D G Jacobs

Summary

Affiliation: Carolinas Medical Center
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Abdominal CT scanning for trauma: how low can we go?
    D G Jacobs
    Department of Surgery and Emergency Medicine, Carolinas Medical Center, P O Box 32861, Charlotte, NC 28232 2861, USA
    Injury 31:337-43. 2000
  2. ncbi request reprint Practice management guidelines for geriatric trauma: the EAST Practice Management Guidelines Work Group
    David G Jacobs
    Carolina Medical Center, Charlotte, North Carolina 28238, USA
    J Trauma 54:391-416. 2003
  3. ncbi request reprint Safety and accuracy of bedside carbon dioxide cavography for insertion of inferior vena cava filters in the intensive care unit
    R F Sing
    Department of Surgery, Carolinas Medical Center, Charlotte, NC, USA
    J Am Coll Surg 192:168-71. 2001
  4. ncbi request reprint Bedside insertion of inferior vena cava filters in the intensive care unit
    R F Sing
    Department of Surgery, Carolinas Medical Center, Charlotte, NC, USA
    J Am Coll Surg 192:570-5; discussion 575-6. 2001
  5. ncbi request reprint Laparoscopic repair of a ruptured diaphragm secondary to blunt trauma
    C H Smith
    Department of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, Carolinas Medical Center, 1000 Blythe Boulevard, Charlotte, NC 28203, USA
    Surg Endosc 14:501-2. 2000
  6. ncbi request reprint Blunt traumatic rupture of the thoracic aorta: a report of an unusual mechanism of injury
    G A Answini
    Department of General Surgery, Carolinas Medical Center, Charlotte, NC, USA
    Am J Emerg Med 19:579-82. 2001
  7. ncbi request reprint Extended interval for retrieval of vena cava filters is safe and may maximize protection against pulmonary embolism
    Dimitrios Stefanidis
    The F H Sammy Ross, Jr Trauma Center and The Carolinas Laparoscopic and Advanced Surgery Program, Department of Surgery, Carolinas Medical Center, Charlotte, NC, USA
    Am J Surg 192:789-94. 2006
  8. ncbi request reprint Utility of neurosurgical consultation for mild traumatic brain injury
    Toan Huynh
    F H Sammy Ross Jr Trauma Center, Carolinas Medical Center, Charlotte, North Carolina 28232 2861, USA
    Am Surg 72:1162-5; discussion1166-7. 2006
  9. ncbi request reprint Comment on "Damage control surgery prior to organ harvesting"
    William W Hope
    J Trauma 62:1535; author reply 1535-6. 2007
  10. ncbi request reprint Audience response system technology improves accuracy and reliability of trauma outcome judgments
    David G Jacobs
    Department of Surgery, F H Sammy Ross Jr Trauma Center, Carolinas Medical Center, Charlotte, North Carolina 28232 2861, USA
    J Trauma 61:135-41; discussion 141-3. 2006

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications15

  1. ncbi request reprint Abdominal CT scanning for trauma: how low can we go?
    D G Jacobs
    Department of Surgery and Emergency Medicine, Carolinas Medical Center, P O Box 32861, Charlotte, NC 28232 2861, USA
    Injury 31:337-43. 2000
    ..We developed a practice management guideline for blunt abdominal trauma intended to reduce the percentage of negative CT scans, yet minimize delayed recognition of injury and non-therapeutic laparotomy...
  2. ncbi request reprint Practice management guidelines for geriatric trauma: the EAST Practice Management Guidelines Work Group
    David G Jacobs
    Carolina Medical Center, Charlotte, North Carolina 28238, USA
    J Trauma 54:391-416. 2003
  3. ncbi request reprint Safety and accuracy of bedside carbon dioxide cavography for insertion of inferior vena cava filters in the intensive care unit
    R F Sing
    Department of Surgery, Carolinas Medical Center, Charlotte, NC, USA
    J Am Coll Surg 192:168-71. 2001
    ..CONCLUSIONS: Carbon dioxide as a contrast agent is safe and provides accurate determination of vena caval diameter and anatomy. Carbon dioxide should be considered the contrast agent of choice in critically ill patients...
  4. ncbi request reprint Bedside insertion of inferior vena cava filters in the intensive care unit
    R F Sing
    Department of Surgery, Carolinas Medical Center, Charlotte, NC, USA
    J Am Coll Surg 192:570-5; discussion 575-6. 2001
    ..CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate the safety and efficacy of IVCF insertion at the bedside in the ICU. This method offers less resource use and more safety for critically ill patients, avoiding the hazards of intrahospital transport...
  5. ncbi request reprint Laparoscopic repair of a ruptured diaphragm secondary to blunt trauma
    C H Smith
    Department of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, Carolinas Medical Center, 1000 Blythe Boulevard, Charlotte, NC 28203, USA
    Surg Endosc 14:501-2. 2000
    ..We conclude that laparoscopic exploration and repair of a ruptured diaphragm in a bluntly injured patient is a safe and effective option in selected cases...
  6. ncbi request reprint Blunt traumatic rupture of the thoracic aorta: a report of an unusual mechanism of injury
    G A Answini
    Department of General Surgery, Carolinas Medical Center, Charlotte, NC, USA
    Am J Emerg Med 19:579-82. 2001
    ..Several potential pathophysiologic mechanisms of BTAR are discussed...
  7. ncbi request reprint Extended interval for retrieval of vena cava filters is safe and may maximize protection against pulmonary embolism
    Dimitrios Stefanidis
    The F H Sammy Ross, Jr Trauma Center and The Carolinas Laparoscopic and Advanced Surgery Program, Department of Surgery, Carolinas Medical Center, Charlotte, NC, USA
    Am J Surg 192:789-94. 2006
    ..The aim of the current study was to assess the safety of this approach...
  8. ncbi request reprint Utility of neurosurgical consultation for mild traumatic brain injury
    Toan Huynh
    F H Sammy Ross Jr Trauma Center, Carolinas Medical Center, Charlotte, North Carolina 28232 2861, USA
    Am Surg 72:1162-5; discussion1166-7. 2006
    ..In this era of limited resources, trauma patients who present with a GCS score of 15 after mild TBI can be safely managed without neurosurgical consultation, even in the presence of an abnormal head CT scan...
  9. ncbi request reprint Comment on "Damage control surgery prior to organ harvesting"
    William W Hope
    J Trauma 62:1535; author reply 1535-6. 2007
  10. ncbi request reprint Audience response system technology improves accuracy and reliability of trauma outcome judgments
    David G Jacobs
    Department of Surgery, F H Sammy Ross Jr Trauma Center, Carolinas Medical Center, Charlotte, North Carolina 28232 2861, USA
    J Trauma 61:135-41; discussion 141-3. 2006
    ..Incorporation of Audience Response System (ARS) technology into trauma PI should result in improved outcome assessments...
  11. ncbi request reprint Practice management guidelines for nutritional support of the trauma patient
    David G Jacobs
    Department of Surgery, Carolinas Medical Center, Charlotte, North Carolina, USA
    J Trauma 57:660-78; discussion 679. 2004
  12. ncbi request reprint Age, blood transfusion, and survival after trauma
    Gamal Mostafa
    Department of Surgery, Carolinas Medical Center, Charlotte, North Carolina 28203, USA
    Am Surg 70:357-63. 2004
    ..Furthermore, mean PCTV for all survivors decreased progressively with advancing age. No patient >75 years with a PCTV > 12 units survived. Age and PCTV act independently, yet synergistically to increase mortality following injury...
  13. ncbi request reprint Special considerations in geriatric injury
    David G Jacobs
    Department of Surgery, Carolinas Medical Center, Charlotte, North Carolina 28232, USA
    Curr Opin Crit Care 9:535-9. 2003
    ..A thorough understanding of the causes for these disparate outcomes is critical if successful strategies and treatments for this unique patient population are to be developed...
  14. ncbi request reprint Positive end-expiratory pressure alters intracranial and cerebral perfusion pressure in severe traumatic brain injury
    Toan Huynh
    Department of Surgery, Division of Trauma Surgical Critical Care, Carolinas Medical Center, Charlotte, North Carolina 28232, USA
    J Trauma 53:488-92; discussion 492-3. 2002
    ..Increases in PEEP may lead to reduced CPP. We hypothesized that increases in PEEP are associated with compromised hemodynamics and altered cerebral perfusion...
  15. doi request reprint Optimal management strategy for incidental findings in trauma patients: an initiative for midlevel providers
    Toan T Huynh
    F H Sammy Ross Jr Trauma Center, Carolinas Medical Center, Charlotte, North Carolina 28232 2861, USA
    J Trauma 65:331-4; discussion 335-6. 2008
    ..Midlevel providers (MLP) can help streamline this process. We initiated a care plan in which MLPs conducted all tertiary surveys and coordinated follow-ups for incidental findings...