S K S Thorpe

Summary

Affiliation: University of Birmingham
Country: UK

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Origin of human bipedalism as an adaptation for locomotion on flexible branches
    S K S Thorpe
    School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK
    Science 316:1328-31. 2007
  2. pmc Orangutans use compliant branches to lower the energetic cost of locomotion
    S K S Thorpe
    School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B152TT, UK
    Biol Lett 3:253-6. 2007
  3. ncbi request reprint Stresses exerted in the hindlimb muscles of common chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) during bipedal locomotion
    S K S Thorpe
    Department of Human Biology, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa
    Folia Primatol (Basel) 75:253-65. 2004
  4. ncbi request reprint Locomotor ecology of wild orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus abelii) in the Gunung Leuser Ecosystem, Sumatra, Indonesia: a multivariate analysis using log-linear modelling
    Susannah K S Thorpe
    Department of Human Biology, University of Cape Town, Cape Town 7925, South Africa
    Am J Phys Anthropol 127:58-78. 2005
  5. ncbi request reprint Orangutan positional behavior and the nature of arboreal locomotion in Hominoidea
    Susannah K S Thorpe
    School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK
    Am J Phys Anthropol 131:384-401. 2006
  6. pmc Orangutans employ unique strategies to control branch flexibility
    Susannah K S Thorpe
    School of Biosciences and Department of Primary Care and General Practise, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, United Kingdom
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 106:12646-51. 2009
  7. doi request reprint Postural strategies employed by orangutans (Pongo abelii) during feeding in the terminal branch niche
    J P Myatt
    School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK
    Am J Phys Anthropol 146:73-82. 2011
  8. doi request reprint A new method for recording complex positional behaviours and habitat interactions in primates
    J P Myatt
    School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, UK julia myatt gmail com
    Folia Primatol (Basel) 82:13-24. 2011
  9. doi request reprint Testing the use/disuse hypothesis: pectoral and leg muscle changes in captive barnacle geese Branta leucopsis during wing moult
    Steven J Portugal
    Centre for Ornithology, School of Biosciences, The University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK
    J Exp Biol 212:2403-10. 2009
  10. ncbi request reprint Gait parameters in vertical climbing of captive, rehabilitant and wild Sumatran orang-utans (Pongo pygmaeus abelii)
    Karin Isler
    Anthropologisches Institut und Museum, Universitat Zurich Irchel, Winterthurerstr 190, 8057 Zurich, Switzerland
    J Exp Biol 206:4081-96. 2003

Detail Information

Publications11

  1. ncbi request reprint Origin of human bipedalism as an adaptation for locomotion on flexible branches
    S K S Thorpe
    School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK
    Science 316:1328-31. 2007
    ..Human bipedalism is thus less an innovation than an exploitation of a locomotor behavior retained from the common great ape ancestor...
  2. pmc Orangutans use compliant branches to lower the energetic cost of locomotion
    S K S Thorpe
    School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B152TT, UK
    Biol Lett 3:253-6. 2007
    ..This study seems to be the first to show that elastic compliance in arboreal supports can be used to reduce the energetic cost of gap crossing...
  3. ncbi request reprint Stresses exerted in the hindlimb muscles of common chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) during bipedal locomotion
    S K S Thorpe
    Department of Human Biology, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa
    Folia Primatol (Basel) 75:253-65. 2004
    ..During a slow walk, untrained chimpanzees were found to exert far greater muscle stresses than humans do when running at moderate speed, particularly in the muscles that extend the hip, because of the bent-hip, bent-knee posture...
  4. ncbi request reprint Locomotor ecology of wild orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus abelii) in the Gunung Leuser Ecosystem, Sumatra, Indonesia: a multivariate analysis using log-linear modelling
    Susannah K S Thorpe
    Department of Human Biology, University of Cape Town, Cape Town 7925, South Africa
    Am J Phys Anthropol 127:58-78. 2005
    ..Effects are primarily related to a tendency for adult, parous females to adopt a more cautious approach to locomotion than adult males and immature subjects...
  5. ncbi request reprint Orangutan positional behavior and the nature of arboreal locomotion in Hominoidea
    Susannah K S Thorpe
    School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK
    Am J Phys Anthropol 131:384-401. 2006
    ..This study suggests that it is orthogrady in general, rather than forelimb suspend specifically, that characterizes the positional behavior of hominoids...
  6. pmc Orangutans employ unique strategies to control branch flexibility
    Susannah K S Thorpe
    School of Biosciences and Department of Primary Care and General Practise, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, United Kingdom
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 106:12646-51. 2009
    ..These results have implications for understanding locomotor diversity in fossil and extant apes and for orangutan conservation and reintroduction programs...
  7. doi request reprint Postural strategies employed by orangutans (Pongo abelii) during feeding in the terminal branch niche
    J P Myatt
    School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK
    Am J Phys Anthropol 146:73-82. 2011
    ..Feeding method differed between the age-sex classes in relation to support stiffness, with larger adult males taking fewer risks due to their larger size, compared to infants and juveniles...
  8. doi request reprint A new method for recording complex positional behaviours and habitat interactions in primates
    J P Myatt
    School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, UK julia myatt gmail com
    Folia Primatol (Basel) 82:13-24. 2011
    ..This will facilitate our understanding of how behaviours vary in response to the environment, and the capabilities of primates to perform key tasks in their distinct niches...
  9. doi request reprint Testing the use/disuse hypothesis: pectoral and leg muscle changes in captive barnacle geese Branta leucopsis during wing moult
    Steven J Portugal
    Centre for Ornithology, School of Biosciences, The University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK
    J Exp Biol 212:2403-10. 2009
    ..Instead, changes seem to be compensatory or to occur in anticipation of changes in locomotor patterns...
  10. ncbi request reprint Gait parameters in vertical climbing of captive, rehabilitant and wild Sumatran orang-utans (Pongo pygmaeus abelii)
    Karin Isler
    Anthropologisches Institut und Museum, Universitat Zurich Irchel, Winterthurerstr 190, 8057 Zurich, Switzerland
    J Exp Biol 206:4081-96. 2003
    ..In comparison with other primates, orang-utans exhibit a longer cycle duration, longer strides but lower climbing speed, reflecting a compromise between the demands of a large body mass and extreme joint mobility...
  11. pmc Inertial properties of hominoid limb segments
    Karin Isler
    University of Zurich Irchel, Zurich, Switzerland
    J Anat 209:201-18. 2006
    ..Common chimpanzees may have secondarily evolved a more efficient quadrupedal gait...