Nicholas J Talbot

Summary

Affiliation: University of Exeter
Country: UK

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint On the trail of a cereal killer: Exploring the biology of Magnaporthe grisea
    Nicholas J Talbot
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Exeter, Washington Singer Laboratories, Perry Road, Exeter EX4 4QG, United Kingdom
    Annu Rev Microbiol 57:177-202. 2003
  2. ncbi request reprint Functional analysis of lipid metabolism in Magnaporthe grisea reveals a requirement for peroxisomal fatty acid beta-oxidation during appressorium-mediated plant infection
    Zheng Yi Wang
    School of Biosciences, University of Exeter, Washington Singer Laboratories, Perry Road, Exeter, EX4 4QG, UK
    Mol Plant Microbe Interact 20:475-91. 2007
  3. ncbi request reprint Peroxisomal carnitine acetyl transferase is required for elaboration of penetration hyphae during plant infection by Magnaporthe grisea
    Gurpreet K Bhambra
    School of Biosciences, University of Exeter, Washington Singer Laboratories, Perry Road, Exeter, EX4 4QG, UK
    Mol Microbiol 61:46-60. 2006
  4. pmc Infection-associated nuclear degeneration in the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae requires non-selective macro-autophagy
    Min He
    School of Biosciences, University of Exeter, Exeter, Devon, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 7:e33270. 2012
  5. pmc A fungal metallothionein is required for pathogenicity of Magnaporthe grisea
    Sara L Tucker
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Exeter, Washington Singer Laboratories, Exeter EX4 4QG, United Kingdom
    Plant Cell 16:1575-88. 2004
  6. ncbi request reprint Four conserved intramolecular disulphide linkages are required for secretion and cell wall localization of a hydrophobin during fungal morphogenesis
    Michael J Kershaw
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Exeter, Washington Singer Laboratories, Perry Road, Exeter EX4 4QG, UK
    Mol Microbiol 56:117-25. 2005
  7. pmc Glycogen metabolic genes are involved in trehalose-6-phosphate synthase-mediated regulation of pathogenicity by the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae
    Muhammad Badaruddin
    School of Biosciences, University of Exeter, Geoffrey Pope Building, Exeter, Devon, United Kingdom
    PLoS Pathog 9:e1003604. 2013
  8. pmc NADPH oxidases regulate septin-mediated cytoskeletal remodeling during plant infection by the rice blast fungus
    Lauren S Ryder
    School of Biosciences, University of Exeter, Exeter EX4 4QD, United Kingdom
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 110:3179-84. 2013
  9. pmc Genome-wide functional analysis reveals that infection-associated fungal autophagy is necessary for rice blast disease
    Michael J Kershaw
    School of Biosciences, University of Exeter, Geoffrey Pope Building, Stocker Road, Exeter EX4 4QD, United Kingdom
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 106:15967-72. 2009
  10. ncbi request reprint The glyoxylate cycle is required for temporal regulation of virulence by the plant pathogenic fungus Magnaporthe grisea
    Zheng Yi Wang
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Exeter, Washington Singer Laboratories, Exeter EX4 4QG, UK
    Mol Microbiol 47:1601-12. 2003

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications49

  1. ncbi request reprint On the trail of a cereal killer: Exploring the biology of Magnaporthe grisea
    Nicholas J Talbot
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Exeter, Washington Singer Laboratories, Perry Road, Exeter EX4 4QG, United Kingdom
    Annu Rev Microbiol 57:177-202. 2003
    ..Finally, the likely mechanisms that promote genetic diversity in M. grisea and our current understanding of the population structure of the blast fungus are evaluated...
  2. ncbi request reprint Functional analysis of lipid metabolism in Magnaporthe grisea reveals a requirement for peroxisomal fatty acid beta-oxidation during appressorium-mediated plant infection
    Zheng Yi Wang
    School of Biosciences, University of Exeter, Washington Singer Laboratories, Perry Road, Exeter, EX4 4QG, UK
    Mol Plant Microbe Interact 20:475-91. 2007
    ..grisea to complete its prepenetration phase of development and enter the host plant...
  3. ncbi request reprint Peroxisomal carnitine acetyl transferase is required for elaboration of penetration hyphae during plant infection by Magnaporthe grisea
    Gurpreet K Bhambra
    School of Biosciences, University of Exeter, Washington Singer Laboratories, Perry Road, Exeter, EX4 4QG, UK
    Mol Microbiol 61:46-60. 2006
    ..Taken together, our findings provide evidence that Pth2 plays a role in the generation of acetyl CoA pools necessary for appressorium function and rapid elaboration of penetration hyphae during host infection...
  4. pmc Infection-associated nuclear degeneration in the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae requires non-selective macro-autophagy
    Min He
    School of Biosciences, University of Exeter, Exeter, Devon, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 7:e33270. 2012
    ..Nuclear degeneration in the spore is known to be essential for plant infection, but the precise mechanism by which it occurs is not known...
  5. pmc A fungal metallothionein is required for pathogenicity of Magnaporthe grisea
    Sara L Tucker
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Exeter, Washington Singer Laboratories, Exeter EX4 4QG, United Kingdom
    Plant Cell 16:1575-88. 2004
    ..Mmt1 appears to be distributed in the inner side of the cell wall of the fungus. These findings indicate that Mmt1-like metallothioneins may play a novel role in fungal cell wall biochemistry that is required for fungal virulence...
  6. ncbi request reprint Four conserved intramolecular disulphide linkages are required for secretion and cell wall localization of a hydrophobin during fungal morphogenesis
    Michael J Kershaw
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Exeter, Washington Singer Laboratories, Perry Road, Exeter EX4 4QG, UK
    Mol Microbiol 56:117-25. 2005
    ..This provides the first genetic evidence that disulphide bridges in a hydrophobin are dispensable for aggregation, but essential for secretion...
  7. pmc Glycogen metabolic genes are involved in trehalose-6-phosphate synthase-mediated regulation of pathogenicity by the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae
    Muhammad Badaruddin
    School of Biosciences, University of Exeter, Geoffrey Pope Building, Exeter, Devon, United Kingdom
    PLoS Pathog 9:e1003604. 2013
    ..oryzae. ..
  8. pmc NADPH oxidases regulate septin-mediated cytoskeletal remodeling during plant infection by the rice blast fungus
    Lauren S Ryder
    School of Biosciences, University of Exeter, Exeter EX4 4QD, United Kingdom
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 110:3179-84. 2013
    ....
  9. pmc Genome-wide functional analysis reveals that infection-associated fungal autophagy is necessary for rice blast disease
    Michael J Kershaw
    School of Biosciences, University of Exeter, Geoffrey Pope Building, Stocker Road, Exeter EX4 4QD, United Kingdom
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 106:15967-72. 2009
    ..A genome-wide analysis therefore demonstrates the importance of infection-associated, nonselective autophagy for the establishment of rice blast disease...
  10. ncbi request reprint The glyoxylate cycle is required for temporal regulation of virulence by the plant pathogenic fungus Magnaporthe grisea
    Zheng Yi Wang
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Exeter, Washington Singer Laboratories, Exeter EX4 4QG, UK
    Mol Microbiol 47:1601-12. 2003
    ..Our results indicate that the glyoxylate cycle is also important in this plant pathogenic fungus, demonstrating the widespread utility of the pathway in microbial pathogenesis...
  11. ncbi request reprint Autophagic fungal cell death is necessary for infection by the rice blast fungus
    Claire Veneault-Fourrey
    School of Biosciences, University of Exeter, Washington Singer Laboratories, Perry Road, Exeter EX4 4QG, UK
    Science 312:580-3. 2006
    ..Impairment of autophagy, by the targeted mutation of the MgATG8 gene, arrested conidial cell death but rendered the fungus nonpathogenic. Thus, the initiation of rice blast requires autophagic cell death of the conidium...
  12. pmc Spatial uncoupling of mitosis and cytokinesis during appressorium-mediated plant infection by the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae
    Diane G O Saunders
    School of Biosciences, University of Exeter, Exeter EX4 4QD, United Kingdom
    Plant Cell 22:2417-28. 2010
    ..oryzae and demonstrate that differentiation of appressoria requires a cytokinetic event that is distinct from cell divisions within hyphae...
  13. pmc Horizontal gene transfer facilitated the evolution of plant parasitic mechanisms in the oomycetes
    Thomas A Richards
    Biosciences, University of Exeter, Exeter EX4 4QD, United Kingdom
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108:15258-63. 2011
    ..These data are consistent with the hypothesis that some oomycetes became successful plant parasites by multiple acquisitions of genes from fungi...
  14. ncbi request reprint Moving toward a systems biology approach to the study of fungal pathogenesis in the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe grisea
    Claire Veneault-Fourrey
    School of Biological Sciences, Washington Singer Laboratories, University of Exeter, Exeter EX4 4QG, United Kingdom
    Adv Appl Microbiol 57:177-215. 2005
  15. pmc Phylogenomic analysis demonstrates a pattern of rare and ancient horizontal gene transfer between plants and fungi
    Thomas A Richards
    Centre for Eukaryotic Evolutionary Microbiology, School of Biosciences, University of Exeter, Exeter, EX4 4QD, United Kingdom
    Plant Cell 21:1897-911. 2009
    ..Our study suggests that genetic exchange between plants and fungi is exceedingly rare, particularly among the angiosperms, but has occurred during their evolutionary history and added important metabolic traits to plant lineages...
  16. ncbi request reprint Evolution of filamentous plant pathogens: gene exchange across eukaryotic kingdoms
    Thomas A Richards
    School of Biosciences, University of Exeter, Geoffrey Pope Building, Exeter EX4 4QD, United Kingdom
    Curr Biol 16:1857-64. 2006
    ....
  17. pmc An NADPH-dependent genetic switch regulates plant infection by the rice blast fungus
    Richard A Wilson
    School of Biosciences, University of Exeter, Exeter EX4 4QD, United Kingdom
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107:21902-7. 2010
    ..oryzae requires a regulatory mechanism involving an NADPH sensor protein, Tps1, a set of NADP-dependent transcriptional corepressors, and the nonconsuming interconversion of NADPH and NADP acting as signal transducer...
  18. pmc Genome-wide transcriptional profiling of appressorium development by the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae
    Darren M Soanes
    College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter, Exeter, United Kingdom
    PLoS Pathog 8:e1002514. 2012
    ....
  19. ncbi request reprint A P-type ATPase required for rice blast disease and induction of host resistance
    Martin J Gilbert
    School of Biosciences, University of Exeter, Washington Singer Laboratories, Perry Road, Exeter EX4 4QG, UK
    Nature 440:535-9. 2006
    ....
  20. pmc Trehalose synthesis and metabolism are required at different stages of plant infection by Magnaporthe grisea
    Andrew J Foster
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Exeter, Washington Singer Laboratories, Perry Road, Exeter EX4 4QG, UK
    EMBO J 22:225-35. 2003
    ..grisea, while trehalose degradation is important for efficient development of the fungus in plant tissue following initial infection...
  21. ncbi request reprint Regulation of the MPG1 hydrophobin gene in the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe grisea
    Darren M Soanes
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Exeter, Washington Singer Laboratories, Perry Road, Exeter, EX4 4QG, UK
    Mol Plant Microbe Interact 15:1253-67. 2002
    ....
  22. doi request reprint Genomes, free radicals and plant cell invasion: recent developments in plant pathogenic fungi
    Martin J Egan
    School of Biosciences, University of Exeter, Geoffrey Pope Building, Stocker Road, Exeter EX4 4QD, United Kingdom
    Curr Opin Plant Biol 11:367-72. 2008
    ..The nature of biotrophic proliferation of fungal pathogens in host tissue has recently revealed new potential mechanisms for cell-to-cell movement by invading pathogens...
  23. doi request reprint Under pressure: investigating the biology of plant infection by Magnaporthe oryzae
    Richard A Wilson
    School of Biosciences, University of Exeter, Geoffrey Pope Building, Stocker Road, Exeter, United Kingdom
    Nat Rev Microbiol 7:185-95. 2009
    ..oryzae. We also look ahead to the key questions that need to be addressed to provide a better understanding of the molecular processes that lead to plant disease and the prospects for sustainable control of rice blast...
  24. ncbi request reprint Use of a substrate/alliinase combination to generate antifungal activity in situ
    Fiona H Fry
    School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, University of Exeter, Stocker Road, Exeter, Devon EX4 4QD, United Kingdom
    J Agric Food Chem 53:574-80. 2005
    ..Importantly, alliinase is also able to use different substrates, therefore paving the way to a range of novel, binary antimicrobial systems with custom-made chemical and biochemical properties...
  25. ncbi request reprint Cellular differentiation and host invasion by the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe grisea
    Zaira Caracuel-Rios
    School of Biosciences, University of Exeter, Geoffrey Pope Building, Stocker Road, Exeter EX4 4QD, United Kingdom
    Curr Opin Microbiol 10:339-45. 2007
    ..Large-scale insertional mutagenesis is now allowing the rapid analysis of gene function in M. grisea, heralding a new approach to the study of this important fungal pathogen...
  26. pmc Generation of reactive oxygen species by fungal NADPH oxidases is required for rice blast disease
    Martin J Egan
    School of Biosciences, Washington Singer Laboratories, University of Exeter, Perry Road, Exeter EX4 4QG, United Kingdom
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:11772-7. 2007
    ..The initiation of rice blast disease therefore requires production of superoxide by the invading pathogen...
  27. pmc Effector-mediated suppression of chitin-triggered immunity by magnaporthe oryzae is necessary for rice blast disease
    Thomas A Mentlak
    School of Biosciences, University of Exeter, Geoffrey Pope Building, Exeter EX4 4QD, United Kingdom
    Plant Cell 24:322-35. 2012
    ..oryzae to cause rice blast disease in the absence of Slp1. We propose that Slp1 sequesters chitin oligosaccharides to prevent PAMP-triggered immunity in rice, thereby facilitating rapid spread of the fungus within host tissue...
  28. ncbi request reprint Genomics of phytopathogenic fungi and the development of bioinformatic resources
    Darren M Soanes
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Exeter, Washington Singer Laboratories, UK
    Mol Plant Microbe Interact 15:421-7. 2002
    ..New querying functions and large sequence sets from a variety of phytopathogenic species will be incorporated in due course...
  29. pmc Comparative genome analysis reveals an absence of leucine-rich repeat pattern-recognition receptor proteins in the kingdom Fungi
    Darren M Soanes
    School of Biosciences, University of Exeter, Exeter, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 5:e12725. 2010
    ..Recognition of microbes by these receptors induces defence responses that protect hosts against potential microbial attack...
  30. doi request reprint The emerging role of autophagy in plant pathogen attack and host defence
    Nicholas J Talbot
    School of Biosciences, University of Exeter, Exeter, United Kingdom
    Curr Opin Plant Biol 12:444-50. 2009
    ....
  31. pmc Comparative genome analysis of filamentous fungi reveals gene family expansions associated with fungal pathogenesis
    Darren M Soanes
    School of Biosciences, Geoffrey Pope Building, University of Exeter, Exeter, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 3:e2300. 2008
    ..The results demonstrate the potential of comparative genome analysis for exploring the evolution of eukaryotic microbial pathogenesis...
  32. pmc Cell cycle-mediated regulation of plant infection by the rice blast fungus
    Diane G O Saunders
    School of Biosciences, University of Exeter, Exeter EX4 4QD, United Kingdom
    Plant Cell 22:497-507. 2010
    ..When considered together, these data suggest that appressorium-mediated plant infection is coordinated by three distinct cell cycle checkpoints that are necessary for establishment of plant disease...
  33. ncbi request reprint Let there be blight: functional analysis of virulence in Phytophthora infestans
    Nicholas J Talbot
    School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, University of Exeter, Washington Singer Laboratories, Perry Road, Exeter EX4 4QG, UK
    Mol Microbiol 51:913-5. 2004
  34. ncbi request reprint The influence of genotypic variation on metabolite diversity in populations of two endophytic fungal species
    Fabian A Seymour
    School of Biological Sciences, Washington Singer Laboratories, Perry Road, University of Exeter, EX4 4QG, UK
    Fungal Genet Biol 41:721-34. 2004
    ..This sub-set of fungal isolates produced greater numbers of unique metabolites than those selected indiscriminately...
  35. pmc A Magnaporthe grisea cyclophilin acts as a virulence determinant during plant infection
    Muriel C Viaud
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Exeter, Washington Singer Laboratories, Perry Road, Exeter EX4 4QG, United Kingdom
    Plant Cell 14:917-30. 2002
    ..These data implicate cyclophilins as virulence factors in phytopathogenic fungi and also provide evidence that calcineurin signaling is required for infection structure formation by Magnaporthe...
  36. ncbi request reprint Production of a monoclonal antibody specific to the genus Trichoderma and closely related fungi, and its use to detect Trichoderma spp. in naturally infested composts
    Christopher R Thornton
    Washington Singer Laboratories, School of Biological Sciences, University of Exeter, Perry Road, Exeter, Devon EX4 4QG, UK
    Microbiology 148:1263-79. 2002
    ..in naturally infested composts. The specificity of this technique was confirmed by phylogenetic analysis based on sequences of the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 rRNA-encoding regions of the isolates...
  37. ncbi request reprint Autophagic cell death and its importance for fungal developmental biology and pathogenesis
    Claire Veneault-Fourrey
    University of Exeter, School of Biosciences, Exeter, UK
    Autophagy 3:126-7. 2007
    ..Significantly, this form of cell death is a prerequisite for plant infection and fungal pathogenesis and part of a growing body of evidence implicating autophagy as a key process in fungal developmental biology...
  38. ncbi request reprint The genome sequence of the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe grisea
    Ralph A Dean
    Center for Integrated Fungal Research, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695, USA
    Nature 434:980-6. 2005
    ..The M. grisea genome has been subject to invasion and proliferation of active transposable elements, reflecting the clonal nature of this fungus imposed by widespread rice cultivation...
  39. doi request reprint Silencing the crowd: high-throughput functional genomics in Magnaporthe oryzae
    Zaira Caracuel-Rios
    School of Biosciences, University of Exeter, Geoffrey Pope Building, Stocker Road, Exeter, EX4 4QD, UK
    Mol Microbiol 68:1341-4. 2008
    ....
  40. ncbi request reprint Fungal genomics goes industrial
    Nicholas J Talbot
    Nat Biotechnol 25:542-3. 2007
  41. ncbi request reprint Independent genetic mechanisms mediate turgor generation and penetration peg formation during plant infection in the rice blast fungus
    Gyungsoon Park
    Department of Botany and Plant Pathology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA
    Mol Microbiol 53:1695-707. 2004
    ..MST12 may play important roles in regulating penetration peg formation and directing the physical forces exerted by the appressorium turgor in mature appressoria...
  42. ncbi request reprint Genomics of parasitic and symbiotic fungi
    Anders Tunlid
    Department of Microbial Ecology, Lund University, Ecology Building, SE 223 62 Lund, Sweden
    Curr Opin Microbiol 5:513-9. 2002
    ..Comparative analyses of these sequences will provide new insights into the genomic plasticity and evolution of parasitism and mutualism in fungi...
  43. pmc Tps1 regulates the pentose phosphate pathway, nitrogen metabolism and fungal virulence
    Richard A Wilson
    School of Biosciences, University of Exeter, Exeter, UK
    EMBO J 26:3673-85. 2007
    ..Taken together, these results demonstrate that Tps1 is a central regulator for integration of carbon and nitrogen metabolism, and plays a pivotal role in the establishment of plant disease...
  44. ncbi request reprint Plant pathology: deadly special deliveries
    Nicholas J Talbot
    Nature 450:41-3. 2007
  45. pmc Insights from sequencing fungal and oomycete genomes: what can we learn about plant disease and the evolution of pathogenicity?
    Darren M Soanes
    School of Biosciences, University of Exeter, Exeter EX4 4QD, UK
    Plant Cell 19:3318-26. 2007
  46. pmc Comparative genome analysis across a kingdom of eukaryotic organisms: specialization and diversification in the fungi
    Michael J Cornell
    School of Computer Science, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL, United Kingdom
    Genome Res 17:1809-22. 2007
    ..These analyses have been collated in the e-Fungi data warehouse, providing an online resource for comparative genomic analysis of the fungi...
  47. ncbi request reprint Stage-specific cellular localisation of two hydrophobins during plant infection by the pathogenic fungus Cladosporium fulvum
    James R Whiteford
    Department of Biological Sciences, Imperial College London, Sir Alexander Fleming Building, Imperial College Road, SW7 2AZ London, UK
    Fungal Genet Biol 41:624-34. 2004
    ..This was not supported by the phenotypic analysis of DeltaHCf-6 strains. Hydrophobins may play distinct roles due to precisely regulated spatial localisation during infection-related development of C. fulvum...
  48. ncbi request reprint Immunofluorescence microscopy and immunogold EM for investigating fungal infection of plants
    Christopher R Thornton
    School of Biosciences, University of Exeter, Geoffrey Pope Building, Stocker Road, Exeter EX4 4QD, UK
    Nat Protoc 1:2506-11. 2006
    ..Results from the IF and IES procedures can be obtained within 4-5 h. Sample preparation for IEM takes approximately 4 days. Gold labeling and visualization of samples can be completed within 4 h...
  49. pmc e-Fungi: a data resource for comparative analysis of fungal genomes
    Cornelia Hedeler
    School of Computer Science, The University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL, UK
    BMC Genomics 8:426. 2007
    ..Furthermore, comparative analyses benefit from close integration of derived data sets that cluster genes or organisms in a way that eases the expression of requests that clarify points of similarity or difference between species...