Neal M Williams

Summary

Affiliation: Bryn Mawr College
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Resource distributions among habitats determine solitary bee offspring production in a mosaic landscape
    Neal M Williams
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544, USA
    Ecol Appl 17:910-21. 2007
  2. ncbi request reprint Native bees provide insurance against ongoing honey bee losses
    Rachael Winfree
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA
    Ecol Lett 10:1105-13. 2007
  3. pmc Crop pollination from native bees at risk from agricultural intensification
    Claire Kremen
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Guyot Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 99:16812-6. 2002
  4. ncbi request reprint Testing simple indices of habitat proximity
    Rachael Winfree
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544, USA
    Am Nat 165:707-17. 2005
  5. ncbi request reprint Pollination and other ecosystem services produced by mobile organisms: a conceptual framework for the effects of land-use change
    Claire Kremen
    Department of Environmental Sciences, Policy and Management, University of California, 137 Mulford Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 3114, USA
    Ecol Lett 10:299-314. 2007
  6. ncbi request reprint Use of novel pollen species by specialist and generalist solitary bees (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae)
    Neal M Williams
    Dept of Ecology and Evolution, State University of New York, Stony Brook, NY 11795 5245, USA
    Oecologia 134:228-37. 2003
  7. ncbi request reprint Complex responses within a desert bee guild (Hymenoptera: Apiformes) to urban habitat fragmentation
    James H Cane
    USDA ARS Bee Biology and Systematics Laboratory, Department of Biology, Utah State University, Logan, Utah 84322, USA
    Ecol Appl 16:632-44. 2006
  8. ncbi request reprint Bee foraging ranges and their relationship to body size
    Sarah S Greenleaf
    Department of Plant Pathology, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616, USA
    Oecologia 153:589-96. 2007

Detail Information

Publications8

  1. ncbi request reprint Resource distributions among habitats determine solitary bee offspring production in a mosaic landscape
    Neal M Williams
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544, USA
    Ecol Appl 17:910-21. 2007
    ....
  2. ncbi request reprint Native bees provide insurance against ongoing honey bee losses
    Rachael Winfree
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA
    Ecol Lett 10:1105-13. 2007
    ..The honey bee is currently undergoing extensive die-offs because of Colony Collapse Disorder. We predict that in our region native bees will buffer potential declines in agricultural production because of honey bee losses...
  3. pmc Crop pollination from native bees at risk from agricultural intensification
    Claire Kremen
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Guyot Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 99:16812-6. 2002
    ..Continued degradation of the agro-natural landscape will destroy this "free" service, but conservation and restoration of bee habitat are potentially viable economic alternatives for reducing dependence on managed honey bees...
  4. ncbi request reprint Testing simple indices of habitat proximity
    Rachael Winfree
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544, USA
    Am Nat 165:707-17. 2005
    ..However, none of the indices performed well in predicting population response variables. The results suggest that the pattern of habitat cover alone may be insufficient to predict the process of animal movement...
  5. ncbi request reprint Pollination and other ecosystem services produced by mobile organisms: a conceptual framework for the effects of land-use change
    Claire Kremen
    Department of Environmental Sciences, Policy and Management, University of California, 137 Mulford Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 3114, USA
    Ecol Lett 10:299-314. 2007
    ..Developing conceptual models for MABES aids in identifying knowledge gaps, determining research priorities, and targeting interventions that can be applied in an adaptive management context...
  6. ncbi request reprint Use of novel pollen species by specialist and generalist solitary bees (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae)
    Neal M Williams
    Dept of Ecology and Evolution, State University of New York, Stony Brook, NY 11795 5245, USA
    Oecologia 134:228-37. 2003
    ..The ability of the larvae to cope with specific components of one pollen species need not interfere with its ability to use others...
  7. ncbi request reprint Complex responses within a desert bee guild (Hymenoptera: Apiformes) to urban habitat fragmentation
    James H Cane
    USDA ARS Bee Biology and Systematics Laboratory, Department of Biology, Utah State University, Logan, Utah 84322, USA
    Ecol Appl 16:632-44. 2006
    ..Pollination interactions with this floral host are probably not adversely affected in this system because of its longevity and ability to attract diverse pollinators but will demand careful further study to understand...
  8. ncbi request reprint Bee foraging ranges and their relationship to body size
    Sarah S Greenleaf
    Department of Plant Pathology, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616, USA
    Oecologia 153:589-96. 2007
    ..The equations we present can be used to predict foraging distances for many bee species, based on a simple measurement of body size...