N G Jablonski

Summary

Affiliation: California Academy of Sciences
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint A possible link between neural tube defects and ultraviolet light exposure
    N G Jablonski
    Department of Anthropology, California Academy of Sciences, San Francisco 94118 4599, USA
    Med Hypotheses 52:581-2. 1999
  2. ncbi request reprint The evolution of human skin coloration
    N G Jablonski
    Department of Anthropology, California Academy of Sciences, Golden Gate Park, San Francisco, CA 94118 4599, USA
    J Hum Evol 39:57-106. 2000
  3. ncbi request reprint The influence of life history and diet on the distribution of catarrhine primates during the Pleistocene in eastern Asia
    N G Jablonski
    Department of Anthropology, California Academy of Sciences, San Francisco 94118 4599, USA
    J Hum Evol 39:131-57. 2000
  4. ncbi request reprint A new skeleton of Theropithecus brumpti (Primates: Cercopithecidae) from Lomekwi, West Turkana, Kenya
    Nina G Jablonski
    California Academy of Sciences, Golden Gate Park, San Francisco 94118 4599, USA
    J Hum Evol 43:887-923. 2002
  5. doi request reprint The evolution of human skin colouration and its relevance to health in the modern world
    N G Jablonski
    Department of Anthropology, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA
    J R Coll Physicians Edinb 42:58-63. 2012
  6. ncbi request reprint Skin deep
    Nina G Jablonski
    California Academy of Sciences, San Francisco, USA
    Sci Am 287:74-81. 2002
  7. ncbi request reprint First fossil chimpanzee
    Sally McBrearty
    Department of Anthropology, University of Connecticut, Box U 2176, Storrs, Connecticut 06269, USA
    Nature 437:105-8. 2005

Collaborators

  • Sally McBrearty

Detail Information

Publications7

  1. ncbi request reprint A possible link between neural tube defects and ultraviolet light exposure
    N G Jablonski
    Department of Anthropology, California Academy of Sciences, San Francisco 94118 4599, USA
    Med Hypotheses 52:581-2. 1999
    ....
  2. ncbi request reprint The evolution of human skin coloration
    N G Jablonski
    Department of Anthropology, California Academy of Sciences, Golden Gate Park, San Francisco, CA 94118 4599, USA
    J Hum Evol 39:57-106. 2000
    ..Skin pigmentation levels have changed more than once in human evolution. Because of this, skin coloration is of no value in determining phylogenetic relationships among modern human groups...
  3. ncbi request reprint The influence of life history and diet on the distribution of catarrhine primates during the Pleistocene in eastern Asia
    N G Jablonski
    Department of Anthropology, California Academy of Sciences, San Francisco 94118 4599, USA
    J Hum Evol 39:131-57. 2000
    ..This ability made possible their colonization, by the Late Pleistocene, of highly seasonal habitats such as tundra, which were off-limits to non-culture-bearing catarrhines...
  4. ncbi request reprint A new skeleton of Theropithecus brumpti (Primates: Cercopithecidae) from Lomekwi, West Turkana, Kenya
    Nina G Jablonski
    California Academy of Sciences, Golden Gate Park, San Francisco 94118 4599, USA
    J Hum Evol 43:887-923. 2002
    ..T. brumpti, as represented by KNM-WT 39368, is seen as a large, colorfully decorated, and basically terrestrial papionin that was restricted to riverine forest habitats in the Lake Turkana Basin from the middle to latest Pliocene...
  5. doi request reprint The evolution of human skin colouration and its relevance to health in the modern world
    N G Jablonski
    Department of Anthropology, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA
    J R Coll Physicians Edinb 42:58-63. 2012
    ....
  6. ncbi request reprint Skin deep
    Nina G Jablonski
    California Academy of Sciences, San Francisco, USA
    Sci Am 287:74-81. 2002
  7. ncbi request reprint First fossil chimpanzee
    Sally McBrearty
    Department of Anthropology, University of Connecticut, Box U 2176, Storrs, Connecticut 06269, USA
    Nature 437:105-8. 2005
    ..Habitats suitable for both hominins and chimpanzees were clearly present there during this period, and the Rift Valley did not present an impenetrable barrier to chimpanzee occupation...