Rami Kantor

Summary

Affiliation: Brown University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Misclassification of first-line antiretroviral treatment failure based on immunological monitoring of HIV infection in resource-limited settings
    Rami Kantor
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, USA
    Clin Infect Dis 49:454-62. 2009
  2. ncbi request reprint Impact of HIV-1 pol diversity on drug resistance and its clinical implications
    Rami Kantor
    Division of Infectious Diseases, The Miriam Hospital, Providence, Rhode Island 02906, USA
    Curr Opin Infect Dis 19:594-606. 2006
  3. pmc Impact of HIV-1 subtype and antiretroviral therapy on protease and reverse transcriptase genotype: results of a global collaboration
    Rami Kantor
    Division of Infectious Disease and Center for AIDS Research, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    PLoS Med 2:e112. 2005
  4. pmc Mutation patterns and structural correlates in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease following different protease inhibitor treatments
    Thomas D Wu
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Virol 77:4836-47. 2003
  5. pmc HIV-1 pol mutation frequency by subtype and treatment experience: extension of the HIVseq program to seven non-B subtypes
    Soo Yon Rhee
    Division of Infectious Disease, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    AIDS 20:643-51. 2006
  6. ncbi request reprint Drug resistance in plasma and breast milk after single-dose nevirapine in subtype C HIV type 1: population and clonal sequence analysis
    Seble Kassaye
    Department of Medicine and Infectious Diseases, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses 23:1055-61. 2007
  7. pmc Envelope coreceptor tropism, drug resistance, and viral evolution among subtype C HIV-1-infected individuals receiving nonsuppressive antiretroviral therapy
    Seble Kassaye
    Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr 50:9-18. 2009
  8. pmc Extended spectrum of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase mutations in patients receiving multiple nucleoside analog inhibitors
    Matthew J Gonzales
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Stanford University, CA, USA
    AIDS 17:791-9. 2003
  9. pmc HIV-1 subtype C reverse transcriptase and protease genotypes in Zimbabwean patients failing antiretroviral therapy
    Rami Kantor
    Division of Infectious Diseases and AIDS Research, Stanford University, California 94305, USA
    AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses 18:1407-13. 2002
  10. ncbi request reprint Drug resistance in non-subtype B HIV-1
    Rami Kantor
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Center for AIDS Research, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, room S 156, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Clin Virol 29:152-9. 2004

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications30

  1. doi request reprint Misclassification of first-line antiretroviral treatment failure based on immunological monitoring of HIV infection in resource-limited settings
    Rami Kantor
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, USA
    Clin Infect Dis 49:454-62. 2009
    ..The early identification of first-line antiretroviral treatment failure is critical to prevent morbidity, mortality, and drug resistance. Misclassification of failure may result in premature switching to second-line therapy...
  2. ncbi request reprint Impact of HIV-1 pol diversity on drug resistance and its clinical implications
    Rami Kantor
    Division of Infectious Diseases, The Miriam Hospital, Providence, Rhode Island 02906, USA
    Curr Opin Infect Dis 19:594-606. 2006
    ..This review summarizes publications from the past year relevant to the impact of HIV diversity on drug resistance evolution and its potential clinical implications...
  3. pmc Impact of HIV-1 subtype and antiretroviral therapy on protease and reverse transcriptase genotype: results of a global collaboration
    Rami Kantor
    Division of Infectious Disease and Center for AIDS Research, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    PLoS Med 2:e112. 2005
    ..The genetic differences among HIV-1 subtypes may be critical to clinical management and drug resistance surveillance as antiretroviral treatment is expanded to regions of the world where diverse non-subtype-B viruses predominate...
  4. pmc Mutation patterns and structural correlates in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease following different protease inhibitor treatments
    Thomas D Wu
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Virol 77:4836-47. 2003
    ..The presence of mutational clusters provides insight into the complex mutational patterns required for HIV-1 protease inhibitor resistance...
  5. pmc HIV-1 pol mutation frequency by subtype and treatment experience: extension of the HIVseq program to seven non-B subtypes
    Soo Yon Rhee
    Division of Infectious Disease, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    AIDS 20:643-51. 2006
    ..As additional non-B sequences from persons with well-characterized antiretroviral treatment histories have become available, the program has been extended to subtypes A, C, D, F, G, CRF01, and CRF02...
  6. ncbi request reprint Drug resistance in plasma and breast milk after single-dose nevirapine in subtype C HIV type 1: population and clonal sequence analysis
    Seble Kassaye
    Department of Medicine and Infectious Diseases, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses 23:1055-61. 2007
    ..Population sequencing underestimates the diversity of NNRTI resistance mutations within minority populations following SD NVP in subtype C HIV-1 viral RNA in plasma and breast milk...
  7. pmc Envelope coreceptor tropism, drug resistance, and viral evolution among subtype C HIV-1-infected individuals receiving nonsuppressive antiretroviral therapy
    Seble Kassaye
    Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr 50:9-18. 2009
    ..In resource-constrained settings, antiretroviral treatment (ART) is often continued based on clinical and CD4 responses, without virologic monitoring. ART with incomplete viral suppression was assessed in 27 subjects with subtype C HIV-1...
  8. pmc Extended spectrum of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase mutations in patients receiving multiple nucleoside analog inhibitors
    Matthew J Gonzales
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Stanford University, CA, USA
    AIDS 17:791-9. 2003
    ..To characterize reverse transcriptase (RT) mutations by their association with extent of nucleoside RT inhibitor (NRTI) therapy. To identify mutational clusters in RT sequences from persons receiving multiple NRTI...
  9. pmc HIV-1 subtype C reverse transcriptase and protease genotypes in Zimbabwean patients failing antiretroviral therapy
    Rami Kantor
    Division of Infectious Diseases and AIDS Research, Stanford University, California 94305, USA
    AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses 18:1407-13. 2002
    ..Comparison of subtype C RT and protease sequences with a large database of subtype B sequences identified subtype C-specific polymorphisms and candidate drug resistance mutations...
  10. ncbi request reprint Drug resistance in non-subtype B HIV-1
    Rami Kantor
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Center for AIDS Research, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, room S 156, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Clin Virol 29:152-9. 2004
    ..Here we review HIV diversity and the published literature on drug resistance, comparing the known resistance mutations in individuals infected with subtype B to the growing experience in the treatment of non-subtype B HIV-1 worldwide...
  11. ncbi request reprint Breast-milk shedding of drug-resistant HIV-1 subtype C in women exposed to single-dose nevirapine
    Esther J Lee
    Center for AIDS Research, Division of Infectious Disease, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Infect Dis 192:1260-4. 2005
    ..In 20 paired BM and plasma samples, 65% of BM and 50% of plasma RT sequences had NNRTI-resistance mutations, with divergent mutation patterns...
  12. pmc Extensive drug resistance in HIV-infected Cambodian children who are undetected as failing first-line antiretroviral therapy by WHO 2010 guidelines
    Mia Coetzer
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Alpert Medical School, Brown University, Providence, RI 02906, USA
    AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses 29:985-92. 2013
    ..Affordable routine viral load monitoring allowing for early and more accurate treatment failure diagnosis is desperately needed in resource-limited settings...
  13. pmc Evolution of resistance to drugs in HIV-1-infected patients failing antiretroviral therapy
    Rami Kantor
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Center for AIDS Research, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    AIDS 18:1503-11. 2004
    ..The frequency with which new drug-resistance mutations (DRM) developed and their potential consequences in patients continuing unchanged treatment despite persistent viremia were assessed...
  14. pmc Human immunodeficiency virus reverse transcriptase and protease sequence database
    Soo Yon Rhee
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Nucleic Acids Res 31:298-303. 2003
    ..Sequence data on two new molecular targets of HIV drug therapy--gp41 (cell fusion) and integrase--will be added to the database in 2003...
  15. pmc High frequency of syncytium-inducing and CXCR4-tropic viruses among human immunodeficiency virus type 1 subtype C-infected patients receiving antiretroviral treatment
    Elizabeth R Johnston
    Division of Infectious Diseases and AIDS Research, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94035, USA
    J Virol 77:7682-8. 2003
    ..These results suggest that CXCR4-tropic viruses are present within the quasispecies of patients infected with subtype C virus and that antiretroviral treatment may create an environment for the emergence of CXCR4 tropism...
  16. ncbi request reprint Polymorphism in HIV-1 non-subtype B protease and reverse transcriptase and its potential impact on drug susceptibility and drug resistance evolution
    Rami Kantor
    Division of Infectious Diseases and AIDS Research, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    AIDS Rev 5:25-35. 2003
    ....
  17. pmc The HIV-1 Non-subtype B Workgroup: an international collaboration for the collection and analysis of HIV-1 non-subtype B data
    Rami Kantor
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, USA
    MedGenMed 7:71. 2005
  18. pmc Sequence quality analysis tool for HIV type 1 protease and reverse transcriptase
    Allison K Delong
    Center for Statistical Sciences, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02906, USA
    AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses 28:894-901. 2012
    ....
  19. doi request reprint QColors: an algorithm for conservative viral quasispecies reconstruction from short and non-contiguous next generation sequencing reads
    Austin Huang
    Division of Infectious Disease, Computer Science Department, Brown University, Box 1910, Providence, RI 02912, USA
    In Silico Biol 11:193-201. 2011
    ..We demonstrate the utility of the method by applying it to simulations based on actual intra-patient clonal HIV-1 sequencing data...
  20. pmc Short communication: Transmitted drug resistance and molecular epidemiology in antiretroviral naive HIV type 1-infected patients in Rhode Island
    Philip A Chan
    Division of Infectious Disease, The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, USA
    AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses 27:275-81. 2011
    ..Molecular epidemiological analysis and association of resistance with phylogenetic networks using data obtained for clinical purposes may serve as useful tools for the prevention of drug resistance transmission and for contact tracing...
  21. pmc Low prevalence of transmitted K65R and other tenofovir resistance mutations across different HIV-1 subtypes: implications for pre-exposure prophylaxis
    Philip A Chan
    Division of Infectious Diseases, The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, United States
    J Int AIDS Soc 15:17701. 2012
    ..The worldwide prevalence of transmitted tenofovir resistance in different HIV-1 subtypes is unknown...
  22. pmc Short communication: new HIV infections at Southern New England academic institutions: implications for prevention
    Philip A Chan
    Division of Infectious Diseases, The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI 02904, USA
    AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses 29:25-9. 2013
    ..Prevention strategies should focus on younger MSM, specifically college-age students who may be at increased risk of HIV infection...
  23. pmc Prediction of treatment failure using 2010 World Health Organization Guidelines is associated with high misclassification rates and drug resistance among HIV-infected Cambodian children
    Benjamin P Westley
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Alpert Medical School, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, USA
    Clin Infect Dis 55:432-40. 2012
    ..Revised WHO pediatric guidelines were published in 2010, but their ability to accurately identify virological failure is unclear...
  24. pmc Persistent genital tract HIV-1 RNA shedding after change in treatment regimens in antiretroviral-experienced women with detectable plasma viral load
    Kartik K Venkatesh
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Women and Infants Hospital of Rhode Island, Alpert Medical School, Brown University, Providence, RI, USA
    J Womens Health (Larchmt) 22:330-8. 2013
    ....
  25. pmc Detection of HIV-1 minority variants containing the K103N drug-resistance mutation using a simple method to amplify RNA targets (SMART)
    Kenneth Morabito
    Center for Biomedical Engineering, School of Engineering, Alpert Medical School, Brown University, Providence, RI, USA
    J Mol Diagn 15:401-12. 2013
    ..These results establish the groundwork for point-of-care drug resistance and viral load monitoring in clinical samples, which can revolutionize HIV patient care globally...
  26. pmc Evolution of primary protease inhibitor resistance mutations during protease inhibitor salvage therapy
    Rami Kantor
    Division of Infectious Diseases and AIDS Research, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94301, USA
    Antimicrob Agents Chemother 46:1086-92. 2002
    ..The persistence of L90M, V82A/F/T, G48V, and I84V during salvage therapy suggests that these mutations play a role in clinical resistance to multiple PIs...
  27. ncbi request reprint HIV type 1 genotypic variation in an antiretroviral treatment-naive population in southern India
    Pachamuthu Balakrishnan
    YRG CARE, Centre for AIDS Research and Education, VHS, Taramani, Chennai 600 113, India
    AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses 21:301-5. 2005
    ..Larger scale studies need to be undertaken to better define the genotypic variation of circulating Indian subtype C viruses and their potential impact on drug susceptibility and clinical outcome in treated individuals...
  28. ncbi request reprint K103N mutation in antiretroviral therapy-naive African patients infected with HIV type 1
    Omobosola Akinsete
    Department of Infectious Diseases, University of Minnesota Hennepin County Medical Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455, USA
    Clin Infect Dis 39:575-8. 2004
    ....
  29. pmc Discordances between interpretation algorithms for genotypic resistance to protease and reverse transcriptase inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus are subtype dependent
    Joke Snoeck
    Rega Institute for Medical Research, Minderbroedersstraat 10, 3000 Leuven, Belgium
    Antimicrob Agents Chemother 50:694-701. 2006
    ..It is not yet known whether therapy response is subtype dependent, but the advice given to clinicians based on a genotypic interpretation algorithm differs according to the subtype...
  30. ncbi request reprint A mutated CCR5 gene may have favorable prognostic implications in MS
    Rami Kantor
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel
    Neurology 61:238-40. 2003
    ..Progression to disability was prolonged in Delta32CCR5 homozygotes and heterozygotes compared with MS patients with the CCR5 wild-type genotype (p < 0.005). Mutated CCR5 allele may be considered a favorable prognostic factor in MS...