S Telfer

Summary

Affiliation: University of Liverpool
Country: UK

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Parentage assignment detects frequent and large-scale dispersal in water voles
    S Telfer
    Aberdeen Population Ecology Research Unit APERU, Department of Zoology, University of Aberdeen, Tillydrone Avenue, Aberdeen, AB24 2TZ, UK
    Mol Ecol 12:1939-49. 2003
  2. ncbi request reprint Ecological differences and coexistence in a guild of microparasites: Bartonella in wild rodents
    Sandra Telfer
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Liverpool, L69 7ZB United Kingdom
    Ecology 88:1841-9. 2007
  3. ncbi request reprint The dynamics of murid gammaherpesvirus 4 within wild, sympatric populations of bank voles and wood mice
    Sandra Telfer
    School of Biological Sciences, The University of Liverpool, Biosciences Building, Crown Street, Liverpool, L69 7ZB, UK
    J Wildl Dis 43:32-9. 2007
  4. pmc Contrasting dynamics of Bartonella spp. in cyclic field vole populations: the impact of vector and host dynamics
    S Telfer
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Liverpool, Biosciences Building, Liverpool L69 7LB, UK
    Parasitology 134:413-25. 2007
  5. pmc Parasite interactions in natural populations: insights from longitudinal data
    S Telfer
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Liverpool, Biosciences Building, Liverpool L69 7LB, UK
    Parasitology 135:767-81. 2008
  6. ncbi request reprint Disruption of a host-parasite system following the introduction of an exotic host species
    S Telfer
    Department of Veterinary Pathology, School of Biological Sciences, The University of Liverpool, Biosciences Building, Liverpool L69 7LB, UK
    Parasitology 130:661-8. 2005
  7. ncbi request reprint A role for vector-independent transmission in rodent trypanosome infection?
    A Smith
    Population Biology Research Group, School of Biological Sciences, Bioscience Building, University of Liverpool, Merseyside L69 7ZB, UK
    Int J Parasitol 36:1359-66. 2006
  8. pmc Relative importance of Ixodes ricinus and Ixodes trianguliceps as vectors for Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Babesia microti in field vole (Microtus agrestis) populations
    K J Bown
    Department of Veterinary Pathology, University of Liverpool, Neston, Cheshire, United Kingdom
    Appl Environ Microbiol 74:7118-25. 2008
  9. pmc Tuberculosis (Mycobacterium microti) in wild field vole populations
    S Burthe
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Liverpool, Crown Street, Liverpool L69 7ZB, UK
    Parasitology 135:309-17. 2008
  10. ncbi request reprint Sympatric Ixodes trianguliceps and Ixodes ricinus ticks feeding on field voles (Microtus agrestis): potential for increased risk of Anaplasma phagocytophilum in the United Kingdom?
    K J Bown
    Department of Veterinary Pathology, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK
    Vector Borne Zoonotic Dis 6:404-10. 2006

Detail Information

Publications24

  1. ncbi request reprint Parentage assignment detects frequent and large-scale dispersal in water voles
    S Telfer
    Aberdeen Population Ecology Research Unit APERU, Department of Zoology, University of Aberdeen, Tillydrone Avenue, Aberdeen, AB24 2TZ, UK
    Mol Ecol 12:1939-49. 2003
    ..Information from genotyping increased the estimated rate and scale of dispersal by three- and twofold, respectively, and hence represents a powerful tool to provide more realistic estimates of dispersal parameters...
  2. ncbi request reprint Ecological differences and coexistence in a guild of microparasites: Bartonella in wild rodents
    Sandra Telfer
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Liverpool, L69 7ZB United Kingdom
    Ecology 88:1841-9. 2007
    ..taylorii in wood mice density dependence was delayed. B. birtlesii prevalence in wood mice was related to bank vole density. The implications of these differences for species coexistence are discussed...
  3. ncbi request reprint The dynamics of murid gammaherpesvirus 4 within wild, sympatric populations of bank voles and wood mice
    Sandra Telfer
    School of Biological Sciences, The University of Liverpool, Biosciences Building, Crown Street, Liverpool, L69 7ZB, UK
    J Wildl Dis 43:32-9. 2007
    ..This may reflect individual variation in susceptibility, potentially related to variability in the ability to mount an effective immune response...
  4. pmc Contrasting dynamics of Bartonella spp. in cyclic field vole populations: the impact of vector and host dynamics
    S Telfer
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Liverpool, Biosciences Building, Liverpool L69 7LB, UK
    Parasitology 134:413-25. 2007
    ..possibly reflecting the importance of flea exchange between hosts. However, even closely related species showed quite different dynamics, emphasising that other factors such as population age structure can impact on zoonotic risk...
  5. pmc Parasite interactions in natural populations: insights from longitudinal data
    S Telfer
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Liverpool, Biosciences Building, Liverpool L69 7LB, UK
    Parasitology 135:767-81. 2008
    ....
  6. ncbi request reprint Disruption of a host-parasite system following the introduction of an exotic host species
    S Telfer
    Department of Veterinary Pathology, School of Biological Sciences, The University of Liverpool, Biosciences Building, Liverpool L69 7LB, UK
    Parasitology 130:661-8. 2005
    ..In addition we found a negative relationship between B. birtlesii and B. taylorii prevalences, indicating that these two microparasites may compete within hosts...
  7. ncbi request reprint A role for vector-independent transmission in rodent trypanosome infection?
    A Smith
    Population Biology Research Group, School of Biological Sciences, Bioscience Building, University of Liverpool, Merseyside L69 7ZB, UK
    Int J Parasitol 36:1359-66. 2006
    ..The possibility that the importance of such transmission routes may have been underestimated in 'vector-borne' infections more generally is discussed...
  8. pmc Relative importance of Ixodes ricinus and Ixodes trianguliceps as vectors for Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Babesia microti in field vole (Microtus agrestis) populations
    K J Bown
    Department of Veterinary Pathology, University of Liverpool, Neston, Cheshire, United Kingdom
    Appl Environ Microbiol 74:7118-25. 2008
    ..This study provides compelling evidence for the importance of I. trianguliceps in maintaining these enzootic tick-borne infections, while highlighting the potential for such infections to escape into alternative hosts via I. ricinus...
  9. pmc Tuberculosis (Mycobacterium microti) in wild field vole populations
    S Burthe
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Liverpool, Crown Street, Liverpool L69 7ZB, UK
    Parasitology 135:309-17. 2008
    ..Although predicted survival following the appearance of a cutaneous lesion was lower than for uninfected individuals, this was not significant...
  10. ncbi request reprint Sympatric Ixodes trianguliceps and Ixodes ricinus ticks feeding on field voles (Microtus agrestis): potential for increased risk of Anaplasma phagocytophilum in the United Kingdom?
    K J Bown
    Department of Veterinary Pathology, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK
    Vector Borne Zoonotic Dis 6:404-10. 2006
    ..trianguliceps, which may alone maintain endemic cycles, and exophilic I. ricinus ticks, which could act as a bridge vector and transmit infections to humans and domesticated animals...
  11. ncbi request reprint Widespread gene flow and high genetic variability in populations of water voles Arvicola terrestris in patchy habitats
    J Aars
    NERC Molecular Genetics in Ecological Initiative, School of Biological Science, Aberdeen, Scotland, UK
    Mol Ecol 15:1455-66. 2006
    ....
  12. ncbi request reprint Trypanosomes, fleas and field voles: ecological dynamics of a host-vector--parasite interaction
    A Smith
    Population Biology Research Group, School of Biological Sciences, Biosciences Building, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZB, UK
    Parasitology 131:355-65. 2005
    ..An interaction between age and whether the individual was new or recaptured suggested that infected animals are less likely to become territory holders than their uninfected counterparts...
  13. pmc Host condition and individual risk of cowpox virus infection in natural animal populations: cause or effect?
    P M Beldomenico
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Liverpool, UK
    Epidemiol Infect 137:1295-301. 2009
    ..We discuss the care needed when interpreting the findings of wildlife disease studies...
  14. pmc Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) heterozygote superiority to natural multi-parasite infections in the water vole (Arvicola terrestris)
    M K Oliver
    Institute of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Zoology Building, Aberdeen AB24 2TZ, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 276:1119-28. 2009
    ..This is the first demonstration of MHC heterozygote superiority against multiple parasites in a natural population, a mechanism that could help maintain high levels of functional MHC genetic diversity in natural populations...
  15. ncbi request reprint Cowpox virus infection in natural field vole Microtus agrestis populations: delayed density dependence and individual risk
    Sarah Burthe
    Population and Evolutionary Biology Research Group, School of Biological Sciences, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK
    J Anim Ecol 75:1416-25. 2006
    ..6. Hence, these analyses confirm that there is a delayed numerical response of cowpox infection to vole density, supporting the hypothesis that endemic pathogens may play some part in shaping vole cycles...
  16. pmc Seasonal host dynamics drive the timing of recurrent epidemics in a wildlife population
    Michael Begon
    School of Biological Sciences, The University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZB, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 276:1603-10. 2009
    ..Model results emphasize the importance of the interplay between seasonal infection and recruitment and suggest that our empirical patterns have a relevance extending beyond our own system...
  17. pmc Species interactions in a parasite community drive infection risk in a wildlife population
    Sandra Telfer
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Liverpool, Crown Street, Liverpool L69 7ZB, UK
    Science 330:243-6. 2010
    ..We highlight the danger of mistaken inference when considering parasite species in isolation rather than parasite communities...
  18. pmc Inference of cowpox virus transmission rates between wild rodent host classes using space-time interaction
    David Carslake
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Liverpool, L69 7ZB, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 273:775-82. 2006
    ..The suggestion of different modes of transmission in the two species is itself consistent with the apparent absence of transmission between species...
  19. pmc Cowpox virus infection in natural field vole Microtus agrestis populations: significant negative impacts on survival
    Sarah Burthe
    Department of Veterinary Pathology, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK
    J Anim Ecol 77:110-9. 2008
    ..6. This negative correlation between cowpox virus infection and field vole survival, with its potentially significant effect on population growth rate, is the first for an endemic pathogen in a cyclic population of wild rodents...
  20. pmc Poor condition and infection: a vicious circle in natural populations
    Pablo M Beldomenico
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Liverpool, Crown Street, Liverpool L69 7ZB, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 275:1753-9. 2008
    ....
  21. pmc The dynamics of health in wild field vole populations: a haematological perspective
    Pablo M Beldomenico
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Liverpool, UK
    J Anim Ecol 77:984-97. 2008
    ..6. Breeding early in the year was most likely in females in better condition (high lymphocyte and red blood cell counts). 7. All the haematological parameters were affected adversely by high population densities...
  22. pmc Azurocytes in wild field voles: factors associated with their occurrence
    Pablo M Beldomenico
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Liverpool, Crown Street, Liverpool L69 7ZB, UK
    Ecohealth 5:317-27. 2008
    ..Hence, overall our results suggest that, in females, these cells may be important for reproduction and may have a role in inducing abortion when conditions are not favorable, while in males they might be a response to infection...
  23. ncbi request reprint Phylogeographic structure and postglacial evolutionary history of water voles (Arvicola terrestris) in the United Kingdom
    Stuart B Piertney
    NERC Molecular Genetics in Ecology Initiative, School of Biological Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen AB24 2TZ, UK
    Mol Ecol 14:1435-44. 2005
    ..The implications of both phylogeographical and population genetic structure are discussed in context with the conservation of water voles in Britain...
  24. pmc Disease effects on reproduction can cause population cycles in seasonal environments
    Matthew J Smith
    Department of Mathematics and the Maxwell Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Heriot Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS, UK
    J Anim Ecol 77:378-89. 2008
    ..When the model predicts quasi-periodic multiyear cycles it also predicts that seroprevalence and the effective date of onset of the reproductive season are delayed density-dependent, two phenomena that have been recorded in the field...