Liane Young

Summary

Affiliation: Boston College
Country: USA

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Psychopathy increases perceived moral permissibility of accidents
    Liane Young
    Department of Psychology, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467, USA
    J Abnorm Psychol 121:659-67. 2012
  2. doi request reprint When ignorance is no excuse: Different roles for intent across moral domains
    Liane Young
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MA, USA
    Cognition 120:202-14. 2011
  3. doi request reprint Where in the brain is morality? Everywhere and maybe nowhere
    Liane Young
    Department of Psychology, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA02467, USA
    Soc Neurosci 7:1-10. 2012
  4. doi request reprint The paradox of moral focus
    Liane Young
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MA, USA
    Cognition 119:166-78. 2011
  5. doi request reprint Neural evidence for "intuitive prosecution": the use of mental state information for negative moral verdicts
    Liane Young
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Soc Neurosci 6:302-15. 2011
  6. pmc Disruption of the right temporoparietal junction with transcranial magnetic stimulation reduces the role of beliefs in moral judgments
    Liane Young
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107:6753-8. 2010
  7. doi request reprint The neural basis of belief encoding and integration in moral judgment
    Liane Young
    Department of Psychology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Neuroimage 40:1912-20. 2008
  8. pmc The neural basis of the interaction between theory of mind and moral judgment
    Liane Young
    Department of Psychology, Harvard University, 33 Kirkland Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:8235-40. 2007
  9. pmc Harming ourselves and defiling others: what determines a moral domain?
    Alek Chakroff
    Department of Psychology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 8:e74434. 2013
  10. doi request reprint Innocent intentions: a correlation between forgiveness for accidental harm and neural activity
    Liane Young
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Neuropsychologia 47:2065-72. 2009

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications17

  1. doi request reprint Psychopathy increases perceived moral permissibility of accidents
    Liane Young
    Department of Psychology, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467, USA
    J Abnorm Psychol 121:659-67. 2012
    ..We suggest that this pattern reflects psychopaths' failure to appreciate the emotional aspect of the victim's experience of harm. These findings provide direct evidence of abnormal moral judgment in psychopathy...
  2. doi request reprint When ignorance is no excuse: Different roles for intent across moral domains
    Liane Young
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MA, USA
    Cognition 120:202-14. 2011
    ..The current results therefore reveal distinct cognitive signatures of distinct moral domains, and may inform the distinct functional roles of moral norms...
  3. doi request reprint Where in the brain is morality? Everywhere and maybe nowhere
    Liane Young
    Department of Psychology, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA02467, USA
    Soc Neurosci 7:1-10. 2012
    ..e., theory of mind) as case studies. Finally, we will consider possible cognitive accounts of a domain-specific morality: Does uniquely moral cognition exist?..
  4. doi request reprint The paradox of moral focus
    Liane Young
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MA, USA
    Cognition 119:166-78. 2011
    ....
  5. doi request reprint Neural evidence for "intuitive prosecution": the use of mental state information for negative moral verdicts
    Liane Young
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Soc Neurosci 6:302-15. 2011
    ..e., assigned blame or withheld praise, based solely on the agent's intent (attempted harm, accidental help). These results show enhanced attention to mental states for negative moral verdicts based exclusively on mental state information...
  6. pmc Disruption of the right temporoparietal junction with transcranial magnetic stimulation reduces the role of beliefs in moral judgments
    Liane Young
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107:6753-8. 2010
    ..Thus, interfering with activity in the RTPJ disrupts the capacity to use mental states in moral judgment, especially in the case of attempted harms...
  7. doi request reprint The neural basis of belief encoding and integration in moral judgment
    Liane Young
    Department of Psychology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Neuroimage 40:1912-20. 2008
    ..g., the outcome) for moral judgment...
  8. pmc The neural basis of the interaction between theory of mind and moral judgment
    Liane Young
    Department of Psychology, Harvard University, 33 Kirkland Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:8235-40. 2007
    ..The results not only suggest a general role for belief attribution during moral judgment, but also add detail to our understanding of the interaction between these processes at both the neural and behavioral levels...
  9. pmc Harming ourselves and defiling others: what determines a moral domain?
    Alek Chakroff
    Department of Psychology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 8:e74434. 2013
    ..These findings suggest that moral domains are defined not only by the kind of action but also by the target of the action. ..
  10. doi request reprint Innocent intentions: a correlation between forgiveness for accidental harm and neural activity
    Liane Young
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Neuropsychologia 47:2065-72. 2009
    ..This brain region, the right temporo-parietal junction, has been previously implicated in reasoning about other people's thoughts, beliefs, and intentions in moral and non-moral contexts...
  11. doi request reprint What gets the attention of the temporo-parietal junction? An fMRI investigation of attention and theory of mind
    Liane Young
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 43 Vassar Street, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Neuropsychologia 48:2658-64. 2010
    ..This pattern provides evidence for the ToM hypothesis: the response in these functional regions is selective for mental state content, whether that content is unexpected or expected...
  12. ncbi request reprint Investigating emotion in moral cognition: a review of evidence from functional neuroimaging and neuropsychology
    Liane Young
    Department of Psychology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Br Med Bull 84:69-79. 2007
    ..Neuroscience offers a unique perspective on this question by addressing whether brain regions associated with emotional processing are involved in moral cognition...
  13. pmc Damage to ventromedial prefrontal cortex impairs judgment of harmful intent
    Liane Young
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Neuron 65:845-51. 2010
    ..These results highlight the critical role of the VMPC in processing harmful intent for moral judgment...
  14. doi request reprint Patterns of moral judgment derive from nonmoral psychological representations
    Fiery Cushman
    Department of Psychology, Harvard University Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    Cogn Sci 35:1052-75. 2011
    ..We suggest that many of the specific patterns evident in our moral judgments in fact derive from nonmoral psychological mechanisms, and especially from the processes of causal and intentional attribution...
  15. ncbi request reprint The role of conscious reasoning and intuition in moral judgment: testing three principles of harm
    Fiery Cushman
    Department of Psychology, Harvard University, USA
    Psychol Sci 17:1082-9. 2006
    ....
  16. pmc Whose mind matters more--the agent or the artist? An investigation of ethical and aesthetic evaluations
    Angelina Hawley-Dolan
    Department of Psychology, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 8:e70759. 2013
    ....
  17. pmc Similar brain activation during false belief tasks in a large sample of adults with and without autism
    Nicholas Dufour
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 8:e75468. 2013
    ....