Jeremy M DeSilva

Summary

Affiliation: Boston University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Brief communication: a midtarsal (midfoot) break in the human foot
    Jeremy M DeSilva
    Department of Anthropology, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 151:495-9. 2013
  2. doi request reprint The lower limb and mechanics of walking in Australopithecus sediba
    Jeremy M DeSilva
    Department of Anthropology, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, USA
    Science 340:1232999. 2013
  3. doi request reprint A complete second metatarsal (StW 89) from Sterkfontein Member 4, South Africa
    Jeremy M DeSilva
    Department of Anthropology, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, USA
    J Hum Evol 63:487-96. 2012
  4. doi request reprint A comparative study of the trabecular bony architecture of the talus in humans, non-human primates, and Australopithecus
    Jeremy M DeSilva
    Department of Anthropology, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, USA
    J Hum Evol 63:536-51. 2012
  5. doi request reprint Revisiting the "midtarsal break"
    Jeremy M DeSilva
    Department of Anthropology, Boston University, MA 02215, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 141:245-58. 2010
  6. pmc Lucy's flat feet: the relationship between the ankle and rearfoot arching in early hominins
    Jeremy M DeSilva
    Department of Anthropology, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 5:e14432. 2010
  7. pmc A shift toward birthing relatively large infants early in human evolution
    Jeremy M DeSilva
    Department of Anthropology, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108:1022-7. 2011
  8. doi request reprint A hominoid distal tibia from the Miocene of Pakistan
    Jeremy M DeSilva
    Department of Anthropology, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, USA
    J Hum Evol 58:147-54. 2010
  9. doi request reprint The Olduvai Hominid 8 foot: adult or subadult?
    Jeremy M DeSilva
    Department of Anthropology, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, USA
    J Hum Evol 58:418-23. 2010
  10. doi request reprint The effect of the achilles tendon on trabecular structure in the primate calcaneus
    Sharon Kuo
    Department of Anthropology, Boston University, 232 Bay State Road, Boston, Massachusetts Department of Applied Forensic Sciences, Mercyhurst University, 501 E 38th Street, Erie, Pennsylvania
    Anat Rec (Hoboken) 296:1509-17. 2013

Detail Information

Publications10

  1. doi request reprint Brief communication: a midtarsal (midfoot) break in the human foot
    Jeremy M DeSilva
    Department of Anthropology, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 151:495-9. 2013
    ..These data are in accordance with Elftman (Clin Orthop 16 (1960) 41-45) who suggested that pronation aligns the axes of the transverse tarsal joint, permitting elevated midfoot mobility...
  2. doi request reprint The lower limb and mechanics of walking in Australopithecus sediba
    Jeremy M DeSilva
    Department of Anthropology, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, USA
    Science 340:1232999. 2013
    ..These bipedal mechanics are different from those often reconstructed for other australopiths and suggest that there may have been several forms of bipedalism during the Plio-Pleistocene...
  3. doi request reprint A complete second metatarsal (StW 89) from Sterkfontein Member 4, South Africa
    Jeremy M DeSilva
    Department of Anthropology, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, USA
    J Hum Evol 63:487-96. 2012
    ..Additional fossil evidence will be required to determine if differences between this bone and other second metatarsals from Sterkfontein reflect normal variation in an evolving lineage, or taxonomic diversity...
  4. doi request reprint A comparative study of the trabecular bony architecture of the talus in humans, non-human primates, and Australopithecus
    Jeremy M DeSilva
    Department of Anthropology, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, USA
    J Hum Evol 63:536-51. 2012
    ..These results collectively suggest that the microarchitecture of the talus does not simply reflect the loading environment, limiting its utility in reconstructing locomotion in fossil primates...
  5. doi request reprint Revisiting the "midtarsal break"
    Jeremy M DeSilva
    Department of Anthropology, Boston University, MA 02215, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 141:245-58. 2010
    ..2 million years ago. These data illuminate the evolution of the longitudinal arch and show further evidence of constraints on the arboreal capacity in early hominins...
  6. pmc Lucy's flat feet: the relationship between the ankle and rearfoot arching in early hominins
    Jeremy M DeSilva
    Department of Anthropology, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 5:e14432. 2010
    ..Paleoanthropologists have relied on footprints and bony correlates of arch development, though little consensus has emerged as to when the arch evolved...
  7. pmc A shift toward birthing relatively large infants early in human evolution
    Jeremy M DeSilva
    Department of Anthropology, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108:1022-7. 2011
    ..Carrying such proportionately large infants may have limited arboreality in Australopithecus females and may have selected for alloparenting behavior earlier in human evolution than previously thought...
  8. doi request reprint A hominoid distal tibia from the Miocene of Pakistan
    Jeremy M DeSilva
    Department of Anthropology, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, USA
    J Hum Evol 58:147-54. 2010
    ..Based on the limited postcranial remains from S. indicus, we hypothesize that this taxon exhibited substantial body size dimorphism...
  9. doi request reprint The Olduvai Hominid 8 foot: adult or subadult?
    Jeremy M DeSilva
    Department of Anthropology, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, USA
    J Hum Evol 58:418-23. 2010
    ..In total, the results of this study suggest that the OH 8 foot most likely belonged to an adult hominin...
  10. doi request reprint The effect of the achilles tendon on trabecular structure in the primate calcaneus
    Sharon Kuo
    Department of Anthropology, Boston University, 232 Bay State Road, Boston, Massachusetts Department of Applied Forensic Sciences, Mercyhurst University, 501 E 38th Street, Erie, Pennsylvania
    Anat Rec (Hoboken) 296:1509-17. 2013
    ..These results imply that internal bone architecture may not be informative for reconstructing Achilles tendon anatomy in early hominins. Anat Rec, 296:1509-1517, 2013. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. ..