P J Rogers

Summary

Affiliation: University of Bristol
Country: UK

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Effects of caffeine and caffeine withdrawal on mood and cognitive performance degraded by sleep restriction
    Peter J Rogers
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, 8 Woodland Road, Bristol, BS8 1TN, UK
    Psychopharmacology (Berl) 179:742-52. 2005
  2. ncbi request reprint Faster but not smarter: effects of caffeine and caffeine withdrawal on alertness and performance
    Peter J Rogers
    School of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TU, UK
    Psychopharmacology (Berl) 226:229-40. 2013
  3. ncbi request reprint Time for tea: mood, blood pressure and cognitive performance effects of caffeine and theanine administered alone and together
    Peter J Rogers
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, 12a Woodland Road, Bristol, BS8 1TU, UK
    Psychopharmacology (Berl) 195:569-77. 2008
  4. ncbi request reprint No effect of n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (EPA and DHA) supplementation on depressed mood and cognitive function: a randomised controlled trial
    Peter J Rogers
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, UK
    Br J Nutr 99:421-31. 2008
  5. ncbi request reprint Absence of reinforcing, mood and psychomotor performance effects of caffeine in habitual non-consumers of caffeine
    Peter J Rogers
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, 8 Woodland Road, BS8 1TN, Bristol, UK
    Psychopharmacology (Berl) 167:54-62. 2003
  6. pmc Association of the anxiogenic and alerting effects of caffeine with ADORA2A and ADORA1 polymorphisms and habitual level of caffeine consumption
    Peter J Rogers
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK
    Neuropsychopharmacology 35:1973-83. 2010
  7. ncbi request reprint A healthy body, a healthy mind: long-term impact of diet on mood and cognitive function
    P J Rogers
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, UK
    Proc Nutr Soc 60:135-43. 2001
  8. ncbi request reprint Cognitive and psychomotor performance, mood, and pressor effects of caffeine after 4, 6 and 8 h caffeine abstinence
    Susan V Heatherley
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, 8 Woodland Road, Bristol, BS8 1TN, UK
    Psychopharmacology (Berl) 178:461-70. 2005
  9. ncbi request reprint Psychostimulant and other effects of caffeine in 9- to 11-year-old children
    Susan V Heatherley
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, 8 Woodland Road, Bristol BS8 1TN, UK
    J Child Psychol Psychiatry 47:135-42. 2006
  10. ncbi request reprint Effects of low doses of caffeine on cognitive performance, mood and thirst in low and higher caffeine consumers
    H J Smit
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, UK
    Psychopharmacology (Berl) 152:167-73. 2000

Detail Information

Publications28

  1. ncbi request reprint Effects of caffeine and caffeine withdrawal on mood and cognitive performance degraded by sleep restriction
    Peter J Rogers
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, 8 Woodland Road, Bristol, BS8 1TN, UK
    Psychopharmacology (Berl) 179:742-52. 2005
    ..It has been suggested that caffeine is most likely to benefit mood and performance when alertness is low...
  2. ncbi request reprint Faster but not smarter: effects of caffeine and caffeine withdrawal on alertness and performance
    Peter J Rogers
    School of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TU, UK
    Psychopharmacology (Berl) 226:229-40. 2013
    ..Despite 100 years of psychopharmacological research, the extent to which caffeine consumption benefits human functioning remains unclear...
  3. ncbi request reprint Time for tea: mood, blood pressure and cognitive performance effects of caffeine and theanine administered alone and together
    Peter J Rogers
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, 12a Woodland Road, Bristol, BS8 1TU, UK
    Psychopharmacology (Berl) 195:569-77. 2008
    ..There is also some evidence that theanine affects cognitive performance, and it has been found to reduce blood pressure in hypertensive rats...
  4. ncbi request reprint No effect of n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (EPA and DHA) supplementation on depressed mood and cognitive function: a randomised controlled trial
    Peter J Rogers
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, UK
    Br J Nutr 99:421-31. 2008
    ..Adding the present result to a meta-analysis of previous relevant randomised controlled trial results confirmed an overall negligible benefit of n-3 LCPUFA supplementation for depressed mood...
  5. ncbi request reprint Absence of reinforcing, mood and psychomotor performance effects of caffeine in habitual non-consumers of caffeine
    Peter J Rogers
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, 8 Woodland Road, BS8 1TN, Bristol, UK
    Psychopharmacology (Berl) 167:54-62. 2003
    ..Results showing positive psychostimulant effects of acute caffeine administration in habitual non-consumers of caffeine would provide evidence for a net benefit of caffeine unconfounded by withdrawal...
  6. pmc Association of the anxiogenic and alerting effects of caffeine with ADORA2A and ADORA1 polymorphisms and habitual level of caffeine consumption
    Peter J Rogers
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK
    Neuropsychopharmacology 35:1973-83. 2010
    ....
  7. ncbi request reprint A healthy body, a healthy mind: long-term impact of diet on mood and cognitive function
    P J Rogers
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, UK
    Proc Nutr Soc 60:135-43. 2001
    ..An efficient approach to this problem could be to include assessments of mood and cognitive function as outcome measures in studies designed primarily to investigate the impact of dietary interventions on markers of physical health...
  8. ncbi request reprint Cognitive and psychomotor performance, mood, and pressor effects of caffeine after 4, 6 and 8 h caffeine abstinence
    Susan V Heatherley
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, 8 Woodland Road, Bristol, BS8 1TN, UK
    Psychopharmacology (Berl) 178:461-70. 2005
    ..Many studies have found that caffeine consumed after overnight caffeine abstinence improves cognitive performance and mood. Much less is known, however, about the effects of caffeine after shorter periods of caffeine abstinence...
  9. ncbi request reprint Psychostimulant and other effects of caffeine in 9- to 11-year-old children
    Susan V Heatherley
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, 8 Woodland Road, Bristol BS8 1TN, UK
    J Child Psychol Psychiatry 47:135-42. 2006
    ..The effects of caffeine in children is an under-researched area, with only a handful of studies being carried out in the US where children's consumption of caffeine appears to be lower on average than in the UK...
  10. ncbi request reprint Effects of low doses of caffeine on cognitive performance, mood and thirst in low and higher caffeine consumers
    H J Smit
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, UK
    Psychopharmacology (Berl) 152:167-73. 2000
    ....
  11. ncbi request reprint Preoccupation, food, and failure: an investigation of cognitive performance deficits in dieters
    Nicola Jones
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom
    Int J Eat Disord 33:185-92. 2003
    ..Second, they are psychological in origin (i.e., preoccupation with dieting-related thoughts during dieting depletes the cognitive resources available for nondieting tasks)...
  12. ncbi request reprint Mood and cognitive performance effects of "energy" drink constituents: caffeine, glucose and carbonation
    H J Smit
    Department of Experimental Psychology, Bristol University, Bristol BS8 1TN, UK
    Nutr Neurosci 7:127-39. 2004
    ..Finally, carbonation had various effects on mood, some of which were present immediately following consumption, others were consistent with slower absorption of caffeine (and possibly carbohydrates) from carbonated drinks...
  13. ncbi request reprint Effects of a sweet and a nonsweet lunch on short-term appetite: differences in female high and low consumers of sweet/low-energy beverages
    K M Appleton
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK
    J Hum Nutr Diet 17:425-34. 2004
    ..This study investigates the proposal that the effects of sweet tastes on appetite may differ as a result of differing habitual experiences of sweetness with or without energy...
  14. ncbi request reprint Methylxanthines are the psycho-pharmacologically active constituents of chocolate
    Hendrik J Smit
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, 8 Woodland Road, Bristol, BS8 1TN, UK
    Psychopharmacology (Berl) 176:412-9. 2004
    ..Liking, cravings and addiction for chocolate ("chocoholism") are often explained through the presence of pharmacologically active compounds. However, mere "presence" does not guarantee psycho-activity...
  15. doi request reprint Perceived volume, expected satiation, and the energy content of self-selected meals
    Jeffrey M Brunstrom
    University of Bristol, England, UK
    Appetite 55:25-9. 2010
    ..8%) can be considered 'unique' and independent of the perceived physical dimensions of the foods. We suspect that this contribution reflects the effect of prior learning, based on actual satiation that has been experienced in the past...
  16. ncbi request reprint Caffeine abstinence: an ineffective and potentially distressing tinnitus therapy
    Lindsay St Claire
    Centre for Hearing and Balance Studies, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK
    Int J Audiol 49:24-9. 2010
    ..No evidence was found to justify caffeine abstinence as a therapy to alleviate tinnitus, but acute effects of caffeine withdrawal might add to the burden of tinnitus...
  17. doi request reprint How many calories are on our plate? Expected fullness, not liking, determines meal-size selection
    Jeffrey M Brunstrom
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK
    Obesity (Silver Spring) 17:1884-90. 2009
    ..Together, these findings challenge the role of palatability in meal-size selection and they highlight the importance of expected satiation, a "nonaffective" component of food reward...
  18. doi request reprint Oxytocin and social perception: oxytocin increases perceived facial trustworthiness and attractiveness
    Angeliki Theodoridou
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK
    Horm Behav 56:128-32. 2009
    ..Our results provide evidence in support of a general facilitative role of oxytocin in promoting positive trait judgements...
  19. ncbi request reprint Estimating everyday portion size using a 'method of constant stimuli': in a student sample, portion size is predicted by gender, dietary behaviour, and hunger, but not BMI
    Jeffrey M Brunstrom
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, 12a Priory Road, Bristol BS8 1TU, UK
    Appetite 51:296-301. 2008
    ..In particular, we suggest that the difference in total energy expenditure of individuals with a higher and lower BMI is too small to be detected as a concomitant difference in portion size (at least in our sample)...
  20. ncbi request reprint Role of familiarity on effects of caffeine- and glucose-containing soft drinks
    Hendrik J Smit
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, UK
    Physiol Behav 87:287-97. 2006
    ..The results illustrate the restorative combination of caffeine and CHO in the drink, and emphasises the need to implement the appropriate placebo(s) in any study design employing familiar foods or drinks...
  21. doi request reprint 'Expected satiety' changes hunger and fullness in the inter-meal interval
    Jeffrey M Brunstrom
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, 12a Priory Road, Bristol BS8 1TU, United Kingdom
    Appetite 56:310-5. 2011
    ..Potential explanations are discussed, including the prospect that satiety is moderated by memories of expected satiety that are encoded around the time that a meal is consumed...
  22. doi request reprint What determines real-world meal size? Evidence for pre-meal planning
    Stephanie H Fay
    School of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, 12a Priory Road, Bristol, BS8 1TU England, UK
    Appetite 56:284-9. 2011
    ..Logistic regression confirmed pre-meal planning as the most important predictor of consumption. Together, our findings demonstrate the importance of meal planning as a key determinant of meal size and energy intake...
  23. ncbi request reprint Advice to eat fish and mood: a randomised controlled trial in men with angina
    Andrew R Ness
    Department of Social Medicine, University of Bristol, Canynge Hall, Whiteladies Road, Bristol, UK
    Nutr Neurosci 6:63-5. 2003
    ..This trial provides no evidence that increased fatty fish intake in people without depressive symptoms has any substantial effect on mood...
  24. doi request reprint No appetite efficacy of a commercial structured lipid emulsion in minimally processed drinks
    H J Smit
    School of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK
    Int J Obes (Lond) 36:1222-8. 2012
    ..The present study assessed its efficacy in a yoghurt-based mini-drink undergoing low or minimal food manufacturing (thermal and shear) processes...
  25. ncbi request reprint Effects of n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids on depressed mood: systematic review of published trials
    Katherine M Appleton
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom
    Am J Clin Nutr 84:1308-16. 2006
    ..Greater dietary intakes of n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) may be beneficial for depressed mood...
  26. ncbi request reprint Effects of caffeine on performance and mood: withdrawal reversal is the most plausible explanation
    Jack E James
    Department of Psychology, National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland
    Psychopharmacology (Berl) 182:1-8. 2005
    ..The central question is whether superior performance and mood after caffeine represent net benefits, or whether differences between caffeine and control conditions are due to reversal of adverse withdrawal effects...
  27. ncbi request reprint Effects of caffeine on performance and mood depend on the level of caffeine abstinence
    Martin R Yeomans
    Experimental Psychology, University of Sussex, Brighton, UK
    Psychopharmacology (Berl) 164:241-9. 2002
    ..Most studies of the effects of caffeine on performance have used regular caffeine consumers who are deprived at test. Thus the reported effects of caffeine could be explained through reversal of caffeine withdrawal...
  28. ncbi request reprint Depressed mood and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid intake from fish: non-linear or confounded association?
    Katherine M Appleton
    School of Psychology, Queen s University of Belfast, 18 30 Malone Road, Belfast, BT9 5BP, UK
    Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol 42:100-4. 2007
    ....