Richard G Wise

Summary

Country: UK

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint The role of fMRI in drug discovery
    Richard G Wise
    Pain Imaging Neuroscience Group, Department of Human Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford, UK
    J Magn Reson Imaging 23:862-76. 2006
  2. doi request reprint Measurement of relative cerebral blood volume using BOLD contrast and mild hypoxic hypoxia
    Richard G Wise
    Department of Clinical Neurology, Centre for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain, John Radcliffe Hospital, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK
    Magn Reson Imaging 28:1129-34. 2010
  3. doi request reprint Coupling of simultaneously acquired electrophysiological and haemodynamic responses during visual stimulation
    Stephen D Mayhew
    Department of Clinical Neurology, Centre for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, UK
    Magn Reson Imaging 28:1066-77. 2010
  4. pmc Evidence for a vascular contribution to diffusion FMRI at high b value
    Karla L Miller
    Centre for Functional MRI of the Brain FMRIB, Oxford Centre for Clinical Magnetic Resonance OCMR, and Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, Oxford, Oxon OX3 9DU, United Kingdom
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:20967-72. 2007
  5. doi request reprint Brainstem functional magnetic resonance imaging: disentangling signal from physiological noise
    Ann K Harvey
    Centre for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain FMRIB, Department of Clinical Neurology, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, UK
    J Magn Reson Imaging 28:1337-44. 2008
  6. doi request reprint A multisensory investigation of the functional significance of the "pain matrix"
    Andre Mouraux
    Centre for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK
    Neuroimage 54:2237-49. 2011
  7. doi request reprint Measuring the effects of remifentanil on cerebral blood flow and arterial arrival time using 3D GRASE MRI with pulsed arterial spin labelling
    Bradley J MacIntosh
    FMRIB Centre, Department of Clinical Neurology, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK
    J Cereb Blood Flow Metab 28:1514-22. 2008
  8. ncbi request reprint Pharmacological FMRI: measuring opioid effects on the BOLD response to hypercapnia
    Kyle T S Pattinson
    Nuffield Department of Anaesthetics, Oxford University, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, UK
    J Cereb Blood Flow Metab 27:414-23. 2007
  9. ncbi request reprint Dynamic forcing of end-tidal carbon dioxide and oxygen applied to functional magnetic resonance imaging
    Richard G Wise
    Centre for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain, Department of Clinical Neurology, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, UK
    J Cereb Blood Flow Metab 27:1521-32. 2007
  10. doi request reprint Determination of the human brainstem respiratory control network and its cortical connections in vivo using functional and structural imaging
    Kyle T S Pattinson
    Nuffield Department of Anaesthetics, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, UK
    Neuroimage 44:295-305. 2009

Detail Information

Publications26

  1. ncbi request reprint The role of fMRI in drug discovery
    Richard G Wise
    Pain Imaging Neuroscience Group, Department of Human Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford, UK
    J Magn Reson Imaging 23:862-76. 2006
    ..In future, pharmacological fMRI is likely to extend to examinations of the spinal cord and into pharmacogenetics to relate genetic polymorphisms to differential responses of the brain to drugs...
  2. doi request reprint Measurement of relative cerebral blood volume using BOLD contrast and mild hypoxic hypoxia
    Richard G Wise
    Department of Clinical Neurology, Centre for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain, John Radcliffe Hospital, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK
    Magn Reson Imaging 28:1129-34. 2010
    ..5 ± 0.2 (mean ± S.D.) for cortical gray matter to white matter and 1.0 ± 0.3 for cortical gray matter to deep gray matter...
  3. doi request reprint Coupling of simultaneously acquired electrophysiological and haemodynamic responses during visual stimulation
    Stephen D Mayhew
    Department of Clinical Neurology, Centre for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, UK
    Magn Reson Imaging 28:1066-77. 2010
    ....
  4. pmc Evidence for a vascular contribution to diffusion FMRI at high b value
    Karla L Miller
    Centre for Functional MRI of the Brain FMRIB, Oxford Centre for Clinical Magnetic Resonance OCMR, and Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, Oxford, Oxon OX3 9DU, United Kingdom
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:20967-72. 2007
    ..These results suggest that a large component of the diffusion FMRI signal at high b value is vascular rather than neuronal...
  5. doi request reprint Brainstem functional magnetic resonance imaging: disentangling signal from physiological noise
    Ann K Harvey
    Centre for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain FMRIB, Department of Clinical Neurology, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, UK
    J Magn Reson Imaging 28:1337-44. 2008
    ..To estimate the importance of respiratory and cardiac effects on signal variability found in functional magnetic resonance imaging data recorded from the brainstem...
  6. doi request reprint A multisensory investigation of the functional significance of the "pain matrix"
    Andre Mouraux
    Centre for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK
    Neuroimage 54:2237-49. 2011
    ..Taken together, these findings suggest that the largest part of the fMRI responses elicited by phasic nociceptive stimuli reflects non nociceptive-specific cognitive processes...
  7. doi request reprint Measuring the effects of remifentanil on cerebral blood flow and arterial arrival time using 3D GRASE MRI with pulsed arterial spin labelling
    Bradley J MacIntosh
    FMRIB Centre, Department of Clinical Neurology, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK
    J Cereb Blood Flow Metab 28:1514-22. 2008
    ..7+/-1.60 %CBF per mm Hg. Significant differences between physiologic conditions were observed in both CBF and AAT maps, indicating that 3D GRASE-ASL has the sensitivity to study changes in physiology at a voxel level...
  8. ncbi request reprint Pharmacological FMRI: measuring opioid effects on the BOLD response to hypercapnia
    Kyle T S Pattinson
    Nuffield Department of Anaesthetics, Oxford University, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, UK
    J Cereb Blood Flow Metab 27:414-23. 2007
    ..We suggest that similar methodology should be used when investigating other potentially vasoactive compounds with FMRI...
  9. ncbi request reprint Dynamic forcing of end-tidal carbon dioxide and oxygen applied to functional magnetic resonance imaging
    Richard G Wise
    Centre for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain, Department of Clinical Neurology, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, UK
    J Cereb Blood Flow Metab 27:1521-32. 2007
    ..The DEF system can provide flexible, convenient, and physiologically well-controlled respiratory challenges in the MRI environment for mapping dynamic responses of the cerebrovasculature...
  10. doi request reprint Determination of the human brainstem respiratory control network and its cortical connections in vivo using functional and structural imaging
    Kyle T S Pattinson
    Nuffield Department of Anaesthetics, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, UK
    Neuroimage 44:295-305. 2009
    ..From these results we speculate that the thalamus plays an important role in integrating respiratory signals to and from the brainstem respiratory centres...
  11. doi request reprint EEG signatures of auditory activity correlate with simultaneously recorded fMRI responses in humans
    Stephen D Mayhew
    Centre for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain, Department of Clinical Neurology, John Radcliffe Hospital, Headington, Oxford, UK
    Neuroimage 49:849-64. 2010
    ....
  12. doi request reprint Regions of interest analysis in pharmacological fMRI: how do the definition criteria influence the inferred result?
    Georgios D Mitsis
    Centre for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain FMRIB, Department of Clinical Neurology, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK
    Neuroimage 40:121-32. 2008
    ..For these reasons, fROIs should be employed with caution when it is not possible to make clear anatomical prior hypotheses...
  13. ncbi request reprint Physiological noise modelling for spinal functional magnetic resonance imaging studies
    Jonathan C W Brooks
    PAIN Group, Department of Physiology Anatomy and Genetics, Le Gros Clark Building, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QX, UK
    Neuroimage 39:680-92. 2008
    ....
  14. pmc Relating brain damage to brain plasticity in patients with multiple sclerosis
    Valentina Tomassini
    Oxford Centre for Functional MRI of the Brain FMRIB, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK
    Neurorehabil Neural Repair 26:581-93. 2012
    ..However, functional impairments can be reduced with practice, suggesting that brain plasticity is preserved even in patients with substantial damage...
  15. ncbi request reprint The anxiolytic effects of midazolam during anticipation to pain revealed using fMRI
    Richard G Wise
    Department of Clinical Neurology, Centre for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain FMRIB, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, OX3 9DU Oxford, UK
    Magn Reson Imaging 25:801-10. 2007
    ..We present a pharmacological functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study in which we investigate the selective modulation by midazolam of brain activity associated with anticipation to pain compared to pain itself...
  16. ncbi request reprint Combining fMRI with a pharmacokinetic model to determine which brain areas activated by painful stimulation are specifically modulated by remifentanil
    Richard G Wise
    Centre for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain, Department of Clinical Neurology, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, OX3 9DU, United Kingdom
    Neuroimage 16:999-1014. 2002
    ..The method of examining time-dependent pharmacological modulation of specific brain activity may be generalized to other drugs that modulate brain activity other than that associated with pain...
  17. ncbi request reprint Using fMRI to quantify the time dependence of remifentanil analgesia in the human brain
    Richard G Wise
    Department of Clinical Neurology, Centre for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, UK
    Neuropsychopharmacology 29:626-35. 2004
    ..Comparison of the time course of regional brain activity with pain perception could reveal those regions engaged in drug-induced analgesia...
  18. doi request reprint The effects of respiratory CO2 fluctuations in the resting-state BOLD signal differ between eyes open and eyes closed
    Tingying Peng
    Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Department of Engineering Science, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK
    Magn Reson Imaging 31:336-45. 2013
    ..The identified dominant Petco2→BOLD directional coupling supports the notion that Petco2 fluctuations are indeed a cause of resting BOLD variance in the majority of subjects...
  19. ncbi request reprint BOLD functional MRI in disease and pharmacological studies: room for improvement?
    G D Iannetti
    Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, OX1 3QX, Oxford, UK
    Magn Reson Imaging 25:978-88. 2007
    ....
  20. ncbi request reprint Cerebral perfusion response to hyperoxia
    Daniel P Bulte
    FMRIB Centre, Department of Clinical Neurology, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK
    J Cereb Blood Flow Metab 27:69-75. 2007
    ....
  21. ncbi request reprint Itch and motivation to scratch: an investigation of the central and peripheral correlates of allergen- and histamine-induced itch in humans
    Siri G Leknes
    Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, South Parks Rd, Oxford OX1 3QX, UK
    J Neurophysiol 97:415-22. 2007
    ..g., addiction and obsessive compulsive disorder. The patterns of itch-induced activation reported here may help explain why chronic itch sufferers frequently self-harm through uncontrollable itch-scratch cycles...
  22. ncbi request reprint Simultaneous measurement of blood and myocardial velocity in the rat heart by phase contrast MRI using sparse q-space sampling
    Richard G Wise
    Department of Human Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK
    J Magn Reson Imaging 22:614-27. 2005
    ..To measure cardiac blood flow patterns and ventricular wall velocities through the cardiac cycle in anesthetized Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats...
  23. ncbi request reprint A comparison of visceral and somatic pain processing in the human brainstem using functional magnetic resonance imaging
    Paul Dunckley
    Department of Human Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3QX, United Kingdom
    J Neurosci 25:7333-41. 2005
    ..05, Pearson's r, two-tailed) but not somatic stimulation. We propose that the differences in NCF and right PAG activation observed may represent a greater nocifensive response and greater emotive salience of visceral over somatic pain...
  24. ncbi request reprint Resting fluctuations in arterial carbon dioxide induce significant low frequency variations in BOLD signal
    Richard G Wise
    Centre for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain, Department of Clinical Neurology, John Radcliffe Hospital, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK
    Neuroimage 21:1652-64. 2004
    ..These fluctuations are a source of physiological noise and a potentially important confounding factor in fMRI paradigms that modify breathing. However, they can also be used for mapping regional vascular responsiveness to CO(2)...
  25. doi request reprint Noninvasive brain imaging for experimental medicine in drug discovery
    Paul M Matthews
    FMRIB Centre, Department of Clinical Neurology, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, OX3 9DU, UK
    Expert Opin Drug Discov 1:111-21. 2006
    ..Imaging methods offer the ultimate promise for the development of clinically predictive surrogate markers of disease responses to new drugs...
  26. ncbi request reprint Imaging how attention modulates pain in humans using functional MRI
    Susanna J Bantick
    Oxford University Department of Clinical Neurology, Centre for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain, John Radcliffe Hospital, Headington, Oxford, UK
    Brain 125:310-9. 2002
    ..In contrast, many areas of the pain matrix (i.e. thalamus, insula, cognitive division of the ACC) displayed reduced activation, supporting the behavioural results of reduced pain perception...