Paul W K Rothemund

Summary

Affiliation: California Institute of Technology
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Design and characterization of programmable DNA nanotubes
    Paul W K Rothemund
    Department of Computer Science, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125, USA
    J Am Chem Soc 126:16344-52. 2004
  2. ncbi request reprint Folding DNA to create nanoscale shapes and patterns
    Paul W K Rothemund
    Departments of Computer Science and Computation and Neural Systems, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125, USA
    Nature 440:297-302. 2006
  3. ncbi request reprint Two computational primitives for algorithmic self-assembly: copying and counting
    Robert D Barish
    Department of Computer Science, California Institute of Technology and Computation and Neural Systems, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA
    Nano Lett 5:2586-92. 2005
  4. pmc An information-bearing seed for nucleating algorithmic self-assembly
    Robert D Barish
    California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 106:6054-9. 2009
  5. doi request reprint Self-assembly of carbon nanotubes into two-dimensional geometries using DNA origami templates
    Hareem T Maune
    California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125, USA
    Nat Nanotechnol 5:61-6. 2010
  6. pmc Algorithmic self-assembly of DNA Sierpinski triangles
    Paul W K Rothemund
    Computation and Neural Systems, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, USA
    PLoS Biol 2:e424. 2004
  7. doi request reprint Programmable molecular recognition based on the geometry of DNA nanostructures
    Sungwook Woo
    Department of Bioengineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125, USA
    Nat Chem 3:620-7. 2011
  8. doi request reprint An autonomous polymerization motor powered by DNA hybridization
    Suvir Venkataraman
    Nat Nanotechnol 2:490-4. 2007
  9. ncbi request reprint Sturdier DNA nanotubes via ligation
    Patrick O'Neill
    Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, 93106, USA
    Nano Lett 6:1379-83. 2006
  10. ncbi request reprint Solution of a 20-variable 3-SAT problem on a DNA computer
    Ravinderjit S Braich
    University of Southern California, Laboratory for Molecular Science, Los Angeles, CA 90089 1340, USA
    Science 296:499-502. 2002

Collaborators

  • Erik Winfree
  • Rebecca Schulman
  • Sungwook Woo
  • Robert D Barish
  • Hareem T Maune
  • Suvir Venkataraman
  • Patrick O'Neill
  • Ravinderjit S Braich
  • Marc Bockrath
  • Si ping Han
  • William A Goddard Iii
  • Robert M Dirks
  • Niles A Pierce
  • Ashish Kumar
  • D K Fygenson
  • Nickolas Chelyapov
  • Cliff Johnson
  • Leonard Adleman

Detail Information

Publications10

  1. ncbi request reprint Design and characterization of programmable DNA nanotubes
    Paul W K Rothemund
    Department of Computer Science, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125, USA
    J Am Chem Soc 126:16344-52. 2004
    ..Supported by these results, nanotube structure is explained by a simple model based on the geometry and energetics of B-form DNA...
  2. ncbi request reprint Folding DNA to create nanoscale shapes and patterns
    Paul W K Rothemund
    Departments of Computer Science and Computation and Neural Systems, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125, USA
    Nature 440:297-302. 2006
    ..Finally, individual DNA structures can be programmed to form larger assemblies, including extended periodic lattices and a hexamer of triangles (which constitutes a 30-megadalton molecular complex)...
  3. ncbi request reprint Two computational primitives for algorithmic self-assembly: copying and counting
    Robert D Barish
    Department of Computer Science, California Institute of Technology and Computation and Neural Systems, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA
    Nano Lett 5:2586-92. 2005
    ..A subset of the tiles for counting form information-bearing DNA tubes that copy bit strings from layer to layer along their length...
  4. pmc An information-bearing seed for nucleating algorithmic self-assembly
    Robert D Barish
    California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 106:6054-9. 2009
    ..In sum, this work demonstrates how DNA origami seeds enable the easy, high-yield, low-error-rate growth of algorithmic crystals as a route toward programmable bottom-up fabrication...
  5. doi request reprint Self-assembly of carbon nanotubes into two-dimensional geometries using DNA origami templates
    Hareem T Maune
    California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125, USA
    Nat Nanotechnol 5:61-6. 2010
    ..In such organizations of electronic components, DNA origami serves as a programmable nanobreadboard; thus, DNA origami may allow the rapid prototyping of complex nanotube-based structures...
  6. pmc Algorithmic self-assembly of DNA Sierpinski triangles
    Paul W K Rothemund
    Computation and Neural Systems, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, USA
    PLoS Biol 2:e424. 2004
    ..This shows that engineered DNA self-assembly can be treated as a Turing-universal biomolecular system, capable of implementing any desired algorithm for computation or construction tasks...
  7. doi request reprint Programmable molecular recognition based on the geometry of DNA nanostructures
    Sungwook Woo
    Department of Bioengineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125, USA
    Nat Chem 3:620-7. 2011
    ..This work, which demonstrates how a single attractive interaction can be developed to create diverse bonds, may guide strategies for molecular recognition in systems beyond DNA nanostructures...
  8. doi request reprint An autonomous polymerization motor powered by DNA hybridization
    Suvir Venkataraman
    Nat Nanotechnol 2:490-4. 2007
    ..DNA strands are propelled processively at the living end of the growing polymers, demonstrating autonomous locomotion powered by the free energy of DNA hybridization...
  9. ncbi request reprint Sturdier DNA nanotubes via ligation
    Patrick O'Neill
    Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, 93106, USA
    Nano Lett 6:1379-83. 2006
    ..Ligated DNA nanotubes are thus physically and chemically sturdy enough to withstand the manipulations necessary for many technological applications...
  10. ncbi request reprint Solution of a 20-variable 3-SAT problem on a DNA computer
    Ravinderjit S Braich
    University of Southern California, Laboratory for Molecular Science, Los Angeles, CA 90089 1340, USA
    Science 296:499-502. 2002
    ..This computational problem may be the largest yet solved by nonelectronic means. Problems of this size appear to be beyond the normal range of unaided human computation...