Ming Tan

Summary

Affiliation: Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc The formation of P particle increased immunogenicity of norovirus P protein
    Ming Tan
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Cincinnati Children s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH 45229, USA
    Immunology 136:28-9. 2012
  2. pmc Elucidation of strain-specific interaction of a GII-4 norovirus with HBGA receptors by site-directed mutagenesis study
    Ming Tan
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Cincinnati Children s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH 45229 3039, USA
    Virology 379:324-34. 2008
  3. pmc Spike protein VP8* of human rotavirus recognizes histo-blood group antigens in a type-specific manner
    Pengwei Huang
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Cincinnati Children s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA
    J Virol 86:4833-43. 2012
  4. pmc Noroviral P particle: structure, function and applications in virus-host interaction
    Ming Tan
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Cincinnati Children s Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45229 3039, USA
    Virology 382:115-23. 2008
  5. pmc Norovirus and histo-blood group antigens: demonstration of a wide spectrum of strain specificities and classification of two major binding groups among multiple binding patterns
    Pengwei Huang
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Cincinnati Children s Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45229 3039, USA
    J Virol 79:6714-22. 2005
  6. pmc Rotavirus VP8*: phylogeny, host range, and interaction with histo-blood group antigens
    Yang Liu
    Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA
    J Virol 86:9899-910. 2012
  7. pmc Conservation of carbohydrate binding interfaces: evidence of human HBGA selection in norovirus evolution
    Ming Tan
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Cincinnati Children s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, USA
    PLoS ONE 4:e5058. 2009
  8. pmc Polyvalent complexes for vaccine development
    Leyi Wang
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Cincinnati Children s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH 45229 3039, USA
    Biomaterials 34:4480-92. 2013
  9. pmc Norovirus P particle: a subviral nanoparticle for vaccine development against norovirus, rotavirus and influenza virus
    Ming Tan
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Cincinnati Children s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45229 3039, USA
    Nanomedicine (Lond) 7:889-97. 2012
  10. pmc C-terminal arginine cluster is essential for receptor binding of norovirus capsid protein
    Ming Tan
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Cincinnati Children s Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45229 3039, USA
    J Virol 80:7322-31. 2006

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications29

  1. pmc The formation of P particle increased immunogenicity of norovirus P protein
    Ming Tan
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Cincinnati Children s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH 45229, USA
    Immunology 136:28-9. 2012
    ..It emphasizes the importance of P particle formation in the immune enhancement of the vaccine and methods for production/verification of high quality P particles which may be easily neglected by researchers...
  2. pmc Elucidation of strain-specific interaction of a GII-4 norovirus with HBGA receptors by site-directed mutagenesis study
    Ming Tan
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Cincinnati Children s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH 45229 3039, USA
    Virology 379:324-34. 2008
    ..Taken together, our study provides new insights into the carbohydrate/capsid interactions which are a valuable complement to the atomic structures in understanding the virus/host interaction and in the future design of antiviral agents...
  3. pmc Spike protein VP8* of human rotavirus recognizes histo-blood group antigens in a type-specific manner
    Pengwei Huang
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Cincinnati Children s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA
    J Virol 86:4833-43. 2012
    ..Our results suggest that the spike protein VP8* of RVs is involved in the recognition of human HBGAs that may function as ligands or receptors for RV attachment to host cells...
  4. pmc Noroviral P particle: structure, function and applications in virus-host interaction
    Ming Tan
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Cincinnati Children s Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45229 3039, USA
    Virology 382:115-23. 2008
    ..The P particles are easily produced in E. coli and yeast and are stable, which are potentially useful for a broad application including vaccine development against noroviruses...
  5. pmc Norovirus and histo-blood group antigens: demonstration of a wide spectrum of strain specificities and classification of two major binding groups among multiple binding patterns
    Pengwei Huang
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Cincinnati Children s Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45229 3039, USA
    J Virol 79:6714-22. 2005
    ..The high polymorphism of the human HBGA system, the involvement of multiple epitopes, and the typical protein/carbohydrate interaction between norovirus VLPs and HBGAs provide an explanation for the virus-ligand binding diversities...
  6. pmc Rotavirus VP8*: phylogeny, host range, and interaction with histo-blood group antigens
    Yang Liu
    Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA
    J Virol 86:9899-910. 2012
    ..Our study suggests that HBGAs play an important role in RV infection and evolution...
  7. pmc Conservation of carbohydrate binding interfaces: evidence of human HBGA selection in norovirus evolution
    Ming Tan
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Cincinnati Children s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, USA
    PLoS ONE 4:e5058. 2009
    ..Our hypothesis is that, if HBGAs are the viral receptors necessary for norovirus infection and spread, their binding interfaces should be under a selection pressure in the evolution of noroviruses...
  8. pmc Polyvalent complexes for vaccine development
    Leyi Wang
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Cincinnati Children s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH 45229 3039, USA
    Biomaterials 34:4480-92. 2013
    ..Therefore, our polyvalent complex system provides a new strategy for novel vaccine development and may find various applications throughout biomedicine...
  9. pmc Norovirus P particle: a subviral nanoparticle for vaccine development against norovirus, rotavirus and influenza virus
    Ming Tan
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Cincinnati Children s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45229 3039, USA
    Nanomedicine (Lond) 7:889-97. 2012
    ..This article summarizes the discovery, structure, development and applications of the P particles as a vaccine against NoVs, as well as a vaccine platform against rotavirus, influenza virus and possibly other pathogens in the future...
  10. pmc C-terminal arginine cluster is essential for receptor binding of norovirus capsid protein
    Ming Tan
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Cincinnati Children s Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45229 3039, USA
    J Virol 80:7322-31. 2006
    ..3 kDa (Norwalk virus) or 34.3 kDa (VA387), similar to the soluble P protein found in vivo. Our findings imply that the proteolytic process could be a necessary step for norovirus replication in the host...
  11. pmc Terminal modifications of norovirus P domain resulted in a new type of subviral particles, the small P particles
    Ming Tan
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Cincinnati Children s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH 45229 3039, USA
    Virology 410:345-52. 2011
    ..The small P particles may also be a useful alternative in study of norovirus-host interaction and vaccine development for noroviruses...
  12. pmc Norovirus-host interaction: multi-selections by human histo-blood group antigens
    Ming Tan
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Cincinnati Children s Hospital Medical Center, OH 45229 3039, USA
    Trends Microbiol 19:382-8. 2011
    ..A model of this multi-selection of NoVs by HBGAs is proposed...
  13. pmc Structural basis for the receptor binding specificity of Norwalk virus
    Weiming Bu
    Division of Developmental Biology, Cincinnati Children s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH 45229, USA
    J Virol 82:5340-7. 2008
    ..The A-trisaccharide binding mode seen in the NV P domain complex cannot be sterically accommodated in the VA387 P domain...
  14. ncbi request reprint Human milk contains elements that block binding of noroviruses to human histo-blood group antigens in saliva
    Xi Jiang
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Center for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Department of Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children s Hospital Medical Center and University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio 45229 3039, USA
    J Infect Dis 190:1850-9. 2004
    ..Secretor and Lewis, but not A or B antigens, were present in human milk and were responsible for blocking NV binding to receptors and therefore are likely to be decoy receptors that protect breast-fed infants from NV infection...
  15. pmc A candidate dual vaccine against influenza and noroviruses
    Ming Xia
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Cincinnati Children s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH 45229, USA
    Vaccine 29:7670-7. 2011
    ..These results suggest that the P particle-M2e chimera can be used as dual vaccine against both noroviruses and influenza viruses...
  16. pmc The p domain of norovirus capsid protein forms a subviral particle that binds to histo-blood group antigen receptors
    Ming Tan
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Cincinnati Children s Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Ave, Cincinnati, OH 45229 3039, USA
    J Virol 79:14017-30. 2005
    ..The easy production of the P particle and its strong binding to HBGAs suggest that the P particle is useful in studying pathogenesis and morphogenesis of norovirus and candidates for antiviral or vaccine development...
  17. pmc Norovirus P particle, a novel platform for vaccine development and antibody production
    Ming Tan
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Cincinnati Children s Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45229 3039, USA
    J Virol 85:753-64. 2011
    ..The P particle-VP8 chimeras may serve as a dual vaccine against both rotavirus and norovirus...
  18. ncbi request reprint Norovirus and its histo-blood group antigen receptors: an answer to a historical puzzle
    Ming Tan
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Cincinnati Children s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, USA
    Trends Microbiol 13:285-93. 2005
    ..This has been shown by their genetic and structural variations, which explains why norovirus-associated diseases are so common and widespread in every population worldwide...
  19. doi request reprint Outbreak studies of a GII-3 and a GII-4 norovirus revealed an association between HBGA phenotypes and viral infection
    Ming Tan
    Divisions of Infectious Diseases, Cincinnati Children s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio 45229 3039, USA
    J Med Virol 80:1296-301. 2008
    ..While the nonsecretor phenotype appears naturally resistant to these two strains, additional determinants on the HBGAs also may play roles in host range of the two strains...
  20. ncbi request reprint Norovirus-host interaction: implications for disease control and prevention
    Ming Tan
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Cincinnati Children s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45229 3039, USA
    Expert Rev Mol Med 9:1-22. 2007
    ..This review summarises and discusses recent advances and highlights implications for future studies in the control and prevention of NV gastroenteritis...
  21. ncbi request reprint E. coli-expressed recombinant norovirus capsid proteins maintain authentic antigenicity and receptor binding capability
    Ming Tan
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Cincinnati Children s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio 45229 3039, USA
    J Med Virol 74:641-9. 2004
    ....
  22. pmc Norovirus P particle efficiently elicits innate, humoral and cellular immunity
    Hao Fang
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Cincinnati Children s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 8:e63269. 2013
    ..Since the P particle is highly effective for both humoral and cellular immune responses and easily produced in Escherichia coli (E. coli), it is a good choice of vaccine against NoVs and a vaccine platform against other diseases...
  23. ncbi request reprint Norovirus gastroenteritis, increased understanding and future antiviral options
    Ming Tan
    Cincinnati Children s Hospital Medical Center, Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45229 3039, USA
    Curr Opin Investig Drugs 9:146-51. 2008
    ..This review summarizes new developments in the treatment of norovirus gastroenteritis and discusses future research directions...
  24. doi request reprint A dual chicken IgY against rotavirus and norovirus
    Ying chun Dai
    Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China
    Antiviral Res 97:293-300. 2013
    ..Collectively, our data suggested that the P-VP8(∗) based IgY could serve as a practical approach against both NoV and RV...
  25. pmc Two gastroenteritis outbreaks caused by GII Noroviruses: host susceptibility and HBGA phenotypes
    Miao Jin
    National Institute for Viral Disease Control and Prevention, China CDC, Beijing, China
    PLoS ONE 8:e58605. 2013
    ..However, No preference of HBGAs was observed in the GII.4 outbreak. The observation that nonsecretors were infected in both outbreaks differed from the previous results that nonsecretors are resistant to these two GII NoVs...
  26. pmc The P domain of norovirus capsid protein forms dimer and binds to histo-blood group antigen receptors
    Ming Tan
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Cincinnati Children s Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45229 3039, USA
    J Virol 78:6233-42. 2004
    ..The high yield and easy production of the recombinant P protein in the Escherichia coli expression system will provide a simple approach to this goal...
  27. pmc Inhibition of Histo-blood Group Antigen Binding as a Novel Strategy to Block Norovirus Infections
    Xu Fu Zhang
    Divisions of Infectious Diseases, Cincinnati Children s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio, United States of America School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China
    PLoS ONE 8:e69379. 2013
    ..Interestingly, 4 of the top-5 compounds shared the basic structure of cyclopenta [a] dimethyl phenanthren, indicating a promising structural template for further improvement by rational design. ..
  28. ncbi request reprint The telomeric protein Rap1 is conserved in vertebrates and is expressed from a bidirectional promoter positioned between the Rap1 and KARS genes
    Ming Tan
    Department of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry and Microbiology, College of Medicine, University of Cincinnati Medical Center, PO Box 524, 231 Albert Sabin Way, Cincinnati, OH 45267, USA
    Gene 323:1-10. 2003
    ..Analysis of human Rap1 and KARS expressed sequence tags (ESTs) indicated that this localization of TATA-less promoters to the intergenic spacer is a conserved feature of the Rap1-KARS locus...
  29. pmc Mutations within the P2 domain of norovirus capsid affect binding to human histo-blood group antigens: evidence for a binding pocket
    Ming Tan
    Division of Infectious Diseases and Division of Pediatric Informatics, Cincinnati Children s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio 45229, USA
    J Virol 77:12562-71. 2003
    ..Taken together, our data indicate that the binding pocket likely exists on NOR capsids. Direct evidence of this hypothesis requires crystallography studies...