Emmanuel A Stamatakis

Summary

Affiliation: University of Cambridge
Country: UK

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Neuroimaging in eating disorders
    Emmanuel A Stamatakis
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EB, UK
    Nutr Neurosci 6:325-34. 2003
  2. ncbi request reprint Cingulate control of fronto-temporal integration reflects linguistic demands: a three-way interaction in functional connectivity
    E A Stamatakis
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, UK
    Neuroimage 28:115-21. 2005
  3. pmc Altered functional connectivity in the motor network after traumatic brain injury
    M Kasahara
    Division of Anaesthesia, University Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Addenbrooke s Hospital, Hills Road, Cambridge CB2 2QQ, UK
    Neurology 75:168-76. 2010
  4. pmc White matter changes and word finding failures with increasing age
    Emmanuel A Stamatakis
    Division of Anaesthesia, School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 6:e14496. 2011
  5. ncbi request reprint Identifying lesions on structural brain images--validation of the method and application to neuropsychological patients
    Emmanuel A Stamatakis
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, UK
    Brain Lang 94:167-77. 2005
  6. pmc Changes in resting neural connectivity during propofol sedation
    Emmanuel A Stamatakis
    Division of Anaesthesia, School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 5:e14224. 2010
  7. pmc Preserving syntactic processing across the adult life span: the modulation of the frontotemporal language system in the context of age-related atrophy
    Lorraine K Tyler
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Addenbrooke s Hospital, Cambridge CB2 3EB, UK
    Cereb Cortex 20:352-64. 2010
  8. pmc Functional organization of the neural language system: dorsal and ventral pathways are critical for syntax
    John D Griffiths
    Centre for Speech, Language and the Brain, Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EB, UK
    Cereb Cortex 23:139-47. 2013
  9. doi request reprint Is left fronto-temporal connectivity essential for syntax? Effective connectivity, tractography and performance in left-hemisphere damaged patients
    Marina Papoutsi
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
    Neuroimage 58:656-64. 2011
  10. pmc Left inferior frontal cortex and syntax: function, structure and behaviour in patients with left hemisphere damage
    Lorraine K Tyler
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
    Brain 134:415-31. 2011

Detail Information

Publications39

  1. ncbi request reprint Neuroimaging in eating disorders
    Emmanuel A Stamatakis
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EB, UK
    Nutr Neurosci 6:325-34. 2003
    ..Taken together with the structural and functional changes observed in the ED, neuroimaging provides a powerful platform to identify the underlying trait-related pathophysiological mechanisms in the aetiology and maintenance of AN and BN...
  2. ncbi request reprint Cingulate control of fronto-temporal integration reflects linguistic demands: a three-way interaction in functional connectivity
    E A Stamatakis
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, UK
    Neuroimage 28:115-21. 2005
    ..These findings suggest a monitoring role for the ACC which, in the context of processing regular inflected words, is associated with greater engagement of an integrated fronto-temporal language system...
  3. pmc Altered functional connectivity in the motor network after traumatic brain injury
    M Kasahara
    Division of Anaesthesia, University Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Addenbrooke s Hospital, Hills Road, Cambridge CB2 2QQ, UK
    Neurology 75:168-76. 2010
    ..The aim of this cross-sectional study was to establish the residual integrity of the motor network as an important proof of principle of abnormal connectivity in TBI...
  4. pmc White matter changes and word finding failures with increasing age
    Emmanuel A Stamatakis
    Division of Anaesthesia, School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 6:e14496. 2011
    ..In the current study, we examined the relationship between age-related changes in white matter and language production. More specifically, we concentrated on word-finding failures, which increase with age...
  5. ncbi request reprint Identifying lesions on structural brain images--validation of the method and application to neuropsychological patients
    Emmanuel A Stamatakis
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, UK
    Brain Lang 94:167-77. 2005
    ..001. This proposed method produced highly satisfactory results and can be used to generate reproducible detection of lesions...
  6. pmc Changes in resting neural connectivity during propofol sedation
    Emmanuel A Stamatakis
    Division of Anaesthesia, School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 5:e14224. 2010
    ....
  7. pmc Preserving syntactic processing across the adult life span: the modulation of the frontotemporal language system in the context of age-related atrophy
    Lorraine K Tyler
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Addenbrooke s Hospital, Cambridge CB2 3EB, UK
    Cereb Cortex 20:352-64. 2010
    ..We argue that preserved syntactic processing across the life span is due to the shift from a primarily left hemisphere frontotemporal system to a bilateral functional language network...
  8. pmc Functional organization of the neural language system: dorsal and ventral pathways are critical for syntax
    John D Griffiths
    Centre for Speech, Language and the Brain, Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EB, UK
    Cereb Cortex 23:139-47. 2013
    ....
  9. doi request reprint Is left fronto-temporal connectivity essential for syntax? Effective connectivity, tractography and performance in left-hemisphere damaged patients
    Marina Papoutsi
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
    Neuroimage 58:656-64. 2011
    ....
  10. pmc Left inferior frontal cortex and syntax: function, structure and behaviour in patients with left hemisphere damage
    Lorraine K Tyler
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
    Brain 134:415-31. 2011
    ..On this view, the left inferior frontal gyrus may not itself be specialized for syntactic processing, but plays an essential role in the neural network that carries out syntactic computations...
  11. doi request reprint Word retrieval failures in old age: the relationship between structure and function
    Meredith A Shafto
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
    J Cogn Neurosci 22:1530-40. 2010
    ..However, atrophy undermines older adults' ability to modulate neural responses needed to overcome retrieval failures...
  12. pmc Age-related neural reorganization during spoken word recognition: the interaction of form and meaning
    Meredith Shafto
    University of Cambridge, UK
    J Cogn Neurosci 24:1434-46. 2012
    ..These results support previous findings that neural compensation underpins preserved comprehension in aging and demonstrate that neural reorganization can affect the balance between semantic and phonological processing...
  13. pmc Differentiating hemispheric contributions to syntax and semantics in patients with left-hemisphere lesions
    Paul Wright
    Centre for Speech, Language and the Brain, Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB2 3EB, United Kingdom
    J Neurosci 32:8149-57. 2012
    ..Our findings support the dual neurocognitive model of spoken language comprehension and emphasize the importance of linguistic specificity in investigations of language recovery in patients...
  14. ncbi request reprint Temporal and frontal systems in speech comprehension: an fMRI study of past tense processing
    Lorraine K Tyler
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB 3EB, UK
    Neuropsychologia 43:1963-74. 2005
    ....
  15. pmc Reorganization of syntactic processing following left-hemisphere brain damage: does right-hemisphere activity preserve function?
    Lorraine K Tyler
    Centre for Speech, Language and the Brain, Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EB, UK
    Brain 133:3396-408. 2010
    ..This establishes the unique role of the left hemisphere in syntax, a core component in human language...
  16. doi request reprint Complementary hemispheric asymmetries in object naming and recognition: a voxel-based correlational study
    K Acres
    Department of Experimental Psychology, Centre for Speech, Language and the Brain, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
    Neuropsychologia 47:1836-43. 2009
    ....
  17. doi request reprint The interaction of lexical semantics and cohort competition in spoken word recognition: an fMRI study
    Jie Zhuang
    Centre for Speech, Language and the Brain, Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
    J Cogn Neurosci 23:3778-90. 2011
    ....
  18. pmc Dynamic processing in the human language system: synergy between the arcuate fascicle and extreme capsule
    Tyler Rolheiser
    Centre for Speech, Language, and the Brain, Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EB, United Kingdom
    J Neurosci 31:16949-57. 2011
    ..ROI analyses of the arcuate fascicle and extreme capsule supported this finding. These data suggest that natural language function is more likely to reflect a synergistic system rather than a segregated dual-stream system...
  19. doi request reprint Crossmodal integration of object features: voxel-based correlations in brain-damaged patients
    Kirsten I Taylor
    Centre for Speech, Language and the Brain, Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EB, UK
    Brain 132:671-83. 2009
    ....
  20. doi request reprint Modulation of motor and premotor cortices by actions, action words and action sentences
    Ana Raposo
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EB, UK
    Neuropsychologia 47:388-96. 2009
    ....
  21. pmc On the tip-of-the-tongue: neural correlates of increased word-finding failures in normal aging
    Meredith A Shafto
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
    J Cogn Neurosci 19:2060-70. 2007
    ....
  22. ncbi request reprint Conceptual structure modulates anteromedial temporal involvement in processing verbally presented object properties
    Peter Bright
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
    Cereb Cortex 17:1066-73. 2007
    ....
  23. ncbi request reprint The anatomy of object processing: the role of anteromedial temporal cortex
    Peter Bright
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, UK
    Q J Exp Psychol B 58:361-77. 2005
    ....
  24. doi request reprint Traumatic brain injury alters the functional brain network mediating working memory
    Maki Kasahara
    Division of Anaesthesia, University of Cambridge, Addenbrooke s Hospital, UK
    Brain Inj 25:1170-87. 2011
    ..Investigation of the impact of traumatic brain injury (TBI) on the functional brain network that mediates working memory function...
  25. ncbi request reprint Dissociating neuro-cognitive component processes: voxel-based correlational methodology
    Lorraine K Tyler
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
    Neuropsychologia 43:771-8. 2005
    ....
  26. pmc Binding crossmodal object features in perirhinal cortex
    Kirsten I Taylor
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EB, United Kingdom
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103:8239-44. 2006
    ..These results integrate nonhuman and human primate research by providing converging evidence that human perirhinal cortex is also critically involved in processing meaningful aspects of multimodal object representations...
  27. doi request reprint Longitudinal studies of semantic dementia: the relationship between structural and functional changes over time
    P Bright
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EB, UK
    Neuropsychologia 46:2177-88. 2008
    ....
  28. ncbi request reprint Grammatical categories in the brain: the role of morphological structure
    O Longe
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Site, Cambridge CB2 3EB, UK
    Cereb Cortex 17:1812-20. 2007
    ..These results support the claim that form class is not a first-order organizing principle underlying the representation of words but rather interacts with the processes that operate over lexical representations...
  29. ncbi request reprint Deficits for semantics and the irregular past tense: a causal relationship?
    Lorraine K Tyler
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 ODX, UK
    J Cogn Neurosci 16:1159-72. 2004
    ....
  30. ncbi request reprint SPECT imaging in head injury interpreted with statistical parametric mapping
    Emmanuel A Stamatakis
    Department of Psychology, University of Stirling, Stirling, Scotland, United Kingdom
    J Nucl Med 43:476-83. 2002
    ..This study investigated regional cerebral blood flow in head-injured patients using statistical parametric mapping (SPM) to detect hypoperfusion on (99m)Tc-hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime (HMPAO) SPECT scans...
  31. ncbi request reprint Differentiating morphology, form, and meaning: neural correlates of morphological complexity
    Mirjana Bozic
    MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, UK
    J Cogn Neurosci 19:1464-75. 2007
    ..Morphological effects were observed separately from processing form and meaning and we propose that they reflect segmentation of complex derived words, a process triggered by surface morphological structure of complex words...
  32. pmc Differentiating lexical form, meaning, and structure in the neural language system
    L K Tyler
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EB, United Kingdom
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102:8375-80. 2005
    ..The correlational analyses provide clear evidence for a functional differentiation between different brain regions associated with the processing of lexical form, meaning, and morphological structure...
  33. ncbi request reprint Repetition suppression and semantic enhancement: an investigation of the neural correlates of priming
    A Raposo
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EB, UK
    Neuropsychologia 44:2284-95. 2006
    ..e. semantic enhancement. The results suggest that repetition and semantic priming in visual word recognition depend on distinct cognitive processes and neural substrates...
  34. ncbi request reprint Processing objects at different levels of specificity
    L K Tyler
    University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
    J Cogn Neurosci 16:351-62. 2004
    ..These results suggest that the same kind of hierarchical structure, which has been proposed for object processing in the monkey temporal cortex, functions in the human...
  35. ncbi request reprint Neural processing of nouns and verbs: the role of inflectional morphology
    L K Tyler
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EB, UK
    Neuropsychologia 42:512-23. 2004
    ....
  36. ncbi request reprint Objects and their actions: evidence for a neurally distributed semantic system
    L K Tyler
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, CB2 3EB, Cambridge, UK
    Neuroimage 18:542-57. 2003
    ..However, there was no evidence of category specificity for either objects or actions, with essentially the same activations for the form and motion attributes of both living and nonliving categories...
  37. doi request reprint Cortical differentiation for nouns and verbs depends on grammatical markers
    L K Tyler
    Centre for Speech, Language, and the Brain, Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
    J Cogn Neurosci 20:1381-9. 2008
    ..These results suggest that nouns and verbs do not invariably activate different neural regions; rather, differential cortical activity depends on the extent to which their different grammatical functions are engaged...
  38. ncbi request reprint Anteromedial temporal cortex supports fine-grained differentiation among objects
    H E Moss
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EB, UK
    Cereb Cortex 15:616-27. 2005
    ....
  39. ncbi request reprint Temporal lobe lesions and semantic impairment: a comparison of herpes simplex virus encephalitis and semantic dementia
    Uta Noppeney
    Wellcome Department of Imaging Neuroscience, Institute of Neurology, London, UK
    Brain 130:1138-47. 2007
    ....