Karen M Warkentin

Summary

Affiliation: Boston University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Development, surface exposure, and embryo behavior affect oxygen levels in eggs of the red-eyed treefrog, Agalychnis callidryas
    Karen M Warkentin
    Department of Biology, Boston University, Boston, MA, 02215, USA
    Physiol Biochem Zool 78:956-66. 2005
  2. ncbi request reprint To hatch and hatch not: similar selective trade-offs but different responses to egg predators in two closely related, syntopic treefrogs
    Ivan Gomez-Mestre
    Department of Biology, Boston University, 5 Cummington Street, Boston, MA 02215, USA
    Oecologia 153:197-206. 2007
  3. ncbi request reprint Hatching timing, oxygen availability, and external gill regression in the tree frog, Agalychnis callidryas
    Karen M Warkentin
    Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, P O Box 2072, Balboa, Panama
    Physiol Biochem Zool 75:155-64. 2002
  4. ncbi request reprint Temporal pattern cues in vibrational risk assessment by embryos of the red-eyed treefrog, Agalychnis callidryas
    Karen M Warkentin
    Department of Biology, Boston University, Boston, 02215, USA
    J Exp Biol 209:1376-84. 2006
  5. doi request reprint Environmentally cued hatching across taxa: embryos respond to risk and opportunity
    Karen M Warkentin
    Department of Biology, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, USA
    Integr Comp Biol 51:14-25. 2011
  6. doi request reprint Plasticity of hatching in amphibians: evolution, trade-offs, cues and mechanisms
    Karen M Warkentin
    Department of Biology, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, USA
    Integr Comp Biol 51:111-27. 2011
  7. ncbi request reprint Flexible information sampling in vibrational assessment of predation risk by red-eyed treefrog embryos
    Karen M Warkentin
    Department of Biology, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, USA
    J Exp Biol 210:614-9. 2007
  8. ncbi request reprint Oxygen, gills, and embryo behavior: mechanisms of adaptive plasticity in hatching
    Karen M Warkentin
    Department of Biology, Boston University, 5 Cummington St, Boston, MA 02215, USA
    Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol 148:720-31. 2007
  9. pmc Prey responses to predator chemical cues: disentangling the importance of the number and biomass of prey consumed
    Michael W McCoy
    Department of Biology, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina, USA
    PLoS ONE 7:e47495. 2012
  10. pmc Spatial contagion drives colonization and recruitment of frogflies on clutches of red-eyed treefrogs
    Myra C Hughey
    Department of Biology, Boston University, 5 Cummington Street, Boston, MA 02215, USA
    Biol Lett 8:887-9. 2012

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications17

  1. ncbi request reprint Development, surface exposure, and embryo behavior affect oxygen levels in eggs of the red-eyed treefrog, Agalychnis callidryas
    Karen M Warkentin
    Department of Biology, Boston University, Boston, MA, 02215, USA
    Physiol Biochem Zool 78:956-66. 2005
    ..Embryos may maintain development under hypoxic conditions by strategic positioning of respiratory surfaces, particularly external gills, to exploit the patchy distribution of oxygen within their eggs...
  2. ncbi request reprint To hatch and hatch not: similar selective trade-offs but different responses to egg predators in two closely related, syntopic treefrogs
    Ivan Gomez-Mestre
    Department of Biology, Boston University, 5 Cummington Street, Boston, MA 02215, USA
    Oecologia 153:197-206. 2007
    ..callidryas, and spontaneous hatching is earlier and more synchronous. This is congruent with predictions based on selection by egg predators in the absence of a strong escape hatching response...
  3. ncbi request reprint Hatching timing, oxygen availability, and external gill regression in the tree frog, Agalychnis callidryas
    Karen M Warkentin
    Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, P O Box 2072, Balboa, Panama
    Physiol Biochem Zool 75:155-64. 2002
    ..Together, these results suggest that external gills enhance the oxygen uptake of embryos and are necessary to extend embryonic development past the onset of hatching competence...
  4. ncbi request reprint Temporal pattern cues in vibrational risk assessment by embryos of the red-eyed treefrog, Agalychnis callidryas
    Karen M Warkentin
    Department of Biology, Boston University, Boston, 02215, USA
    J Exp Biol 209:1376-84. 2006
    ..Vibration-cued hatching in A. callidryas embryos offers an opportunity to experimentally assess the behavioral decision rules underlying an effective and costly anti-predator defense...
  5. doi request reprint Environmentally cued hatching across taxa: embryos respond to risk and opportunity
    Karen M Warkentin
    Department of Biology, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, USA
    Integr Comp Biol 51:14-25. 2011
    ..Integrative and comparative studies of the timing of hatching will improve our understanding of embryos as both evolving and developing organisms...
  6. doi request reprint Plasticity of hatching in amphibians: evolution, trade-offs, cues and mechanisms
    Karen M Warkentin
    Department of Biology, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, USA
    Integr Comp Biol 51:111-27. 2011
    ..I discuss promising directions for research and the opportunities that the hatching of amphibians offers for integrative studies of the mechanisms, ecology and evolution of a critical transition between life-history stages...
  7. ncbi request reprint Flexible information sampling in vibrational assessment of predation risk by red-eyed treefrog embryos
    Karen M Warkentin
    Department of Biology, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, USA
    J Exp Biol 210:614-9. 2007
    ..This flexible sampling is consistent with embryos balancing a trade-off between the value and cost of information...
  8. ncbi request reprint Oxygen, gills, and embryo behavior: mechanisms of adaptive plasticity in hatching
    Karen M Warkentin
    Department of Biology, Boston University, 5 Cummington St, Boston, MA 02215, USA
    Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol 148:720-31. 2007
    ..Respiratory plasticity and oxygen-sensitive behavior appear critical for the hatching plasticity that balances a predation risk trade-off across life stages...
  9. pmc Prey responses to predator chemical cues: disentangling the importance of the number and biomass of prey consumed
    Michael W McCoy
    Department of Biology, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina, USA
    PLoS ONE 7:e47495. 2012
    ....
  10. pmc Spatial contagion drives colonization and recruitment of frogflies on clutches of red-eyed treefrogs
    Myra C Hughey
    Department of Biology, Boston University, 5 Cummington Street, Boston, MA 02215, USA
    Biol Lett 8:887-9. 2012
    ..This study demonstrates how reward contagion can influence colonization dynamics and suggests that colonization patterns caused by contagion may have important population- and community-level consequences...
  11. doi request reprint Frequency information in the vibration-cued escape hatching of red-eyed treefrogs
    Michael S Caldwell
    Department of Biology, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, USA
    J Exp Biol 212:566-75. 2009
    ..Moreover, comparing frequency spectra of predator and benign vibrations suggests that the presence of energy in frequencies outside the range characteristic of attacks might serve as an indicator of benign disturbance...
  12. doi request reprint External gills and adaptive embryo behavior facilitate synchronous development and hatching plasticity under respiratory constraint
    Jessica R Rogge
    Department of Biology, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, USA
    J Exp Biol 211:3627-35. 2008
    ..Such behavior may be critical both to delay hatching after hatching competence and to obtain sufficient oxygen for normal, synchronous development at earlier stages...
  13. doi request reprint Wasp predation drives the assembly of fungal and fly communities on frog egg masses
    Myra C Hughey
    Department of Biology, Boston University, 5 Cummington Street, Boston, MA, 02215, USA
    Oecologia 168:1057-68. 2012
    ..Processing chain interactions may be a generally important mechanism increasing the diversity of local communities, including very ephemeral ones...
  14. doi request reprint Vibrational signaling in the agonistic interactions of red-eyed treefrogs
    Michael S Caldwell
    Department of Biology, Boston University, 5 Cummington Street, Boston, MA 02215, USA
    Curr Biol 20:1012-7. 2010
    ....
  15. doi request reprint Predicting predation through prey ontogeny using size-dependent functional response models
    Michael W McCoy
    Department of Biology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, USA
    Am Nat 177:752-66. 2011
    ..Our results highlight the importance of incorporating prey size when modeling consumer-prey dynamics in size-structured, growing prey populations...
  16. ncbi request reprint Amphibian embryo and parental defenses and a larval predator reduce egg mortality from water mold
    Ivan Gomez-Mestre
    Department of Biology, Boston University, 5 Cummington Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA
    Ecology 87:2570-81. 2006
    ..Finally, despite being potential toad hatchling predators, R. sylvatica tadpoles can have a positive effect on B. americanus eggs. They eat water mold off infected toad clutches, increasing their hatching success...
  17. ncbi request reprint Opposite shifts in size at metamorphosis in response to larval and metamorph predators
    James R Vonesh
    Department of Biology, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, USA
    Ecology 87:556-62. 2006
    ..Interestingly, predator effects on larval duration were not independent; tadpoles delayed emerging in response to spiders, but only in the absence of water bugs...