Philip McClure

Summary

Affiliation: Arcadia University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint A randomized controlled comparison of stretching procedures for posterior shoulder tightness
    Philip McClure
    Department of Physical Therapy, Arcadia University, Glenside, PA 19038, USA
    J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 37:108-14. 2007
  2. doi request reprint Evaluation and management of scapular dysfunction
    Philip McClure
    Department of Physical Therapy, Arcadia University, Glenside, PA 19038, USA
    Sports Med Arthrosc 20:39-48. 2012
  3. pmc A clinical method for identifying scapular dyskinesis, part 1: reliability
    Philip McClure
    Arcadia University, Department of Physical Therapy, Glenside, PA 19038, USA
    J Athl Train 44:160-4. 2009
  4. ncbi request reprint Shoulder function and 3-dimensional scapular kinematics in people with and without shoulder impingement syndrome
    Philip W McClure
    Department of Physical Therapy, Arcadia University, Glenside, PA 19038, USA
    Phys Ther 86:1075-90. 2006
  5. ncbi request reprint Evidenced-based practice: worthy pursuit or passing trend?
    Philip McClure
    Arcadia University, Glenside, PA 19038, USA
    J Hand Ther 15:377-8. 2002
  6. ncbi request reprint Correlation statistics: review of the basics and some common pitfalls
    Philip McClure
    Department of Physical Therapy, Arcadia University, Glenside, PA 19038, USA
    J Hand Ther 18:378-80. 2005
  7. ncbi request reprint Shoulder function and 3-dimensional kinematics in people with shoulder impingement syndrome before and after a 6-week exercise program
    Philip W McClure
    Department of Physical Therapy, Arcadia University, 450 S Easton Rd, Glenside, PA 19038, USA
    Phys Ther 84:832-48. 2004
  8. ncbi request reprint Evidence-based practice: an example related to the use of splinting in a patient with carpal tunnel syndrome
    Philip McClure
    Arcadia University, Glenside, PA 19038, USA
    J Hand Ther 16:256-63. 2003
  9. ncbi request reprint Understanding the concept of effect size to guide clinical decisions about treatment
    James D Tomlinson
    Arcadia University, Glenside, Pennsylvania 19038, USA
    J Hand Ther 20:277-9. 2007
  10. ncbi request reprint Three-dimensional scapulothoracic motion during active and passive arm elevation
    D David Ebaugh
    Rehabilitation Sciences Biomechanics Laboratory, Drexel University, 245 North 15th Street MS 502, Philadelphia, PA 19102 1192, USA
    Clin Biomech (Bristol, Avon) 20:700-9. 2005

Detail Information

Publications15

  1. ncbi request reprint A randomized controlled comparison of stretching procedures for posterior shoulder tightness
    Philip McClure
    Department of Physical Therapy, Arcadia University, Glenside, PA 19038, USA
    J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 37:108-14. 2007
    ..Randomized controlled trial,..
  2. doi request reprint Evaluation and management of scapular dysfunction
    Philip McClure
    Department of Physical Therapy, Arcadia University, Glenside, PA 19038, USA
    Sports Med Arthrosc 20:39-48. 2012
    ..Although several studies suggest a relationship between abnormal scapular motion and symptoms, strong evidence directly supporting a causal relationship is lacking and further work is necessary to clarify this relationship...
  3. pmc A clinical method for identifying scapular dyskinesis, part 1: reliability
    Philip McClure
    Arcadia University, Department of Physical Therapy, Glenside, PA 19038, USA
    J Athl Train 44:160-4. 2009
    ..Reliable and valid clinical methods for detecting scapular dyskinesis are lacking...
  4. ncbi request reprint Shoulder function and 3-dimensional scapular kinematics in people with and without shoulder impingement syndrome
    Philip W McClure
    Department of Physical Therapy, Arcadia University, Glenside, PA 19038, USA
    Phys Ther 86:1075-90. 2006
    ..The purpose of this study was to compare 3-dimensional scapular kinematics, shoulder range of motion, shoulder muscle force, and posture in subjects with and without primary shoulder impingement syndrome...
  5. ncbi request reprint Evidenced-based practice: worthy pursuit or passing trend?
    Philip McClure
    Arcadia University, Glenside, PA 19038, USA
    J Hand Ther 15:377-8. 2002
  6. ncbi request reprint Correlation statistics: review of the basics and some common pitfalls
    Philip McClure
    Department of Physical Therapy, Arcadia University, Glenside, PA 19038, USA
    J Hand Ther 18:378-80. 2005
  7. ncbi request reprint Shoulder function and 3-dimensional kinematics in people with shoulder impingement syndrome before and after a 6-week exercise program
    Philip W McClure
    Department of Physical Therapy, Arcadia University, 450 S Easton Rd, Glenside, PA 19038, USA
    Phys Ther 84:832-48. 2004
    ..Specifically, the purpose was to identify changes that might occur in 3-dimensional scapular kinematics, physical impairments, and functional limitations...
  8. ncbi request reprint Evidence-based practice: an example related to the use of splinting in a patient with carpal tunnel syndrome
    Philip McClure
    Arcadia University, Glenside, PA 19038, USA
    J Hand Ther 16:256-63. 2003
    ..A more complete search would be indicated for areas that represent common or frequent problems for a particular clinical setting, for which basic procedural guidelines might be developed...
  9. ncbi request reprint Understanding the concept of effect size to guide clinical decisions about treatment
    James D Tomlinson
    Arcadia University, Glenside, Pennsylvania 19038, USA
    J Hand Ther 20:277-9. 2007
  10. ncbi request reprint Three-dimensional scapulothoracic motion during active and passive arm elevation
    D David Ebaugh
    Rehabilitation Sciences Biomechanics Laboratory, Drexel University, 245 North 15th Street MS 502, Philadelphia, PA 19102 1192, USA
    Clin Biomech (Bristol, Avon) 20:700-9. 2005
    ..The aim of this study was to determine the effects of different levels of muscle activity (active versus passive arm elevation) on three-dimensional scapulothoracic motion...
  11. ncbi request reprint Scapulothoracic and glenohumeral kinematics following an external rotation fatigue protocol
    D David Ebaugh
    Programs in Rehabilitation Sciences, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA 19102 1192, USA
    J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 36:557-71. 2006
    ..Repeated-measures experimental design...
  12. ncbi request reprint Anatomical and biomechanical mechanisms of subacromial impingement syndrome
    Lori A Michener
    Department of Physical Therapy, Medical College of Virginia, Virginia Commonwealth University, P O Box 980224, Richmond, VA 23298, USA
    Clin Biomech (Bristol, Avon) 18:369-79. 2003
    ..These entities may lead to or cause dysfunctional glenohumeral and scapulothoracic movement patterns. These various mechanisms, singularly or in combination may cause subacromial impingement syndrome...
  13. ncbi request reprint Effect of the Scapula Reposition Test on shoulder impingement symptoms and elevation strength in overhead athletes
    Angela R Tate
    H S Therapy Associates, Inc, Lower Gwynedd, PA, USA
    J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 38:4-11. 2008
    ..Two group, repeated measures design...
  14. ncbi request reprint Effects of shoulder muscle fatigue caused by repetitive overhead activities on scapulothoracic and glenohumeral kinematics
    D David Ebaugh
    Programs in Rehabilitation Sciences, Rehabilitation Sciences Biomechanics Lab, Drexel University, 245 North, 15th Street, MS 502, Philadelphia, PA 19102 1192, USA
    J Electromyogr Kinesiol 16:224-35. 2006
    ..Further studies are needed to determine what effects these changes have on the soft tissues and mechanics of the shoulder complex...
  15. ncbi request reprint American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Standardized Shoulder Assessment Form, patient self-report section: reliability, validity, and responsiveness
    Lori A Michener
    Department of Physical Therapy, Virginia Commonwealth University Medical College of Virginia, Richmond, VA 23298, USA
    J Shoulder Elbow Surg 11:587-94. 2002
    ..4. The minimal detectable change was 9.7 ASES points (90% CI, 16), and the minimal clinically important difference was 6.4 ASES points. The results indicate that the ASES is a reliable, valid, and responsive outcome tool...