Robert E Page

Summary

Affiliation: Arizona State University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Genetics of reproduction and regulation of honeybee (Apis mellifera L.) social behavior
    Robert E Page
    School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287, USA
    Annu Rev Genet 46:97-119. 2012
  2. pmc Behavioral genomics of honeybee foraging and nest defense
    Greg J Hunt
    Department of Entomology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA
    Naturwissenschaften 94:247-67. 2007
  3. pmc The making of a social insect: developmental architectures of social design
    Robert E Page
    Arizona State University, School of Life Sciences, Tempe, AZ 85287 4501, USA
    Bioessays 29:334-43. 2007
  4. pmc The genetic basis of transgressive ovary size in honeybee workers
    Timothy A Linksvayer
    School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 4501, USA
    Genetics 183:693-707, 1SI-13SI. 2009
  5. pmc Complex social behaviour derived from maternal reproductive traits
    Gro V Amdam
    Arizona State University, School of Life Sciences, Tempe, Arizona 85287, USA
    Nature 439:76-8. 2006
  6. pmc Hormone response to bidirectional selection on social behavior
    Gro V Amdam
    School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287, USA
    Evol Dev 12:428-36. 2010
  7. pmc PDK1 and HR46 gene homologs tie social behavior to ovary signals
    Ying Wang
    School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA
    PLoS ONE 4:e4899. 2009
  8. pmc The nurse's load: early-life exposure to brood-rearing affects behavior and lifespan in honey bees (Apis mellifera)
    Gro V Amdam
    School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 4501, USA
    Exp Gerontol 44:467-71. 2009
  9. pmc Downregulation of vitellogenin gene activity increases the gustatory responsiveness of honey bee workers (Apis mellifera)
    Gro V Amdam
    Arizona State University, School of Life Sciences, Tempe, AZ 85287 4501, USA
    Behav Brain Res 169:201-5. 2006
  10. doi request reprint Surgically increased ovarian mass in the honey bee confirms link between reproductive physiology and worker behavior
    Ying Wang
    School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287, USA
    J Insect Physiol 56:1816-24. 2010

Detail Information

Publications27

  1. doi request reprint Genetics of reproduction and regulation of honeybee (Apis mellifera L.) social behavior
    Robert E Page
    School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287, USA
    Annu Rev Genet 46:97-119. 2012
    ..This is remarkable because worker honeybees have reduced reproductive organs and are normally sterile; however, the reproductive regulatory network has been co-opted for behavioral division of labor...
  2. pmc Behavioral genomics of honeybee foraging and nest defense
    Greg J Hunt
    Department of Entomology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA
    Naturwissenschaften 94:247-67. 2007
    ..These studies are the first step in linking natural variation in honeybee social behavior to the identification of underlying genes...
  3. pmc The making of a social insect: developmental architectures of social design
    Robert E Page
    Arizona State University, School of Life Sciences, Tempe, AZ 85287 4501, USA
    Bioessays 29:334-43. 2007
    ..These insights explain how complex social behavior can evolve from heterochronic changes in reproductive signaling systems that govern ubiquitous and ancient relationships between behavior and ovarian development...
  4. pmc The genetic basis of transgressive ovary size in honeybee workers
    Timothy A Linksvayer
    School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 4501, USA
    Genetics 183:693-707, 1SI-13SI. 2009
    ..We discuss how the phenotype of extreme worker ovariole numbers and the underlying genetic factors we identified could be linked to the development of queen traits...
  5. pmc Complex social behaviour derived from maternal reproductive traits
    Gro V Amdam
    Arizona State University, School of Life Sciences, Tempe, Arizona 85287, USA
    Nature 439:76-8. 2006
    ....
  6. pmc Hormone response to bidirectional selection on social behavior
    Gro V Amdam
    School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287, USA
    Evol Dev 12:428-36. 2010
    ..These networks may bias a bee's adult phenotype by endocrine effects on early developmental processes that regulate variation in reproductive traits...
  7. pmc PDK1 and HR46 gene homologs tie social behavior to ovary signals
    Ying Wang
    School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA
    PLoS ONE 4:e4899. 2009
    ..Also, they outline how selection may have acted on gene networks that affect reproductive resource allocation and behavior to facilitate the evolution of social foraging in honey bees...
  8. pmc The nurse's load: early-life exposure to brood-rearing affects behavior and lifespan in honey bees (Apis mellifera)
    Gro V Amdam
    School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 4501, USA
    Exp Gerontol 44:467-71. 2009
    ..Our findings are consistent with the roles of vitellogenin in regulation of honey bee behavior and lifespan...
  9. pmc Downregulation of vitellogenin gene activity increases the gustatory responsiveness of honey bee workers (Apis mellifera)
    Gro V Amdam
    Arizona State University, School of Life Sciences, Tempe, AZ 85287 4501, USA
    Behav Brain Res 169:201-5. 2006
    ..Our observations suggest that vitellogenin is an important regulator of long-term changes in honey bee behavior...
  10. doi request reprint Surgically increased ovarian mass in the honey bee confirms link between reproductive physiology and worker behavior
    Ying Wang
    School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287, USA
    J Insect Physiol 56:1816-24. 2010
    ..Our data establish that social insect worker behavior can be directly influenced by ovaries, and that HR46 expression changes with ovary size independent of vitellogenin...
  11. pmc The genetic architecture of sucrose responsiveness in the honeybee (Apis mellifera L.)
    Olav Rueppell
    School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 4501, USA
    Genetics 172:243-51. 2006
    ..Understanding this behavioral syndrome is important for understanding the division of labor in social insects and social evolution itself...
  12. doi request reprint Honeybee social regulatory networks are shaped by colony-level selection
    Timothy A Linksvayer
    School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287, USA
    Am Nat 173:E99-E107. 2009
    ..quot; Thus, colony-level selection has produced strains with distinct combinations of socially interacting genes, which make up the social networks that regulate development and expressed phenotypes...
  13. pmc Regulation of behaviorally associated gene networks in worker honey bee ovaries
    Ying Wang
    School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287, USA
    J Exp Biol 215:124-34. 2012
    ..Furthermore, robust correlations between ovary size and neuraland endocrine response genes are consistent with the hypothesized roles of the ovaries in honey bee behavioral regulation...
  14. pmc 8. The development and evolution of division of labor and foraging specialization in a social insect (Apis mellifera L.)
    Robert E Page
    School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, AZ 85287, USA
    Curr Top Dev Biol 74:253-86. 2006
    ....
  15. pmc Ovarian control of nectar collection in the honey bee (Apis mellifera)
    Adam J Siegel
    School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 7:e33465. 2012
    ..This supports our proposed mechanism. As nectar and pollen loading are not independent, a mechanism impacting nectar load size would also impact pollen load size...
  16. pmc Intergenerational transfers may have decoupled physiological and chronological age in a eusocial insect
    Gro V Amdam
    Arizona State University, School of Life Sciences, Tempe, AZ 85287, USA
    Ageing Res Rev 4:398-408. 2005
    ..In the following, we show how a recent theory that includes resource transfers can be used to elucidate patterns of senescence in eusocial, non-reproducing individuals like the honey bee worker...
  17. pmc Rearing honey bees, Apis mellifera, in vitro 1: effects of sugar concentrations on survival and development
    Osman Kaftanoglu
    1 School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 4501, USA
    J Insect Sci 11:96. 2011
    ..High sugar concentrations (12%G+12%F) increased the number of queens and intercastes...
  18. ncbi request reprint Genetic sex determination and extinction
    Philip W Hedrick
    School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287, USA
    Trends Ecol Evol 21:55-7. 2006
    ....
  19. pmc Biodemographic analysis of male honey bee mortality
    Olav Rueppell
    Department of Biology, University of North Carolina, Greensboro, NC 27402 6170, USA
    Aging Cell 4:13-9. 2005
    ..The overall mortality curve is caused by the interaction of the distribution of age at foraging initiation and the mortality function during the active (flight) lifespan...
  20. pmc The genetic architecture of the behavioral ontogeny of foraging in honeybee workers
    Olav Rueppell
    Department of Biology, University of North Carolina, Greensboro, North Carolina 27402 6174, USA
    Genetics 167:1767-79. 2004
    ..Both maps confirm the extraordinary recombinational size of the honeybee genome. On the basis of these maps, we report four new significant QTL and two more suggestive QTL that influence the initiation of foraging...
  21. pmc Reproductive ground plan may mediate colony-level selection effects on individual foraging behavior in honey bees
    Gro V Amdam
    Department of Entomology, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101:11350-5. 2004
    ..We suggest that exploitation of this ground plan plays a fundamental role in the evolution of social insect societies...
  22. pmc The gene vitellogenin has multiple coordinating effects on social organization
    C Mindy Nelson
    Department of Entomology, University of California Davis, Davis, California, United States of America
    PLoS Biol 5:e62. 2007
    ..Further, they demonstrate for the first time how coordinated control of multiple social life-history traits can originate via the pleiotropic effects of a single gene that affects multiple physiological processes...
  23. pmc Regulation of life history determines lifespan of worker honey bees (Apis mellifera L.)
    Olav Rueppell
    Department of Biology, 312 Eberhart Building, University of North Carolina, Greensboro, 1000 Spring Garden Street, Greensboro, NC 27403, USA
    Exp Gerontol 42:1020-32. 2007
    ..Overall, honey bee workers exhibit a logistic mortality dynamic which is mainly caused by the age-dependent transition from a low mortality pre-foraging state to a higher mortality foraging state...
  24. ncbi request reprint The gene csd is the primary signal for sexual development in the honeybee and encodes an SR-type protein
    Martin Beye
    Martin Luther Universitat Halle Wittenberg, Institut fur Zoologie, Biozentrum, Weinberg Weg 22, 06120, Halle, Germany
    Cell 114:419-29. 2003
    ..Structural similarity of csd with tra genes of Dipteran insects suggests some functional relation of what would otherwise appear to be unrelated sex-determination mechanisms...
  25. ncbi request reprint Levels of behavioral organization and the evolution of division of labor
    Robert E Page
    Department of Entomology, University of California, Davis 95616, USA
    Naturwissenschaften 89:91-106. 2002
    ..We show how different levels of organization share common features and are linked through common mechanisms. We focus on the behavior of the honey bee, the best studied of all social insects...
  26. pmc Exceptionally high levels of recombination across the honey bee genome
    Martin Beye
    Institute of Genetics, Heinrich Heine Universit├Ąt Duesseldorf, Duesseldorf 40225, Germany
    Genome Res 16:1339-44. 2006
    ..Very few transposons and no retrotransposons are present in the high-recombining genome. We propose evolutionary explanations for the exceptionally high genome-wide recombination rate...
  27. pmc The emergence of hymenopteran genetics
    Robert E Page
    Department of Entomology, University of California, Davis, California 95616, USA
    Genetics 160:375-9. 2002