F Spoor

Summary

Affiliation: University College London
Country: UK

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Rare temporal bone pathology of the Singa calvaria from Sudan
    F Spoor
    Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, University College London, United Kingdom
    Am J Phys Anthropol 107:41-50. 1998
  2. ncbi request reprint Implications of new early Homo fossils from Ileret, east of Lake Turkana, Kenya
    F Spoor
    Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK
    Nature 448:688-91. 2007
  3. ncbi request reprint Vestibular evidence for the evolution of aquatic behaviour in early cetaceans
    F Spoor
    Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, University College London, Rockefeller Building, University Street, London WC1E 6JJ, UK
    Nature 417:163-6. 2002
  4. ncbi request reprint The bony labyrinth of Neanderthals
    Fred Spoor
    Evolutionary Anatomy Unit, Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, University College London, Rockefeller Building, University Street, London WC1E 6JJ, UK
    J Hum Evol 44:141-65. 2003
  5. ncbi request reprint Brain size and the human cranial base: a prenatal perspective
    Nathan Jeffery
    Evolutionary Anatomy Unit, Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, University College London, London WC1E 6JJ, UK
    Am J Phys Anthropol 118:324-40. 2002
  6. pmc The primate semicircular canal system and locomotion
    Fred Spoor
    Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, United Kingdom
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:10808-12. 2007
  7. ncbi request reprint A juvenile early hominin skeleton from Dikika, Ethiopia
    Zeresenay Alemseged
    Department of Human Evolution, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, 04103 Leipzig, Germany
    Nature 443:296-301. 2006
  8. ncbi request reprint The primate subarcuate fossa and its relationship to the semicircular canals part I: prenatal growth
    Nathan Jeffery
    Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Biology, School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Liverpool, Ashton Street, Liverpool, L69 3GE, UK
    J Hum Evol 51:537-49. 2006
  9. pmc Prenatal growth and development of the modern human labyrinth
    Nathan Jeffery
    Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Liverpool, UK
    J Anat 204:71-92. 2004
  10. ncbi request reprint Ancestral loss of the maxillary sinus in Old World monkeys and independent acquisition in Macaca
    Todd C Rae
    Evolutionary Anthropology Research Group, Department of Anthropology, University of Durham, 43 Old Elvet, Durham DH1 3HN, UK
    Am J Phys Anthropol 117:293-6. 2002

Detail Information

Publications12

  1. ncbi request reprint Rare temporal bone pathology of the Singa calvaria from Sudan
    F Spoor
    Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, University College London, United Kingdom
    Am J Phys Anthropol 107:41-50. 1998
    ....
  2. ncbi request reprint Implications of new early Homo fossils from Ileret, east of Lake Turkana, Kenya
    F Spoor
    Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK
    Nature 448:688-91. 2007
    ..habilis and H. erectus, independently of overall cranial size, and suggest that these two early taxa were living broadly sympatrically in the same lake basin for almost half a million years...
  3. ncbi request reprint Vestibular evidence for the evolution of aquatic behaviour in early cetaceans
    F Spoor
    Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, University College London, Rockefeller Building, University Street, London WC1E 6JJ, UK
    Nature 417:163-6. 2002
    ..We hypothesize that the unparalleled modification of the semicircular canal system represented a key 'point of no return' event in early cetacean evolution, leading to full independence from life on land...
  4. ncbi request reprint The bony labyrinth of Neanderthals
    Fred Spoor
    Evolutionary Anatomy Unit, Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, University College London, Rockefeller Building, University Street, London WC1E 6JJ, UK
    J Hum Evol 44:141-65. 2003
    ....
  5. ncbi request reprint Brain size and the human cranial base: a prenatal perspective
    Nathan Jeffery
    Evolutionary Anatomy Unit, Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, University College London, London WC1E 6JJ, UK
    Am J Phys Anthropol 118:324-40. 2002
    ..Thus, the propositions that base flexion and petrous reorientation are due to increases of relative endocranial sizes were not corroborated by the findings of this study, at least for the period investigated...
  6. pmc The primate semicircular canal system and locomotion
    Fred Spoor
    Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, United Kingdom
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:10808-12. 2007
    ..Primate and other mammalian species studied here that are agile and have fast, jerky locomotion have significantly larger canals relative to body mass than those that move more cautiously...
  7. ncbi request reprint A juvenile early hominin skeleton from Dikika, Ethiopia
    Zeresenay Alemseged
    Department of Human Evolution, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, 04103 Leipzig, Germany
    Nature 443:296-301. 2006
    ..afarensis locomotor repertoire...
  8. ncbi request reprint The primate subarcuate fossa and its relationship to the semicircular canals part I: prenatal growth
    Nathan Jeffery
    Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Biology, School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Liverpool, Ashton Street, Liverpool, L69 3GE, UK
    J Hum Evol 51:537-49. 2006
    ....
  9. pmc Prenatal growth and development of the modern human labyrinth
    Nathan Jeffery
    Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Liverpool, UK
    J Anat 204:71-92. 2004
    ..Findings are discussed in terms of the ontogenetic processes and mechanisms that most likely led, in part, to the emergence of the phylogenetically derived adult modern human labyrinth...
  10. ncbi request reprint Ancestral loss of the maxillary sinus in Old World monkeys and independent acquisition in Macaca
    Todd C Rae
    Evolutionary Anthropology Research Group, Department of Anthropology, University of Durham, 43 Old Elvet, Durham DH1 3HN, UK
    Am J Phys Anthropol 117:293-6. 2002
    ..The results suggest that the maxillary sinus found in the genus Macaca is not homologous with that of other eutherians, which may provide insights into the origin and function (if any) of the paranasal pneumatizations...
  11. ncbi request reprint Ossification and midline shape changes of the human fetal cranial base
    Nathan Jeffery
    Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3GE, United Kingdom
    Am J Phys Anthropol 123:78-90. 2004
    ..While ossification cannot be directly linked with the shape variations observed, it seems likely that bone formation plays a role in modulating the influence of other factors on the fetal cranial base...
  12. doi request reprint The primate subarcuate fossa and its relationship to the semicircular canals part II: adult interspecific variation
    Nathan Jeffery
    Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Liverpool, Ashton Street, Liverpool L69 3GE, UK
    J Hum Evol 55:326-39. 2008
    ..The findings show that the most reliable functional signals pertaining to locomotion in species that possess a patent subarcuate fossa are likely to come from the lateral canal and are least likely to come from the anterior canal...