P G Stevenson

Summary

Affiliation: University of Cambridge
Country: UK

Publications

  1. pmc Herpes simplex virus 1 targets the murine olfactory neuroepithelium for host entry
    Maitreyi Shivkumar
    Division of Virology, Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge, Addenbrookes Hospital, Cambridge, United Kingdom
    J Virol 87:10477-88. 2013
  2. pmc In vivo imaging of murid herpesvirus-4 infection
    Ricardo Milho
    Division of Virology, Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge, UK
    J Gen Virol 90:21-32. 2009
  3. pmc In vivo importance of heparan sulfate-binding glycoproteins for murid herpesvirus-4 infection
    Laurent Gillet
    Division of Virology, Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge, UK
    J Gen Virol 90:602-13. 2009
  4. pmc Glycoprotein L sets the neutralization profile of murid herpesvirus 4
    Laurent Gillet
    Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
    J Gen Virol 90:1202-14. 2009
  5. pmc Murid herpesvirus-4 lacking thymidine kinase reveals route-dependent requirements for host colonization
    Michael B Gill
    Division of Virology, Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
    J Gen Virol 90:1461-70. 2009
  6. pmc Antibody limits in vivo murid herpesvirus-4 replication by IgG Fc receptor-dependent functions
    Debbie E Wright
    Division of Virology, Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge, UK
    J Gen Virol 90:2592-603. 2009
  7. pmc Vaccination with murid herpesvirus-4 glycoprotein B reduces viral lytic replication but does not induce detectable virion neutralization
    Janet S May
    Division of Virology, Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge, UK
    J Gen Virol 91:2542-52. 2010
  8. pmc An in vitro system for studying murid herpesvirus-4 latency and reactivation
    Janet S May
    Division of Virology, Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
    PLoS ONE 5:e11080. 2010
  9. pmc In vivo function of the murid herpesvirus-4 ribonucleotide reductase small subunit
    Ricardo Milho
    Division of Virology, Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 1QP, UK
    J Gen Virol 92:1550-60. 2011
  10. pmc A mechanistic basis for potent, glycoprotein B-directed gammaherpesvirus neutralization
    Daniel L Glauser
    Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
    J Gen Virol 92:2020-33. 2011

Collaborators

  • Laurent Gillet
  • Stacey Efstathiou
  • J P Simas
  • Heiko Adler
  • P J Lehner
  • P C Doherty
  • S Hawke
  • Janet S May
  • Michael B Gill
  • Ricardo Milho
  • Daniel L Glauser
  • Christopher M Smith
  • Miguel Gaspar
  • Bruno Frederico
  • Debbie E Wright
  • Maitreyi Shivkumar
  • Anne Sophie Kratz
  • Susanna Colaco
  • Gustavo T Rosa
  • Michael P Nicoll
  • J M Boname
  • A Bridgeman
  • Soumi Sukla
  • Gabrielle T Belz
  • Neil J Bennett
  • Marta Alenquer
  • Camilo Colaco
  • Sofia Marques
  • Rachel Edgar
  • Jens Bernhard Lösing
  • Brigitte D de Lima

Detail Information

Publications35

  1. pmc Herpes simplex virus 1 targets the murine olfactory neuroepithelium for host entry
    Maitreyi Shivkumar
    Division of Virology, Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge, Addenbrookes Hospital, Cambridge, United Kingdom
    J Virol 87:10477-88. 2013
    ..This recapitulation of typical clinical infection suggests that HSV-1 might sometimes also enter humans via the respiratory tract. ..
  2. pmc In vivo imaging of murid herpesvirus-4 infection
    Ricardo Milho
    Division of Virology, Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge, UK
    J Gen Virol 90:21-32. 2009
    ..Low dose intranasal infection without anaesthesia seems most likely to mimic natural transmission, and may therefore be particularly informative about normal viral gene functions...
  3. pmc In vivo importance of heparan sulfate-binding glycoproteins for murid herpesvirus-4 infection
    Laurent Gillet
    Division of Virology, Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge, UK
    J Gen Virol 90:602-13. 2009
    ..And gp150 disruption, which allows HS-independent cell binding, largely rescued the gL(-)gp70(-) cell binding and host entry deficits. Thus, it appeared that MuHV-4 HS binding is important in vivo, principally for efficient host entry...
  4. pmc Glycoprotein L sets the neutralization profile of murid herpesvirus 4
    Laurent Gillet
    Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
    J Gen Virol 90:1202-14. 2009
    ..gL therefore limits MuHV-4 neutralization by providing redundancy in cell binding and by keeping key elements of the virion fusion machinery hidden until after endocytosis...
  5. pmc Murid herpesvirus-4 lacking thymidine kinase reveals route-dependent requirements for host colonization
    Michael B Gill
    Division of Virology, Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
    J Gen Virol 90:1461-70. 2009
    ..Therefore TK, and by implication lytic replication, is required for MuHV-4 to establish a significant infection by a non-invasive route...
  6. pmc Antibody limits in vivo murid herpesvirus-4 replication by IgG Fc receptor-dependent functions
    Debbie E Wright
    Division of Virology, Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge, UK
    J Gen Virol 90:2592-603. 2009
    ..Therefore, passive antibody can blunt acute gamma-herpesvirus lytic infection, and does this principally by IgG Fc-dependent functions rather than by neutralization...
  7. pmc Vaccination with murid herpesvirus-4 glycoprotein B reduces viral lytic replication but does not induce detectable virion neutralization
    Janet S May
    Division of Virology, Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge, UK
    J Gen Virol 91:2542-52. 2010
    ..gB and gB-N also boosted neutralizing responses in only a minority of carrier mice. Therefore, it appears that neutralizing epitopes on gB are intrinsically difficult for the immune response to target...
  8. pmc An in vitro system for studying murid herpesvirus-4 latency and reactivation
    Janet S May
    Division of Virology, Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
    PLoS ONE 5:e11080. 2010
    ..Productive virus reactivation was then induced with doxycycline. We used this system to show that the MuHV-4 K3 gene plays a significant role in protecting reactivating cells against CD8(+) T cell recognition...
  9. pmc In vivo function of the murid herpesvirus-4 ribonucleotide reductase small subunit
    Ricardo Milho
    Division of Virology, Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 1QP, UK
    J Gen Virol 92:1550-60. 2011
    ..This seemed to reflect a requirement for lytic replication to occur in a terminally differentiated cell before a viable pool of latent genomes could be established...
  10. pmc A mechanistic basis for potent, glycoprotein B-directed gammaherpesvirus neutralization
    Daniel L Glauser
    Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
    J Gen Virol 92:2020-33. 2011
    ..The conservation of gB makes this mechanism a possible general route to gammaherpesvirus neutralization...
  11. pmc Murid herpesvirus-4 exploits dendritic cells to infect B cells
    Miguel Gaspar
    Division of Virology, Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
    PLoS Pathog 7:e1002346. 2011
    ..In vitro MuHV-4 dramatically altered the DC cytoskeleton, suggesting that it manipulates DC migration and shape in order to spread. MuHV-4 therefore uses DCs to colonize B cells...
  12. pmc Herpesvirus glycoproteins undergo multiple antigenic changes before membrane fusion
    Daniel L Glauser
    Division of Virology, Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 7:e30152. 2012
    ..The substantial antigenic differences between this form and that of extracellular virions suggested that antibodies have only a limited opportunity to block virion membrane fusion...
  13. pmc Virion endocytosis is a major target for murid herpesvirus-4 neutralization
    Daniel L Glauser
    Division of Virology, Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge, UK
    J Gen Virol 93:1316-27. 2012
    ..Therefore, driving virion uptake appears to be an important function of gH-gL that provides a major target for antibody-mediated neutralization...
  14. pmc Myeloid infection links epithelial and B cell tropisms of Murid Herpesvirus-4
    Bruno Frederico
    Division of Virology, Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge, Addenbrookes Hospital, Cambridge, United Kingdom
    PLoS Pathog 8:e1002935. 2012
    ..These data identify new complexity in rhadinovirus infection and potentially also new vulnerability to intervention...
  15. pmc A heparan-dependent herpesvirus targets the olfactory neuroepithelium for host entry
    Ricardo Milho
    Division of Virology, Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
    PLoS Pathog 8:e1002986. 2012
    ..Thus the olfactory neuroepithelium provides an important and complex site of HS-dependent herpesvirus uptake...
  16. pmc The Murid Herpesvirus-4 gL regulates an entry-associated conformation change in gH
    Laurent Gillet
    Division of Virology, Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 3:e2811. 2008
    ..These data argue that gL plays a key role in regulating a gH and gB functional switch from cell binding to membrane fusion...
  17. pmc Multiple functions for ORF75c in murid herpesvirus-4 infection
    Miguel Gaspar
    Division of Virology, Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 3:e2781. 2008
    ..The original host enzyme has therefore evolved into a set of distinct and multi-functional viral tegument proteins. One important function is moving incoming capsids to the nuclear margin for viral genome delivery...
  18. pmc Glycoprotein B switches conformation during murid herpesvirus 4 entry
    Laurent Gillet
    Division of Virology, Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge, UK
    J Gen Virol 89:1352-63. 2008
    ..Their need to engage a less vulnerable, upstream form of gB, because its fusion form is revealed only in endosomes, helps to explain why gB-directed MuHV-4 neutralization is so difficult...
  19. pmc Glycosaminoglycan interactions in murine gammaherpesvirus-68 infection
    Laurent Gillet
    Division of Virology, Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 2:e347. 2007
    ..In contrast to gp70, gp150 bound poorly to GAGs, implying that it provides little in the way of adhesion. We hypothesize that it acts instead as a GAG-sensitive switch that selectively activates MHV-68 entry at cell surfaces...
  20. pmc The murine gammaherpesvirus-68 gp150 acts as an immunogenic decoy to limit virion neutralization
    Laurent Gillet
    Division of Virology, Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 2:e705. 2007
    ..This immune evasion mechanism may be common to many non-essential herpesvirus glycoproteins...
  21. pmc Post-exposure vaccination improves gammaherpesvirus neutralization
    Laurent Gillet
    Division of Virology, Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge, Addenbrookes Hospital, Cambridge, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 2:e899. 2007
    ..This approach has the potential to reduce herpesvirus transmission...
  22. pmc Murine gammaherpesvirus-68 inhibits antigen presentation by dendritic cells
    Christopher M Smith
    Division of Virology, Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 2:e1048. 2007
    ..Instead it probably helps to maintain lytic gene expression in DCs once CD8(+) T cell priming has occurred...
  23. pmc Murine gammaherpesvirus-68 glycoprotein B presents a difficult neutralization target to monoclonal antibodies derived from infected mice
    Laurent Gillet
    Division of Virology, Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge CB2 1QP, UK
    J Gen Virol 87:3515-27. 2006
    ..Virions saturated with antibody also remained infectious to mice. Thus, the MHV-68 gB presents at best a very difficult target for antibody-mediated neutralization...
  24. pmc Antibody evasion by the N terminus of murid herpesvirus-4 glycoprotein B
    Laurent Gillet
    Division of Virology, Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
    EMBO J 26:5131-42. 2007
    ..Interestingly, the gB-NT glycans that blocked antibody binding could be targeted for neutralization instead by a lectin, suggesting a means of therapeutic counterattack...
  25. pmc The murid herpesvirus-4 gH/gL binds to glycosaminoglycans
    Laurent Gillet
    Division of Virology, Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 3:e1669. 2008
    ..MuHV-4 GAG dependence is consequently two-fold: gp70 or gH/gL binding provides virions with a vital first foothold, and gp150 is then engaged to reveal GAG-independent binding...
  26. pmc A gamma-herpesvirus glycoprotein complex manipulates actin to promote viral spread
    Michael B Gill
    Division of Virology, Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 3:e1808. 2008
    ..Gp48/ORF58 therefore represents a conserved module by which gamma-herpesviruses rearrange cellular actin to increase intercellular contacts and thereby promote their spread...
  27. pmc An essential role for the proximal but not the distal cytoplasmic tail of glycoprotein M in murid herpesvirus 4 infection
    Janet S May
    Division of Virology, Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 3:e2131. 2008
    ..We conclude that some elements of the gM cytoplasmic tail are dispensible for MuHV-4 replication, but the tail as a whole is not...
  28. pmc IgG fc receptors provide an alternative infection route for murine gamma-herpesvirus-68
    Gustavo T Rosa
    Division of Virology, Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 2:e560. 2007
    ..One difference between these settings is the availability of immunoglobulin Fc receptors. The question therefore arises whether a herpesvirus exposed to apparently neutralizing antibody can still infect Fc receptor(+) cells...
  29. pmc Vaccination against a hit-and-run viral cancer
    Philip G Stevenson
    Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge, UK
    J Gen Virol 91:2176-85. 2010
    ..Equivalent human gammaherpesvirus vaccines could therefore potentially prevent not only viral genome-positive cancers, but possibly also some cancers less suspected of a viral origin because of viral genome loss...
  30. doi request reprint Immune control of mammalian gamma-herpesviruses: lessons from murid herpesvirus-4
    P G Stevenson
    Division of Virology, Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge, UK
    J Gen Virol 90:2317-30. 2009
    ..Reducing the infectivity of herpesvirus carriers in this way could be a useful adjunct to vaccinating naive individuals with attenuated mutants...
  31. pmc A secreted chemokine binding protein encoded by murine gammaherpesvirus-68 is necessary for the establishment of a normal latent load
    A Bridgeman
    Division of Virology, Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge CB2 1QP, United Kingdom
    J Exp Med 194:301-12. 2001
    ..In the absence of M3, MHV-68 was unable to establish a normal latent load...
  32. ncbi request reprint K3-mediated evasion of CD8(+) T cells aids amplification of a latent gamma-herpesvirus
    P G Stevenson
    Division of Virology, Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge CB2 1QP, UK
    Nat Immunol 3:733-40. 2002
    ..CTL depletion reversed the viral latency deficit. Thus, a major function of K3 appears to be CTL evasion during viral latency expansion...
  33. pmc Inhibition of MHC class I-restricted antigen presentation by gamma 2-herpesviruses
    P G Stevenson
    Division of Virology, Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge CB2 1QP, United Kingdom
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 97:8455-60. 2000
    ..Thus it appears that an immune evasion strategy shared by at least two gamma-herpesviruses allows continued lytic infection in the face of strong CTL immunity...
  34. ncbi request reprint Uncoupling of virus-induced inflammation and anti-viral immunity in the brain parenchyma
    P G Stevenson
    Nuffield Department of Medicine, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, UK
    J Gen Virol 83:1735-43. 2002
    ..Thus, inflammation and dendritic cell function were both uncoupled from immune priming in the microenvironment of the brain parenchyma and neither was sufficient to overcome immunological privilege...
  35. ncbi request reprint MHC class I ubiquitination by a viral PHD/LAP finger protein
    J M Boname
    Department of Pathology, Division of Virology, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge CB2 1QP, United Kingdom
    Immunity 15:627-36. 2001
    ..Thus, gamma-herpesviruses have adapted the cellular PHD/LAP motif to immune evasion, apparently for the catalysis of MHC class I ubiquitination...