James R Shoblock

Summary

Affiliation: Albany Medical College
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Neurochemical and behavioral differences between d-methamphetamine and d-amphetamine in rats
    James R Shoblock
    Center for Neuropharmacology and Neuroscience, Albany Medical College, 47 New Scotland Avenue MC 136, Albany, NY 12208, USA
    Psychopharmacology (Berl) 165:359-69. 2003
  2. ncbi request reprint Differences between d-methamphetamine and d-amphetamine in rats: working memory, tolerance, and extinction
    James R Shoblock
    Center for Neuropharmacology and Neuroscience, Albany Medical College, 47 New Scotland Avenue MC 136, Albany, NY 12208, USA
    Psychopharmacology (Berl) 170:150-6. 2003
  3. ncbi request reprint Differential interactions of desipramine with amphetamine and methamphetamine: evidence that amphetamine releases dopamine from noradrenergic neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex
    James R Shoblock
    Center for Neuropharmacology and Neuroscience, Albany Medical College, Albany, New York, USA
    Neurochem Res 29:1437-42. 2004
  4. ncbi request reprint The effect of a systemically active ORL-1 agonist, Ro 64-6198, on the acquisition, expression, extinction, and reinstatement of morphine conditioned place preference
    James R Shoblock
    Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, University of California Los Angeles, 760 Westwood Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90024, USA
    Neuropharmacology 49:439-46. 2005
  5. ncbi request reprint Constitutively active micro opioid receptors mediate the enhanced conditioned aversive effect of naloxone in morphine-dependent mice
    James R Shoblock
    Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Science, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90024, USA
    Neuropsychopharmacology 31:171-7. 2006

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications5

  1. ncbi request reprint Neurochemical and behavioral differences between d-methamphetamine and d-amphetamine in rats
    James R Shoblock
    Center for Neuropharmacology and Neuroscience, Albany Medical College, 47 New Scotland Avenue MC 136, Albany, NY 12208, USA
    Psychopharmacology (Berl) 165:359-69. 2003
    ..Although METH is generally accepted to be more addictive and potent than its analogue AMPH, there are no known neurobiological differences in action between the two drugs that may account for such differences...
  2. ncbi request reprint Differences between d-methamphetamine and d-amphetamine in rats: working memory, tolerance, and extinction
    James R Shoblock
    Center for Neuropharmacology and Neuroscience, Albany Medical College, 47 New Scotland Avenue MC 136, Albany, NY 12208, USA
    Psychopharmacology (Berl) 170:150-6. 2003
    ..Since working memory depends on PFC DA, it was postulated that AMPH would also be more potent than METH at affecting working memory...
  3. ncbi request reprint Differential interactions of desipramine with amphetamine and methamphetamine: evidence that amphetamine releases dopamine from noradrenergic neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex
    James R Shoblock
    Center for Neuropharmacology and Neuroscience, Albany Medical College, Albany, New York, USA
    Neurochem Res 29:1437-42. 2004
    ..It is proposed that amphetamine releases dopamine in the prefrontal cortex primarily through norepinephrine transporters, whereas methamphetamine interacts minimally with norepinephrine transporters...
  4. ncbi request reprint The effect of a systemically active ORL-1 agonist, Ro 64-6198, on the acquisition, expression, extinction, and reinstatement of morphine conditioned place preference
    James R Shoblock
    Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, University of California Los Angeles, 760 Westwood Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90024, USA
    Neuropharmacology 49:439-46. 2005
    ..c.). Ro 64-6198 (1 mg/kg, i.p.), given 15 min prior to the priming injection, blocked reinstatement of morphine CPP. These results suggest that Ro 64-6198's effects may be limited to attenuation of the acute rewarding effects of morphine...
  5. ncbi request reprint Constitutively active micro opioid receptors mediate the enhanced conditioned aversive effect of naloxone in morphine-dependent mice
    James R Shoblock
    Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Science, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90024, USA
    Neuropsychopharmacology 31:171-7. 2006
    ..Such long-term changes in constitutive activity of the mu receptor induced by exogenous opiate exposure may thus be an important factor in hedonic homeostatic dysregulation proposed to underlie the addictive process...