Michael E Hood

Summary

Affiliation: Amherst College
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Extensive divergence between mating-type chromosomes of the anther-smut fungus
    Michael E Hood
    Department of Biology, Amherst College, Amherst, MA 01002, USA
    Genetics 193:309-15. 2013
  2. doi request reprint Linkage to the mating-type locus across the genus Microbotryum: insights into nonrecombining chromosomes
    Elsa Petit
    Department of Biology, Amherst College, Amherst, Massachusetts 01002, USA
    Evolution 66:3519-33. 2012
  3. pmc Cophylogeny of the anther smut fungi and their caryophyllaceous hosts: prevalence of host shifts and importance of delimiting parasite species for inferring cospeciation
    Guislaine Refregier
    Ecologie, Systematique et Evolution, Batiment 360, Universite Paris Sud, F 91405 Orsay cedex, France
    BMC Evol Biol 8:100. 2008
  4. pmc Distribution of the anther-smut pathogen Microbotryum on species of the Caryophyllaceae
    Michael E Hood
    Department of Biology, Amherst College, Amherst, MA, USA
    New Phytol 187:217-29. 2010
  5. pmc Ancient trans-specific polymorphism at pheromone receptor genes in basidiomycetes
    Benjamin Devier
    Department of Biology, Amherst College, Amherst, Massachusetts 01002 5000, USA
    Genetics 181:209-23. 2009
  6. pmc Within-host competitive exclusion among species of the anther smut pathogen
    Alexander Gold
    Department of Biology, Amherst College, Amherst, MA 01002, USA
    BMC Ecol 9:11. 2009
  7. pmc Repeat-induced point mutation and the population structure of transposable elements in Microbotryum violaceum
    Michael E Hood
    Department of Biology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22903, USA
    Genetics 170:1081-9. 2005
  8. pmc Patterns of repeat-induced point mutation in transposable elements of basidiomycete fungi
    Felix Horns
    Department of Biology, Amherst College
    Genome Biol Evol 4:240-7. 2012
  9. pmc Plant species descriptions show signs of disease
    Michael E Hood
    Department of Biology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22903, USA
    Proc Biol Sci 270:S156-8. 2003
  10. pmc Shared forces of sex chromosome evolution in haploid-mating and diploid-mating organisms: Microbotryum violaceum and other model organisms
    Michael E Hood
    Department of Biology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville 22903, USA
    Genetics 168:141-6. 2004

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications17

  1. pmc Extensive divergence between mating-type chromosomes of the anther-smut fungus
    Michael E Hood
    Department of Biology, Amherst College, Amherst, MA 01002, USA
    Genetics 193:309-15. 2013
    ..This study encourages the comparison of forces that may drive large-scale recombination suppression in fungi and other eukaryotes characterized by dimorphic chromosome pairs associated with sexual life cycles...
  2. doi request reprint Linkage to the mating-type locus across the genus Microbotryum: insights into nonrecombining chromosomes
    Elsa Petit
    Department of Biology, Amherst College, Amherst, Massachusetts 01002, USA
    Evolution 66:3519-33. 2012
    ..g., gene conversion) and encourages further work to dissect the evolutionary processes acting upon genomic regions that determine mating compatibility...
  3. pmc Cophylogeny of the anther smut fungi and their caryophyllaceous hosts: prevalence of host shifts and importance of delimiting parasite species for inferring cospeciation
    Guislaine Refregier
    Ecologie, Systematique et Evolution, Batiment 360, Universite Paris Sud, F 91405 Orsay cedex, France
    BMC Evol Biol 8:100. 2008
    ..A second aim of this study was therefore to evaluate the impact of species delimitation on the inferences of cospeciation...
  4. pmc Distribution of the anther-smut pathogen Microbotryum on species of the Caryophyllaceae
    Michael E Hood
    Department of Biology, Amherst College, Amherst, MA, USA
    New Phytol 187:217-29. 2010
    ....
  5. pmc Ancient trans-specific polymorphism at pheromone receptor genes in basidiomycetes
    Benjamin Devier
    Department of Biology, Amherst College, Amherst, Massachusetts 01002 5000, USA
    Genetics 181:209-23. 2009
    ....
  6. pmc Within-host competitive exclusion among species of the anther smut pathogen
    Alexander Gold
    Department of Biology, Amherst College, Amherst, MA 01002, USA
    BMC Ecol 9:11. 2009
    ..Here, using two pathogen species that are frequently found in sympatry, we investigated whether the antagonism seen among genotypes of the same species cascades up to influence competition among pathogen species...
  7. pmc Repeat-induced point mutation and the population structure of transposable elements in Microbotryum violaceum
    Michael E Hood
    Department of Biology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22903, USA
    Genetics 170:1081-9. 2005
    ..Therefore, sequence variation of transposable elements in M. violaceum appears to be driven by selection for transposition ability in combination with the context-specific forces of the RIP and gene conversion...
  8. pmc Patterns of repeat-induced point mutation in transposable elements of basidiomycete fungi
    Felix Horns
    Department of Biology, Amherst College
    Genome Biol Evol 4:240-7. 2012
    ..These findings imply that coevolutionary interactions between TEs and a hypermutating genome defense are stable over long evolutionary timescales...
  9. pmc Plant species descriptions show signs of disease
    Michael E Hood
    Department of Biology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22903, USA
    Proc Biol Sci 270:S156-8. 2003
    ..This raises the question of whether diseased type specimens have erroneously been given unique species names...
  10. pmc Shared forces of sex chromosome evolution in haploid-mating and diploid-mating organisms: Microbotryum violaceum and other model organisms
    Michael E Hood
    Department of Biology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville 22903, USA
    Genetics 168:141-6. 2004
    ..the autosomes. We conclude that restricted recombination, rather than asymmetrical sheltering, hemizygosity, or dosage compensation, is sufficient to account for the common sex chromosome characteristics...
  11. ncbi request reprint Molecular virology: was the 1918 flu avian in origin?
    Janis Antonovics
    Department of Biology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904, USA
    Nature 440:E9; discussion E9-10. 2006
    ..However, we do not believe that this conclusion, which has been widely disseminated in the popular press and in scientific journals, is supported by their phylogenetic evidence...
  12. pmc Mating within the meiotic tetrad and the maintenance of genomic heterozygosity
    Michael E Hood
    Department of Biology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22903, USA
    Genetics 166:1751-9. 2004
    ..We describe a scenario where the mating system of automixis with first-division restitution is the result of feedback mechanisms to control exposure of genetic load...
  13. ncbi request reprint The evolution of intratetrad mating rates
    Louise J Johnson
    Department of Biology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22903, USA
    Evolution 59:2525-32. 2005
    ..However, under recurrent mutation, alleles for obligate intratetrad mating invade only very slowly, perhaps explaining why outcrossing can persist at low frequencies in a largely intratetrad mating population...
  14. ncbi request reprint Repetitive DNA in the automictic fungus Microbotryum violaceum
    Michael E Hood
    Department of Biology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22903, USA
    Genetica 124:1-10. 2005
    ..violaceum. The differentiated pair of fungal sex chromosomes and suppression of recombination may be the major forces determining the highly repetitive content in the small genome of M. violaceum...
  15. pmc The evolution of disease resistance and tolerance in spatially structured populations
    Felix Horns
    Department of Biology, Amherst College Amherst, Massachusetts 01002
    Ecol Evol 2:1705-11. 2012
    ....
  16. ncbi request reprint Karyotypic similarity identifies multiple host-shifts of a pathogenic fungus in natural populations
    Michael E Hood
    Department of Biology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22903, USA
    Infect Genet Evol 2:167-72. 2003
    ..The results indicated at least two independent host-shifts, one in the US and perhaps two in Italy. The karyotype and ecological data indicate that the direction of the host-shifts is from S. latifolia to S. vulgaris...
  17. pmc Dimorphic mating-type chromosomes in the fungus Microbotryum violaceum
    Michael E Hood
    Department of Biology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22903, USA
    Genetics 160:457-61. 2002
    ..Several DNA sequences that show sequence similarity to transposons were isolated from these sex chromosomes...