Mark E Davis

Summary

Affiliation: California Institute of Technology
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Insights into the kinetics of siRNA-mediated gene silencing from live-cell and live-animal bioluminescent imaging
    Derek W Bartlett
    Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA
    Nucleic Acids Res 34:322-33. 2006
  2. pmc Polycation-siRNA nanoparticles can disassemble at the kidney glomerular basement membrane
    Jonathan E Zuckerman
    Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 109:3137-42. 2012
  3. doi request reprint Nanoparticle therapeutics: an emerging treatment modality for cancer
    Mark E Davis
    Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125, USA
    Nat Rev Drug Discov 7:771-82. 2008
  4. doi request reprint The first targeted delivery of siRNA in humans via a self-assembling, cyclodextrin polymer-based nanoparticle: from concept to clinic
    Mark E Davis
    California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125, USA
    Mol Pharm 6:659-68. 2009
  5. pmc Evidence of RNAi in humans from systemically administered siRNA via targeted nanoparticles
    Mark E Davis
    Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125, USA
    Nature 464:1067-70. 2010
  6. ncbi request reprint Design and development of IT-101, a cyclodextrin-containing polymer conjugate of camptothecin
    Mark E Davis
    Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA
    Adv Drug Deliv Rev 61:1189-92. 2009
  7. ncbi request reprint Cyclodextrin-based pharmaceutics: past, present and future
    Mark E Davis
    Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125, USA
    Nat Rev Drug Discov 3:1023-35. 2004
  8. ncbi request reprint Ordered porous materials for emerging applications
    Mark E Davis
    Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125, USA
    Nature 417:813-21. 2002
  9. ncbi request reprint Non-viral gene delivery systems
    Mark E Davis
    Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA
    Curr Opin Biotechnol 13:128-31. 2002
  10. ncbi request reprint Self-assembling nucleic acid delivery vehicles via linear, water-soluble, cyclodextrin-containing polymers
    M E Davis
    Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA
    Curr Med Chem 11:179-97. 2004

Collaborators

  • Jeremy D Heidel
  • Thomas Schluep
  • Paul Webster
  • Antoni Ribas
  • Rajeev S Assary
  • Yongchao Liang
  • John J Rossi
  • James R Heath
  • Helen Su
  • Wolfgang A Weber
  • Georgia Z Chen
  • S Mishra
  • Heidrun Engler
  • Suzie Pun
  • YUN C YEN
  • Scott Fraser
  • M E Brewster
  • Derek W Bartlett
  • Jonathan E Zuckerman
  • Han Han
  • Chung Hang J Choi
  • Jianjun Cheng
  • Stephen R Popielarski
  • Rajan P Kulkarni
  • Nathalie C Bellocq
  • Eric L Margelefsky
  • Ryan K Zeidan
  • Manuel Moliner
  • Gregory S Jensen
  • Theresa M Reineke
  • Devin T Wiley
  • Ricardo Bermejo-Deval
  • Yuriy Román-Leshkov
  • Brendan C Mack
  • Farooq Ahmed
  • Zijian Li
  • Aijie Liu
  • Kay T Khin
  • Paul C Francel
  • Bartosz Chmielowski
  • Dean Lim
  • Robert Morgan
  • Anthony Tolcher
  • Ismael Gritli
  • Aaron Gale
  • Dorothy Silverman
  • Eranda Nikolla
  • Larry A Curtiss
  • Arna Palsdottir
  • Son Jong Hwang
  • S J Hwang
  • Raul F Lobo
  • Christopher A Alabi
  • Kenneth W Wright
  • Isabel J Hildebrandt
  • Véronique Dufaud
  • Jeremy I Martin
  • Shuang Li
  • E Todd Ryan
  • Wolfgang Maichen
  • Mark C Johnson
  • Yushan Yan
  • Ryan Zeidan
  • Junlan Wang
  • Minwei Sun
  • Robert Fazio
  • Christopher M Lew
  • Robert Andresini
  • David J Earl
  • Stacey A Kalovidouris
  • Michael W Deem
  • David D Wu
  • Siwen Hu-Lieskovan
  • Samuel W French
  • Timothy J Triche
  • Monica L Zepeda
  • Xuehui Wang
  • David W Kang
  • F Alan Stevens
  • Marc Lenaerts
  • Soon C Kim
  • James Gossett
  • Kevin S Smith
  • Paul Tompkins
  • Cynthia Gossett
  • N C Bellocq

Detail Information

Publications56

  1. pmc Insights into the kinetics of siRNA-mediated gene silencing from live-cell and live-animal bioluminescent imaging
    Derek W Bartlett
    Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA
    Nucleic Acids Res 34:322-33. 2006
    ....
  2. pmc Polycation-siRNA nanoparticles can disassemble at the kidney glomerular basement membrane
    Jonathan E Zuckerman
    Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 109:3137-42. 2012
    ..This clearance mechanism may affect any nanoparticles that assemble primarily by electrostatic interactions between cationic delivery components and anionic nucleic acids (or other therapeutic entities)...
  3. doi request reprint Nanoparticle therapeutics: an emerging treatment modality for cancer
    Mark E Davis
    Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125, USA
    Nat Rev Drug Discov 7:771-82. 2008
    ....
  4. doi request reprint The first targeted delivery of siRNA in humans via a self-assembling, cyclodextrin polymer-based nanoparticle: from concept to clinic
    Mark E Davis
    California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125, USA
    Mol Pharm 6:659-68. 2009
    ..The four component formulation is self-assembled into nanoparticles in the pharmacy and administered intravenously (iv) to patients. The designed features of this experimental therapeutic are described, and their functions illustrated...
  5. pmc Evidence of RNAi in humans from systemically administered siRNA via targeted nanoparticles
    Mark E Davis
    Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125, USA
    Nature 464:1067-70. 2010
    ..Together, these data demonstrate that siRNA administered systemically to a human can produce a specific gene inhibition (reduction in mRNA and protein) by an RNAi mechanism of action...
  6. ncbi request reprint Design and development of IT-101, a cyclodextrin-containing polymer conjugate of camptothecin
    Mark E Davis
    Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA
    Adv Drug Deliv Rev 61:1189-92. 2009
    ..IT-101 is currently being investigated in human clinical trials. Here, the design and development of IT-101 is described with emphasis on features distinguishing it from other polymer-containing therapeutics...
  7. ncbi request reprint Cyclodextrin-based pharmaceutics: past, present and future
    Mark E Davis
    Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125, USA
    Nat Rev Drug Discov 3:1023-35. 2004
    ..Cyclodextrin-containing polymers are reviewed and their use in drug delivery presented. Of specific interest is the use of cyclodextrin-containing polymers to provide unique capabilities for the delivery of nucleic acids...
  8. ncbi request reprint Ordered porous materials for emerging applications
    Mark E Davis
    Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125, USA
    Nature 417:813-21. 2002
    ..In fact, porous materials now seem set to contribute to developments in areas ranging from microelectronics to medical diagnosis...
  9. ncbi request reprint Non-viral gene delivery systems
    Mark E Davis
    Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA
    Curr Opin Biotechnol 13:128-31. 2002
    ..In vivo, problems of extracellular non-specific interactions and intracellular trafficking to the nucleus are also encountered. Recent progress has been made in overcoming these issues...
  10. ncbi request reprint Self-assembling nucleic acid delivery vehicles via linear, water-soluble, cyclodextrin-containing polymers
    M E Davis
    Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA
    Curr Med Chem 11:179-97. 2004
    ..This vehicle is the first example of a polymer-based gene delivery system formed entirely by self-assembly...
  11. ncbi request reprint Structural effects of carbohydrate-containing polycations on gene delivery. 2. Charge center type
    Theresa M Reineke
    Division of Chemistry, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125, USA
    Bioconjug Chem 14:255-61. 2003
    ..Additionally, transfection experiments conducted in the presence of chloroquine reveal increased gene expression from quaternary ammonium containing polycations and not from their amidine analogues...
  12. ncbi request reprint Structure-function correlation of chloroquine and analogues as transgene expression enhancers in nonviral gene delivery
    Jianjun Cheng
    Insert Therapeutics, 2585 Nina Street, Pasadena, CA 91107, USA
    J Med Chem 49:6522-31. 2006
    ....
  13. pmc Physicochemical and biological characterization of targeted, nucleic acid-containing nanoparticles
    Derek W Bartlett
    Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125, USA
    Bioconjug Chem 18:456-68. 2007
    ..The analysis of the CDP delivery vehicle provides insights that can be applied to the design of targeted nucleic acid delivery vehicles in general...
  14. ncbi request reprint Transferrin-containing, cyclodextrin polymer-based particles for tumor-targeted gene delivery
    Nathalie C Bellocq
    Insert Therapeutics, Inc, Pasadena, California, USA
    Bioconjug Chem 14:1122-32. 2003
    ..The transferrin-modified nanoparticles are appropriate for use in the systemic delivery of nucleic acid therapeutics for metastatic cancer applications...
  15. pmc Pharmacokinetics and tumor dynamics of the nanoparticle IT-101 from PET imaging and tumor histological measurements
    Thomas Schluep
    Calando Pharmaceuticals, Inc, 129 North Hill Avenue, Pasadena, CA 91106, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 106:11394-9. 2009
    ..Histological measurements using confocal microscopy show that IT-101 localizes within tumor cells and provides the sink in the tumor for the nanoparticles...
  16. ncbi request reprint Targeted delivery of RNA-cleaving DNA enzyme (DNAzyme) to tumor tissue by transferrin-modified, cyclodextrin-based particles
    Suzie H Pun
    Insert Therapeutics, Inc, Pasadena, California, USA
    Cancer Biol Ther 3:641-50. 2004
    ..Tumor cell uptake is observed with intravenous bolus injection only, and intracellular delivery requires transferrin targeting...
  17. ncbi request reprint Cyclodextrin-modified polyethylenimine polymers for gene delivery
    Suzie H Pun
    Insert Therapeutics Inc, 2585 Nina Street, Pasadena, California 91107, USA
    Bioconjug Chem 15:831-40. 2004
    ..Tail vein injections into mice of 120 microg of plasmid DNA formulated with CD-lPEI and AD-PEG do not reveal observable toxicities, and both nucleic acid accumulation and expression are observed in liver...
  18. pmc Targeted nanoparticles assembled via complexation of boronic-acid-containing targeting moieties to diol-containing polymers
    Han Han
    Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA
    Bioconjug Chem 24:669-77. 2013
    ..60 CPT molecules per nanoparticle and shows prolonged plasma circulation with an elimination half-life of 21.2 h and AUC value of 2766 μg.h/mL at a 10 mg CPT/kg tail vein injection in mice...
  19. ncbi request reprint Preclinical efficacy of the camptothecin-polymer conjugate IT-101 in multiple cancer models
    Thomas Schluep
    Insert Therapeutics, Inc, Pasadena, CA 91107, USA
    Clin Cancer Res 12:1606-14. 2006
    ..Taken together, these results indicate that IT-101 has good tolerability and antitumor activity against a wide range of tumors...
  20. ncbi request reprint Single cell kinetics of intracellular, nonviral, nucleic acid delivery vehicle acidification and trafficking
    Rajan P Kulkarni
    Option in Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125, USA
    Bioconjug Chem 16:986-94. 2005
    ..Here, the live cell, spatiotemporal mapping of these behaviors is demonstrated and, when combined with cell uptake and luciferase expression data, shows that there is not a correlation between buffering capacity and gene expression...
  21. ncbi request reprint Pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of the camptothecin-polymer conjugate IT-101 in rats and tumor-bearing mice
    Thomas Schluep
    Insert Therapeutics, Inc, 3525 Nina Street, Pasadena, CA, 91107, USA
    Cancer Chemother Pharmacol 57:654-62. 2006
    ..The pharmacokinetics of IT-101 in plasma of rats and its biodistribution in nude mice bearing human LS174T colon carcinoma tumors is reported here...
  22. ncbi request reprint Potent siRNA inhibitors of ribonucleotide reductase subunit RRM2 reduce cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo
    Jeremy D Heidel
    Calando Pharmaceuticals, Inc, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91107, USA
    Clin Cancer Res 13:2207-15. 2007
    ..Here, a potent small interfering RNA (siRNA) duplex against the M2 subunit of RR (RRM2) is developed and shown to reduce the growth potential of cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo...
  23. ncbi request reprint Imidazole groups on a linear, cyclodextrin-containing polycation produce enhanced gene delivery via multiple processes
    Swaroop Mishra
    Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA
    J Control Release 116:179-91. 2006
    ..Together, these data suggest that differences in transfection efficiency between CDP and CDPim result from factors beyond buffering activity and endosomal escape...
  24. ncbi request reprint Effect of siRNA nuclease stability on the in vitro and in vivo kinetics of siRNA-mediated gene silencing
    Derek W Bartlett
    Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125, USA
    Biotechnol Bioeng 97:909-21. 2007
    ....
  25. ncbi request reprint A nanoparticle-based model delivery system to guide the rational design of gene delivery to the liver. 1. Synthesis and characterization
    Stephen R Popielarski
    Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125, USA
    Bioconjug Chem 16:1063-70. 2005
    ..All four particles have the same surface charge, and Gal-50 and Gal-140 have the same surface galactose density. The availability of galactose ligands to receptor binding is demonstrated here by agglutination with RCA120...
  26. ncbi request reprint Antitumor activity of beta-cyclodextrin polymer-camptothecin conjugates
    Jianjun Cheng
    Insert Therapeutics, Inc, 2585 Nina Street, Pasadena, California 91107, USA
    Mol Pharm 1:183-93. 2004
    ....
  27. pmc Administration in non-human primates of escalating intravenous doses of targeted nanoparticles containing ribonucleotide reductase subunit M2 siRNA
    Jeremy D Heidel
    Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, MC 210 41, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:5715-21. 2007
    ..Taken together, the data presented show that multiple, systemic doses of targeted nanoparticles containing nonchemically modified siRNA can safely be administered to non-human primates...
  28. ncbi request reprint Structural effects of carbohydrate-containing polycations on gene delivery. 1. Carbohydrate size and its distance from charge centers
    Theresa M Reineke
    Division of Chemistry, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125, USA
    Bioconjug Chem 14:247-54. 2003
    ..The absence of a carbohydrate in the polycation produces high toxicity. All carbohydrate polycations transfect BHK-21 cells to approximately the same level of gene expression...
  29. ncbi request reprint PEGylation significantly affects cellular uptake and intracellular trafficking of non-viral gene delivery particles
    Swaroop Mishra
    Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA
    Eur J Cell Biol 83:97-111. 2004
    ....
  30. ncbi request reprint Synthetic biocompatible cyclodextrin-based constructs for local gene delivery to improve cutaneous wound healing
    Nathalie C Bellocq
    Insert Therapeutics, Inc, 2585 Nina Street, Pasadena, California 91107, USA
    Bioconjug Chem 15:1201-11. 2004
    ..These in vitro results suggest that the synthetic constructs are suitable for in vivo tissue repair applications...
  31. pmc Mechanism of active targeting in solid tumors with transferrin-containing gold nanoparticles
    Chung Hang J Choi
    Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107:1235-40. 2010
    ..These results suggest that targeted nanoparticles can provide greater intracellular delivery of therapeutic agents to the cancer cells within solid tumors than their nontargeted analogs...
  32. ncbi request reprint Impact of tumor-specific targeting and dosing schedule on tumor growth inhibition after intravenous administration of siRNA-containing nanoparticles
    Derek W Bartlett
    Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E California Blvd, MC 210 41, Pasadena, California 91125, USA
    Biotechnol Bioeng 99:975-85. 2008
    ....
  33. ncbi request reprint A nanoparticle-based model delivery system to guide the rational design of gene delivery to the liver. 2. In vitro and in vivo uptake results
    Stephen R Popielarski
    Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125, USA
    Bioconjug Chem 16:1071-80. 2005
    ....
  34. doi request reprint Clinical developments in nanotechnology for cancer therapy
    Jeremy D Heidel
    Calando Pharmaceuticals, Pasadena, California, USA
    Pharm Res 28:187-99. 2011
    ..Additionally, we discuss recent advances in the understanding of ligand-based targeting of nanoparticles, such as on receptor avidity and selectivity...
  35. pmc Impact of tumor-specific targeting on the biodistribution and efficacy of siRNA nanoparticles measured by multimodality in vivo imaging
    Derek W Bartlett
    Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, MC 210 41, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:15549-54. 2007
    ..Optimization of internalization may therefore be key for the development of effective nanoparticle-based targeted therapeutics...
  36. doi request reprint A biodegradable filament for controlled drug delivery
    Brendan C Mack
    Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, United States
    J Control Release 139:205-11. 2009
    ..The filaments are generally well tolerated by the rabbits. Filament failure occurs at 6-8 days within the rabbit eyes, essentially the same time to failure observed from in-vitro mechanical properties testing results...
  37. doi request reprint Cooperative catalysis by silica-supported organic functional groups
    Eric L Margelefsky
    Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125, USA
    Chem Soc Rev 37:1118-26. 2008
    ..Particular attention is given to the effect of the spatial arrangement of these organic groups and recent developments in the spatial organization of multiple groups on the silica surface...
  38. ncbi request reprint Molecular conjugates
    Jeremy Heidel
    Chemical Engineering, 210 41, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena 91125, USA
    Adv Biochem Eng Biotechnol 99:7-39. 2005
    ..We discuss some of the difficulties involved in the assembly of a functioning delivery system for in vivo use...
  39. pmc Targeting kidney mesangium by nanoparticles of defined size
    Chung Hang J Choi
    Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108:6656-61. 2011
    ..Because many diseases originate from this area of the kidney, our findings establish design criteria for constructing nanoparticle-based therapeutics for targeting diseases that involve the mesangium of the kidney...
  40. pmc Correlating animal and human phase Ia/Ib clinical data with CALAA-01, a targeted, polymer-based nanoparticle containing siRNA
    Jonathan E Zuckerman
    Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 111:11449-54. 2014
    ..Taken in total, the animal models do appear to predict the behavior of CALAA-01 in humans. ..
  41. pmc Tin-containing zeolites are highly active catalysts for the isomerization of glucose in water
    Manuel Moliner
    Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107:6164-8. 2010
    ....
  42. ncbi request reprint Development of a nonviral gene delivery vehicle for systemic application
    Suzie Hwang Pun
    Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125, USA
    Bioconjug Chem 13:630-9. 2002
    ..Thus, surface modification of betaCDP-based polyplexes through the use of cyclodextrin/adamantane host/guest interactions endows the particles with properties appropriate for systemic application...
  43. ncbi request reprint Structural effects of carbohydrate-containing polycations on gene delivery. 3. Cyclodextrin type and functionalization
    Stephen R Popielarski
    Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125, USA
    Bioconjug Chem 14:672-8. 2003
    ..Further, gamma-CD-based polycations are shown to be less toxic than otherwise identical beta-CD-based polycations...
  44. ncbi request reprint A solvent-free method for isotopically or radioactively labeling cyclodextrins and cyclodextrin-containing polymers
    Ryan K Zeidan
    Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena California 91125, USA
    Bioconjug Chem 17:1624-6. 2006
    ..The method can be generalized for use with materials that contain nucleophiles other than alcohols, e.g., amines...
  45. pmc Transcytosis and brain uptake of transferrin-containing nanoparticles by tuning avidity to transferrin receptor
    Devin T Wiley
    Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 110:8662-7. 2013
    ..The requirement of proper avidity for nanoparticles to reach the brain parenchyma is consistent with recent behavior observed with transcytosing antibodies that bind to TfR...
  46. pmc Nanotechnology and cancer
    James R Heath
    Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125, USA
    Annu Rev Med 59:251-65. 2008
    ..The goal of the presentation is to identify nanotherapeutic strategies that are designed to increase efficacy while simultaneously minimizing the toxic side effects commonly associated with cancer chemotherapies...
  47. ncbi request reprint Synthesis of linear, beta-cyclodextrin-based polymers and their camptothecin conjugates
    Jianjun Cheng
    Insert Therapeutics, Inc, 2585 Nina Street, Pasadena, California 91107, USA
    Bioconjug Chem 14:1007-17. 2003
    ..The parent polymer 2e has very low toxicity to all cultured cells tested...
  48. pmc Quantitating intracellular transport of polyplexes by spatio-temporal image correlation spectroscopy
    Rajan P Kulkarni
    Option in Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102:7523-8. 2005
    ..These studies suggest that spatio-temporal ICS is a powerful technique for assessing the nature of intracellular motion and provides a quantitative tool to compare the transport of different objects within a living cell...
  49. ncbi request reprint Targeting therapeutics to the glomerulus with nanoparticles
    Jonathan E Zuckerman
    Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA
    Adv Chronic Kidney Dis 20:500-7. 2013
    ..Finally, we discuss the behavior of nanoparticles in animal models of diseased glomeruli and review examples of nanoparticle therapeutic approaches that have shown promise in animal models of glomerulonephritic disease. ..
  50. ncbi request reprint Organized surface functional groups: cooperative catalysis via thiol/sulfonic acid pairing
    Eric L Margelefsky
    Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA
    J Am Chem Soc 129:13691-7. 2007
    ..This work clearly reveals the importance of nanoscale organization of two disparate functional groups on the surface of heterogeneous catalysts...
  51. pmc Single-antibody, targeted nanoparticle delivery of camptothecin
    Han Han
    Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125, United States
    Mol Pharm 10:2558-67. 2013
    ..These results demonstrate that the antitumor efficacy of nanoparticles carrying anticancer drugs can be enhanced by incorporating on average a single antibody. ..
  52. pmc Metalloenzyme-like catalyzed isomerizations of sugars by Lewis acid zeolites
    Ricardo Bermejo-Deval
    Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 109:9727-32. 2012
    ..The zeolite catalysts provide processing advantages over metalloenzymes such as an ability to work at higher temperatures and in acidic conditions that allow for the isomerization reaction to be coupled with other important conversions...
  53. ncbi request reprint Effects of structure of beta-cyclodextrin-containing polymers on gene delivery
    S J Hwang
    Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125, USA
    Bioconjug Chem 12:280-90. 2001
    ..In vitro toxicity varied by 1 order of magnitude and the lowest toxicity is observed with betaCDP8. The LD40 of the betaCDP6 to mice is 200 mg/kg, making this polymer a promising agent for in vivo gene delivery applications...
  54. ncbi request reprint Regeneration of rat sciatic nerve across a LactoSorb bioresorbable conduit with interposed short-segment nerve grafts
    Paul C Francel
    Department of Neurosurgery, University of Oklahoma, Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73104, USA
    J Neurosurg 99:549-54. 2003
    ..This study was conducted to evaluate peripheral nerve regeneration through a conduit composed of a bioresorbable material (LactoSorb)...
  55. ncbi request reprint Mechanical and dielectric properties of pure-silica-zeolite low-k materials
    Zijian Li
    Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521, USA
    Angew Chem Int Ed Engl 45:6329-32. 2006
  56. pmc Profile of Mark E. Davis
    Farooq Ahmed
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:20651-3. 2007

Research Grants4

  1. Design of Gene Delivery System to Target Hepatocytes
    Mark Davis; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..The long-term objective of our proposal is to design and engineer a generalized, synthetic system for ultimately delivering nucleic acid-based therapeutics to hepatocytes in humans. ..
  2. Design of Gene Delivery System to Target Hepatocytes
    Mark Davis; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..The long-term objective of our proposal is to design and engineer a generalized, synthetic system for ultimately delivering nucleic acid-based therapeutics to hepatocytes in humans. ..
  3. A Novel Method of Nanoparticle Delivery to Brain by Targeting Ec-gp96
    Mark E Davis; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ....