S Senn

Summary

Affiliation: University College London
Country: UK

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Clinical cross-over trials in phase I
    S Senn
    Department of Statistical Science, University College London, UK
    Stat Methods Med Res 8:263-78. 1999
  2. ncbi request reprint Repeated measures in clinical trials: simple strategies for analysis using summary measures
    S Senn
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, 1 19 Torrington Place, London WC1E 6BT, U K
    Stat Med 19:861-77. 2000
  3. ncbi request reprint Statistical issues in bioequivalence [correction of bioequivalance]
    S Senn
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Department of Statistical Science, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, U K
    Stat Med 20:2785-99. 2001
  4. ncbi request reprint Ethical considerations concerning treatment allocation in drug development trials
    S Senn
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Department of Statistical Science, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK
    Stat Methods Med Res 11:403-11. 2002
  5. ncbi request reprint A comment on optimal allocations for bioequivalence studies
    S Senn
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, UK
    Biometrics 55:1314-5. 1999
  6. ncbi request reprint Two cheers for P-values?
    S Senn
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, UK
    J Epidemiol Biostat 6:193-204; discussion 205-10. 2001

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications6

  1. ncbi request reprint Clinical cross-over trials in phase I
    S Senn
    Department of Statistical Science, University College London, UK
    Stat Methods Med Res 8:263-78. 1999
    ..Design and analysis considerations are covered. We also consider the use of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic theories in planning cross-over trials. Finally some practical considerations are covered...
  2. ncbi request reprint Repeated measures in clinical trials: simple strategies for analysis using summary measures
    S Senn
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, 1 19 Torrington Place, London WC1E 6BT, U K
    Stat Med 19:861-77. 2000
    ..A compromise trend/mean measure, regression through the origin, is proposed as being useful under some circumstances. An analysis using this measure is illustrated with a suitable example...
  3. ncbi request reprint Statistical issues in bioequivalence [correction of bioequivalance]
    S Senn
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Department of Statistical Science, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, U K
    Stat Med 20:2785-99. 2001
    ..It is concluded that this purpose needs further clarification before guidelines for individual bioequivalence can be established and indeed that such guidelines may turn out to be unnecessary...
  4. ncbi request reprint Ethical considerations concerning treatment allocation in drug development trials
    S Senn
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Department of Statistical Science, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK
    Stat Methods Med Res 11:403-11. 2002
    ..Some device such as the 'original position' of the philosopher John Rawls is needed. Finally, it is argued that placebo run-ins involve a violation of consent and should be eliminated from clinical trials...
  5. ncbi request reprint A comment on optimal allocations for bioequivalence studies
    S Senn
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, UK
    Biometrics 55:1314-5. 1999
    ..A method purporting to provide optimal allocations in bioequivalence studies fails to do so on both statistical and practical grounds. Reasons as to why this is so are given...
  6. ncbi request reprint Two cheers for P-values?
    S Senn
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, UK
    J Epidemiol Biostat 6:193-204; discussion 205-10. 2001
    ..Bayesians in particular find them ridiculous, but even the modern frequentist has little time for them. In this essay, I consider what, if anything, might be said in their favour...