
    Nat Rev Cancer 4:737-47. 2004
    ....
  48. ncbi request reprint Multiple gene effects in radiation oncogenesis
    Eric J Hall
    Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, USA
    Radiat Res 163:697-8. 2005
  49. ncbi request reprint Prostate radiotherapy is associated with second cancers in many organs, not just the colorectum
    David J Brenner
    Gastroenterology 129:773-4; author reply 774-5. 2005
  50. ncbi request reprint Ionizing radiation induces DNA double-strand breaks in bystander primary human fibroblasts
    Mykyta V Sokolov
    Department of Nuclear Medicine, Clinical Center, NIH, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Oncogene 24:7257-65. 2005
    ..These studies show that H2AX phosphorylation is an early step in the bystander effect and that the DNA DSBs underlying gamma-H2AX focus formation may be responsible for its downstream manifestations...
  51. ncbi request reprint Assessment of low linear energy transfer radiation-induced bystander mutagenesis in a three-dimensional culture model
    Rudranath Persaud
    Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York 10032, USA
    Cancer Res 65:9876-82. 2005
    ..The results of this study will address the relevant issues of actual target size and radiation quality and are likely to have a significant effect on our current understanding of radiation risk assessment...
  52. ncbi request reprint Cancer survivorship--genetic susceptibility and second primary cancers: research strategies and recommendations
    Lois B Travis
    Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    J Natl Cancer Inst 98:15-25. 2006
    ..These research areas warrant high priority to promote NCI's goal of eliminating pain and suffering related to cancer...
  53. ncbi request reprint Risk of cancer from diagnostic X-rays
    David J Brenner
    Lancet 363:2192; author reply 2192-3. 2004
  54. pmc Cancer risks attributable to low doses of ionizing radiation: assessing what we really know
    David J Brenner
    Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University, 630 West 168th Street, New York, NY 10032, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 100:13761-6. 2003
    ..This linearity assumption is not necessarily the most conservative approach, and it is likely that it will result in an underestimate of some radiation-induced cancer risks and an overestimate of others...
  55. ncbi request reprint Toward a consensus on radiobiology teaching to radiation oncology residents
    Joseph R Dynlacht
    Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202, USA
    Radiat Res 157:599-606. 2002
    ....
  56. ncbi request reprint Re: Bladder cancer risk following primary and adjuvant external beam radiation for prostate cancer
    David J Brenner
    J Urol 175:788-9; author reply 789. 2006

Research Grants5

  1. HIGH ENERGY IONS AND GENOMIC INSTABILITY
    Eric Hall; Fiscal Year: 2001
    ....