Michael P Speed

Summary

Affiliation: University of Liverpool
Country: UK

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Why are defensive toxins so variable? An evolutionary perspective
    Michael P Speed
    Department of Evolution, Ecology and Behaviour, Institute of Integrative Biology, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, University of Liverpool, UK
    Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 87:874-84. 2012
  2. ncbi request reprint Diversification of honest signals in a predator-prey system
    Michael P Speed
    University of Liverpool, UK
    Ecol Lett 13:744-53. 2010
  3. doi request reprint Imperfect Batesian mimicry and the conspicuousness costs of mimetic resemblance
    Michael P Speed
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZB, United Kingdom
    Am Nat 176:E1-14. 2010
  4. doi request reprint The dual benefits of aposematism: predator avoidance and enhanced resource collection
    Michael P Speed
    School of Biological Sciences, Biosciences, University of Liverpool, Crown Street, Liverpool L69 7ZB, United Kingdom
    Evolution 64:1622-33. 2010
  5. pmc Warning displays may function as honest signals of toxicity
    Jonathan D Blount
    School of Biosciences, University of Exeter, Cornwall Campus, Penryn TR10 9EZ, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 276:871-7. 2009
  6. doi request reprint Honest signaling and the uses of prey coloration
    Thomas J Lee
    Department of Evolution, Ecology, and Behaviour, Institute of Integrative Biology, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZB, United Kingdom
    Am Nat 178:E1-9. 2011
  7. doi request reprint The effect of metapopulation dynamics on the survival and spread of a novel, conspicuous prey
    Thomas J Lee
    School of Biological Science, Biosciences Building, Crown Street, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZB, UK
    J Theor Biol 267:319-29. 2010
  8. ncbi request reprint Co-mimics have a mutualistic relationship despite unequal defences
    Hannah M Rowland
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Liverpool, Biosciences Building, Crown Street, Liverpool L69 7ZB, UK
    Nature 448:64-7. 2007
  9. doi request reprint Mimicry between unequally defended prey can be parasitic: evidence for quasi-Batesian mimicry
    Hannah M Rowland
    Department of Evolution, Ecology and Behaviour, Institute of Integrative Biology, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Biosciences Building, University of Liverpool, Crown Street, Liverpool L697ZB, UK
    Ecol Lett 13:1494-502. 2010
  10. pmc Prey community structure affects how predators select for Mullerian mimicry
    Eira Ihalainen
    Department of Biological and Environmental Science, Centre of Excellence in Evolutionary Research, University of Jyvaskyla, PO Box 35, FI 40014 University of Jyvaskyla, Finland
    Proc Biol Sci 279:2099-105. 2012

Detail Information

Publications17

  1. doi request reprint Why are defensive toxins so variable? An evolutionary perspective
    Michael P Speed
    Department of Evolution, Ecology and Behaviour, Institute of Integrative Biology, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, University of Liverpool, UK
    Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 87:874-84. 2012
    ..Rather there are a number of compelling evolutionary hypotheses which can explain and predict variation in prey toxicity...
  2. ncbi request reprint Diversification of honest signals in a predator-prey system
    Michael P Speed
    University of Liverpool, UK
    Ecol Lett 13:744-53. 2010
    ..In addition to predicting within-species signal reliability, our model can explain the initial evolution of aposematic displays without the need to assume special biases in predators...
  3. doi request reprint Imperfect Batesian mimicry and the conspicuousness costs of mimetic resemblance
    Michael P Speed
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZB, United Kingdom
    Am Nat 176:E1-14. 2010
    ..The biological implications of these results, particularly for our understanding of imperfect mimicry, are discussed...
  4. doi request reprint The dual benefits of aposematism: predator avoidance and enhanced resource collection
    Michael P Speed
    School of Biological Sciences, Biosciences, University of Liverpool, Crown Street, Liverpool L69 7ZB, United Kingdom
    Evolution 64:1622-33. 2010
    ..One conclusion is that aposematism could be a key evolutionary innovation, because by widening habitat use it may promote adaptive radiation as a byproduct of enhanced ecological opportunity...
  5. pmc Warning displays may function as honest signals of toxicity
    Jonathan D Blount
    School of Biosciences, University of Exeter, Cornwall Campus, Penryn TR10 9EZ, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 276:871-7. 2009
    ..Thus, contrary to the prevailing theoretical orthodoxy, warning displays may in fact be honest signals of the level of (rather than simply the existence of) toxicity...
  6. doi request reprint Honest signaling and the uses of prey coloration
    Thomas J Lee
    Department of Evolution, Ecology, and Behaviour, Institute of Integrative Biology, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZB, United Kingdom
    Am Nat 178:E1-9. 2011
    ..In the latter case, toxicity correlated positively with degree of cryptic coloration. Predictions of toxin-signal correlation appear robust, but we can identify interesting conditions in which signal reliability is not predicted...
  7. doi request reprint The effect of metapopulation dynamics on the survival and spread of a novel, conspicuous prey
    Thomas J Lee
    School of Biological Science, Biosciences Building, Crown Street, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZB, UK
    J Theor Biol 267:319-29. 2010
    ..This pattern of initial loss and subsequent gain between new source and neighbouring sink habitats is then repeated as the aposematic form spreads via a moving cline...
  8. ncbi request reprint Co-mimics have a mutualistic relationship despite unequal defences
    Hannah M Rowland
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Liverpool, Biosciences Building, Crown Street, Liverpool L69 7ZB, UK
    Nature 448:64-7. 2007
    ..By ignoring the effects of density, current theories may have overestimated the parasitic costs imposed by less defended mimics on highly defended models...
  9. doi request reprint Mimicry between unequally defended prey can be parasitic: evidence for quasi-Batesian mimicry
    Hannah M Rowland
    Department of Evolution, Ecology and Behaviour, Institute of Integrative Biology, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Biosciences Building, University of Liverpool, Crown Street, Liverpool L697ZB, UK
    Ecol Lett 13:1494-502. 2010
    ..This result suggests that many prey species that are currently assumed to be in a simple mutualistic mimetic relationship with their co-mimic species may actually be engaged in an antagonistic co-evolutionary process...
  10. pmc Prey community structure affects how predators select for Mullerian mimicry
    Eira Ihalainen
    Department of Biological and Environmental Science, Centre of Excellence in Evolutionary Research, University of Jyvaskyla, PO Box 35, FI 40014 University of Jyvaskyla, Finland
    Proc Biol Sci 279:2099-105. 2012
    ..In diverse environments, the limited diets of specialist predators could create 'simple community pockets' where accurate mimicry is selected for...
  11. ncbi request reprint How bright and how nasty: explaining diversity in warning signal strength
    Michael P Speed
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZB, United Kingdom
    Evolution 61:623-35. 2007
    ..Finally, when displays incur no allocation costs there may be no single optimum value for aposematic conspicuousness, rather a large array of alternative forms of a display may have equal fitness...
  12. pmc Density-dependent predation influences the evolution and behavior of masquerading prey
    John Skelhorn
    Centre for Research in Animal Behaviour, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter, Washington Singer Laboratories, Exeter EX4 4QG, United Kingdom
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108:6532-6. 2011
    ..Careful evaluation of such costs will be vital to the development of a fuller understanding of both the distribution of masquerade across taxa and ecosystems, and the evolution of the life history strategies of masquerading prey...
  13. pmc When more is less: the fitness consequences of predators attacking more unpalatable prey when more are presented
    Hannah M Rowland
    The University of Liverpool, UK
    Biol Lett 6:732-5. 2010
    ..This suggests that the survival benefits of mimicry could be lower than Müller proposed. An important finding is, however, that these costs decline in importance as the total number of available prey increases...
  14. doi request reprint Effects of anti-predator defence through toxin sequestration on use of alternative food microhabitats by small herbivores
    Andrew D Higginson
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1UG, UK
    J Theor Biol 300:368-75. 2012
    ..We provide further testable predictions about the role of the plant's defence strategy and herbivore behaviour in tritrophic interactions...
  15. pmc Can't tell the caterpillars from the trees: countershading enhances survival in a woodland
    Hannah M Rowland
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Liverpool, Biosciences Building, Crown Street, Liverpool L69 7ZB, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 275:2539-45. 2008
    ....
  16. ncbi request reprint Warning displays in spiny animals: one (more) evolutionary route to aposematism
    Michael P Speed
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZB, United Kingdom
    Evolution 59:2499-508. 2005
    ..Finally, one (more) route by which aposematism may initially evolve is by spiny rather than purely chemically defended species, spreading to species with other forms of secondary defense as the signal becomes common...
  17. pmc Aposematism: what should our starting point be?
    Michael P Speed
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZB, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 272:431-8. 2005
    ..is much easier to explain because aposematic traits add little further costs of conspicuousness, but can bring large benefits...