Eric J Brown

Summary

Affiliation: California Institute of Technology
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Dysfunctional telomeres activate an ATM-ATR-dependent DNA damage response to suppress tumorigenesis
    Xiaolan Guo
    Department of Cancer Genetics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA
    EMBO J 26:4709-19. 2007
  2. pmc Deletion of the developmentally essential gene ATR in adult mice leads to age-related phenotypes and stem cell loss
    Yaroslava Ruzankina
    Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute, Department of Cancer Biology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 421 Curie Boulevard, Philadelphia, PA 19104 6160, USA
    Cell Stem Cell 1:113-26. 2007
  3. pmc Essential and dispensable roles of ATR in cell cycle arrest and genome maintenance
    Eric J Brown
    California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125, USA
    Genes Dev 17:615-28. 2003
  4. ncbi The ATR-independent DNA replication checkpoint
    Eric J Brown
    California Institute of Technology, Mail Code 147 75, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA
    Cell Cycle 2:188-9. 2003
  5. ncbi Germline transmission and tissue-specific expression of transgenes delivered by lentiviral vectors
    Carlos Lois
    Division of Biology, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA
    Science 295:868-72. 2002
  6. pmc The tumor suppressor menin regulates hematopoiesis and myeloid transformation by influencing Hox gene expression
    Ya Xiong Chen
    Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute, Department of Cancer Biology, Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 6160, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103:1018-23. 2006
  7. ncbi Protein kinase C delta stimulates apoptosis by initiating G1 phase cell cycle progression and S phase arrest
    Ademi E Santiago-Walker
    Department of Pharmacology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, 19104 6061, USA
    J Biol Chem 280:32107-14. 2005
  8. pmc The DNA damage pathway regulates innate immune system ligands of the NKG2D receptor
    Stephan Gasser
    Department of Molecular and Cell Biology and Cancer Research Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 3200, USA
    Nature 436:1186-90. 2005
  9. pmc Replicative stress, stem cells and aging
    Yaroslava Ruzankina
    Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute, Department of Cancer Biology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 421 Curie Boulevard, Philadelphia, PA 19104 6160, USA
    Mech Ageing Dev 129:460-6. 2008
  10. ncbi Analysis of cell cycle progression and genomic integrity in early lethal knockouts
    Eric J Brown
    Department of Cancer Biology, Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, USA
    Methods Mol Biol 280:201-12. 2004

Collaborators

  • David Baltimore
  • Carlos Lois
  • Jay L Hess
  • Sandra Orsulic
  • G D Kao
  • SANDY S CHANG
  • Philip King
  • Stephan Gasser
  • Yaroslava Ruzankina
  • Elsa Noah N'Diaye
  • Ingrid Chou Koo
  • Ping Wu
  • Amma Asare
  • Philip E Lapinski
  • Xiaolan Guo
  • Michaela Gruber
  • J Hiroshi Morisaki
  • Ya Xiong Chen
  • Ademi E Santiago-Walker
  • Luisa M Stamm
  • Yann Gaël Gangloff
  • Isabelle Mouro-Chanteloup
  • Patricia Lagadec
  • Mette Johansen
  • Manojkumar A Puthenveedu
  • Jeffery S Cox
  • Mark von Zastrow
  • Kimberly K Kajihara
  • Yamini M Ohol
  • Aylin C Hanyaloglu
  • Guohua Yuan
  • Randall S Johnson
  • Carolina Pinzon-Guzman
  • Yibin Deng
  • Timothy J Bauler
  • Laura Pontano
  • Valerie P Zediak
  • Suzanne Chan
  • Elizabeth D Hughes
  • Brian Keith
  • Wilfredo Cosme-Blanco
  • Cheng Jun Hu
  • Thomas L Saunders
  • Yahong Lin
  • Marielena Velez
  • M Celeste Simon
  • George Cotsarelis
  • Hua He
  • Tony Ong
  • Avinash Bhandoola
  • Jizhou Yan
  • Karen Keeshan
  • Warren S Pear
  • Albert Silva
  • Haoren Wang
  • Anthony T Tubbs
  • Xianxin Hua
  • Aphrothiti J Fikaris
  • Klemens Rottner
  • Scott B Snapper
  • Marcelo G Kazanietz
  • Judy L Meinkoth
  • Silvia Lommel
  • Melissa A Pak
  • Sung Hee Um
  • Melanie Sticker
  • Stephen G Dann
  • Sara C Kozma
  • Petr Svoboda
  • Jean Francois Spetz
  • Silvia Cereghini
  • Matthias Mueller
  • George Thomas
  • Michel Ticchioni
  • Virginie Nicolas
  • Pierre Gane
  • Jean Delaunay
  • Olivier Dejoux
  • Caroline Le Van Kim
  • Alain Bernard
  • Luanne L Peters
  • Yves Colin
  • Françoise Cottrez
  • Jean Pierre Cartron

Detail Information

Publications19

  1. pmc Dysfunctional telomeres activate an ATM-ATR-dependent DNA damage response to suppress tumorigenesis
    Xiaolan Guo
    Department of Cancer Genetics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA
    EMBO J 26:4709-19. 2007
    ..In addition, our results suggest that loss of ATM can cooperate with dysfunctional telomeres to promote cellular transformation and tumor formation in vivo...
  2. pmc Deletion of the developmentally essential gene ATR in adult mice leads to age-related phenotypes and stem cell loss
    Yaroslava Ruzankina
    Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute, Department of Cancer Biology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 421 Curie Boulevard, Philadelphia, PA 19104 6160, USA
    Cell Stem Cell 1:113-26. 2007
    ..In aggregate, these studies suggest that reduced regenerative capacity in adults via deletion of a developmentally essential DDR gene is sufficient to cause the premature appearance of age-related phenotypes...
  3. pmc Essential and dispensable roles of ATR in cell cycle arrest and genome maintenance
    Eric J Brown
    California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125, USA
    Genes Dev 17:615-28. 2003
    ..When DNA replication inhibitors are removed, ATR knockout cells proceed to mitosis but do so with chromosome breaks, indicating that ATR provides a key genome maintenance function in S phase...
  4. ncbi The ATR-independent DNA replication checkpoint
    Eric J Brown
    California Institute of Technology, Mail Code 147 75, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA
    Cell Cycle 2:188-9. 2003
  5. ncbi Germline transmission and tissue-specific expression of transgenes delivered by lentiviral vectors
    Carlos Lois
    Division of Biology, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA
    Science 295:868-72. 2002
    ..We have also generated transgenic rats that express GFP at high levels, suggesting that this technique can be used to produce other transgenic animal species...
  6. pmc The tumor suppressor menin regulates hematopoiesis and myeloid transformation by influencing Hox gene expression
    Ya Xiong Chen
    Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute, Department of Cancer Biology, Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 6160, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103:1018-23. 2006
    ..These studies uncover an important role for menin in both normal hematopoiesis and myeloid transformation and provide a mechanistic understanding of menin's function in these processes that may be used for therapy...
  7. ncbi Protein kinase C delta stimulates apoptosis by initiating G1 phase cell cycle progression and S phase arrest
    Ademi E Santiago-Walker
    Department of Pharmacology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, 19104 6061, USA
    J Biol Chem 280:32107-14. 2005
    ..Importantly, they reveal the existence of a novel, cell cycle-dependent mechanism through which PKCdelta stimulates cell death...
  8. pmc The DNA damage pathway regulates innate immune system ligands of the NKG2D receptor
    Stephan Gasser
    Department of Molecular and Cell Biology and Cancer Research Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 3200, USA
    Nature 436:1186-90. 2005
    ..Thus, the DNA damage response, previously shown to arrest the cell cycle and enhance DNA repair functions, or to trigger apoptosis, may also participate in alerting the immune system to the presence of potentially dangerous cells...
  9. pmc Replicative stress, stem cells and aging
    Yaroslava Ruzankina
    Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute, Department of Cancer Biology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 421 Curie Boulevard, Philadelphia, PA 19104 6160, USA
    Mech Ageing Dev 129:460-6. 2008
    ....
  10. ncbi Analysis of cell cycle progression and genomic integrity in early lethal knockouts
    Eric J Brown
    Department of Cancer Biology, Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, USA
    Methods Mol Biol 280:201-12. 2004
    ..It is interesting to note that recently developed methods to introduce single-copy transgenes into one-cell zygotes via lentiviruses may provide a means to generate Cre/lox-conditional cell lines from these conventional knockouts...
  11. ncbi Evidence that the red cell skeleton protein 4.2 interacts with the Rh membrane complex member CD47
    Isabelle Mouro-Chanteloup
    Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale INSERM U76, Institut National de la Transfusion Sanguine, Paris, France
    Blood 101:338-44. 2003
    ..2(-) and Rh(null) red cells...
  12. pmc The ubiquitin-like protein PLIC-2 is a negative regulator of G protein-coupled receptor endocytosis
    Elsa Noah N'Diaye
    Macrophage Biology Laboratory, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Francisco, CA 94121, USA
    Mol Biol Cell 19:1252-60. 2008
    ..Identification of a negative regulator of GPCR clustering reveals a new function of ubiquitin-like proteins and highlights a cellular requirement for exquisite regulation of receptor dynamics...
  13. pmc Role for lysosomal enzyme beta-hexosaminidase in the control of mycobacteria infection
    Ingrid Chou Koo
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Program in Microbial Pathogenesis and Host Defense, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105:710-5. 2008
    ..Thus, secretion of lysosomal enzymes is a mycobactericidal mechanism that may have a more general role in host defense...
  14. ncbi Generation of mice with a conditional allele of the p120 Ras GTPase-activating protein
    Philip E Lapinski
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA
    Genesis 45:762-7. 2007
    ..The conditional rasa1 mouse will be useful for the analysis of the role of RasGAP in mature cell types...
  15. ncbi Involvement of a CD47-dependent pathway in platelet adhesion on inflamed vascular endothelium under flow
    Patricia Lagadec
    Unité Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale INSERM U343 et Laboratoire d Immunologie, Nice, France
    Blood 101:4836-43. 2003
    ..Overall, CD47 antagonists may be potentially useful to inhibit platelet adhesion on inflamed endothelium...
  16. pmc Acute postnatal ablation of Hif-2alpha results in anemia
    Michaela Gruber
    Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:2301-6. 2007
    ....
  17. pmc The ubiquitin-related protein PLIC-1 regulates heterotrimeric G protein function through association with Gbetagamma
    Elsa Noah N'Diaye
    Program in Host Pathogen Interactions, University of California, San Francisco, Campus Box 2140, 600 16th St, San Francisco, CA 94143 2140, USA
    J Cell Biol 163:1157-65. 2003
    ..Thus, PLIC-1 inhibits Gi signaling by direct association with Gbetagamma; because it also interacts with CD47, a modulator of integrin function, it likely has a role integrating adhesion and signaling components of cell migration...
  18. pmc Role of the WASP family proteins for Mycobacterium marinum actin tail formation
    Luisa M Stamm
    Program in Microbial Pathogenesis and Host Defense, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102:14837-42. 2005
    ..Together, these data demonstrate that M. marinum subversion of host actin polymerization is most similar to distantly related Gram-negative organisms but that its mechanism for activating WASP family proteins is unique...
  19. pmc Disruption of the mouse mTOR gene leads to early postimplantation lethality and prohibits embryonic stem cell development
    Yann Gaël Gangloff
    Genome Research Institute, University of Cincinnati, 2180 E Galbraith Rd, Cincinnati, OH 45237, USA
    Mol Cell Biol 24:9508-16. 2004
    ..Moreover, mTOR(-/-) embryos display a lesion in inner cell mass proliferation, consistent with the inability to establish embryonic stem cells from mTOR(-/-) embryos...