David J Rogers

Summary

Affiliation: University of Oxford
Country: UK

Publications

  1. pmc Global data for ecology and epidemiology: a novel algorithm for temporal Fourier processing MODIS data
    Jorn P W Scharlemann
    Spatial Ecology and Epidemiology Group, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 3:e1408. 2008
  2. ncbi request reprint Using global maps to predict the risk of dengue in Europe
    David J Rogers
    University of Oxford, Department of Zoology, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PS, United Kingdom Electronic address
    Acta Trop 129:1-14. 2014
  3. doi request reprint Statistical models for spatially explicit biological data
    David J Rogers
    University of Oxford, Department of Zoology, Oxford OX1 3PS, UK
    Parasitology 139:1852-69. 2012
  4. pmc Satellite imagery in the study and forecast of malaria
    David J Rogers
    TALA Research Group, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PS, UK
    Nature 415:710-5. 2002
  5. ncbi request reprint Studying the global distribution of infectious diseases using GIS and RS
    David J Rogers
    Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PS, UK
    Nat Rev Microbiol 1:231-7. 2003
  6. ncbi request reprint A response to the aim of eradicating tsetse from Africa
    David J Rogers
    University of Oxford, Dept of Zoology, UK
    Trends Parasitol 18:534-6. 2002
  7. pmc Hot topic or hot air? Climate change and malaria resurgence in East African highlands
    Simon I Hay
    Dept of Zoology, University of Oxford, UK
    Trends Parasitol 18:530-4. 2002
  8. pmc Estimating the malaria risk of African mosquito movement by air travel
    Andrew J Tatem
    Spatial Ecology and Epidemiology Group, Tinbergen Building, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PS, UK
    Malar J 5:57. 2006
  9. pmc Climate variability and malaria epidemics in the highlands of East Africa
    Simon I Hay
    Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford, UK, OX1 3PS
    Trends Parasitol 21:52-3. 2005
  10. doi request reprint The arrival, establishment and spread of exotic diseases: patterns and predictions
    Sarah E Randolph
    Oxford Tick Research Group, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PS, UK
    Nat Rev Microbiol 8:361-71. 2010

Detail Information

Publications19

  1. pmc Global data for ecology and epidemiology: a novel algorithm for temporal Fourier processing MODIS data
    Jorn P W Scharlemann
    Spatial Ecology and Epidemiology Group, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 3:e1408. 2008
    ..Applying standard techniques to MODIS data can introduce errors of up to 30% in the estimation of the amplitudes and phases of the Fourier harmonics...
  2. ncbi request reprint Using global maps to predict the risk of dengue in Europe
    David J Rogers
    University of Oxford, Department of Zoology, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PS, United Kingdom Electronic address
    Acta Trop 129:1-14. 2014
    ....
  3. doi request reprint Statistical models for spatially explicit biological data
    David J Rogers
    University of Oxford, Department of Zoology, Oxford OX1 3PS, UK
    Parasitology 139:1852-69. 2012
    ..Cokriging techniques are unable to determine the biological significance or importance of such environmental data, because they are not designed to do so...
  4. pmc Satellite imagery in the study and forecast of malaria
    David J Rogers
    TALA Research Group, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PS, UK
    Nature 415:710-5. 2002
    ..Satellite sensor data promise the development of early-warning systems for diseases such as malaria, which kills between 1 and 2 million people each year...
  5. ncbi request reprint Studying the global distribution of infectious diseases using GIS and RS
    David J Rogers
    Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PS, UK
    Nat Rev Microbiol 1:231-7. 2003
    ..The direction, intensity or likelihood of its spread to new regions could then be predicted, potentially allowing disease early-warning systems to be developed...
  6. ncbi request reprint A response to the aim of eradicating tsetse from Africa
    David J Rogers
    University of Oxford, Dept of Zoology, UK
    Trends Parasitol 18:534-6. 2002
    ..In this article, the current aims of this project are questioned on historical, ecological, logistical and financial grounds...
  7. pmc Hot topic or hot air? Climate change and malaria resurgence in East African highlands
    Simon I Hay
    Dept of Zoology, University of Oxford, UK
    Trends Parasitol 18:530-4. 2002
    ..We find the widespread increase in resistance of the malaria parasite to drugs and the decrease in vector control activities to be more likely driving forces behind the malaria resurgence...
  8. pmc Estimating the malaria risk of African mosquito movement by air travel
    Andrew J Tatem
    Spatial Ecology and Epidemiology Group, Tinbergen Building, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PS, UK
    Malar J 5:57. 2006
    ..This prioritises areas at risk of further airport malaria and possible importation or reemergence of the disease...
  9. pmc Climate variability and malaria epidemics in the highlands of East Africa
    Simon I Hay
    Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford, UK, OX1 3PS
    Trends Parasitol 21:52-3. 2005
    ..If proven, this would be an interesting result but we believe that the methods used do not test the hypothesis suggested...
  10. doi request reprint The arrival, establishment and spread of exotic diseases: patterns and predictions
    Sarah E Randolph
    Oxford Tick Research Group, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PS, UK
    Nat Rev Microbiol 8:361-71. 2010
    ..Socioeconomic factors and nutritional status determine human exposure to disease and resistance to infection, respectively, so that disease incidence can vary independently of biological cycles...
  11. pmc Mapping bovine tuberculosis in Great Britain using environmental data
    G R William Wint
    Environmental Research Group Oxford, PO Box 346, OX1 3QE, Oxford, UK
    Trends Microbiol 10:441-4. 2002
    ....
  12. pmc A new algorithm quantifies the roles of wind and midge flight activity in the bluetongue epizootic in northwest Europe
    Luigi Sedda
    Spatial Ecology and Epidemiology Group, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 279:2354-62. 2012
    ..We argue that better understanding of the movement of infected insect vectors is an important ingredient in the management of future outbreaks of BT in Europe, and other devastating vector-borne diseases elsewhere...
  13. pmc Global traffic and disease vector dispersal
    Andrew J Tatem
    Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PS, United Kingdom
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103:6242-7. 2006
    ..In contrast, An. gambiae has rarely spread from Africa, which we suggest is partly due to the low volume of sea traffic from the continent and, until very recently, a European destination for most flights...
  14. pmc Climate change and the resurgence of malaria in the East African highlands
    Simon I Hay
    TALA Research Group, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PS, UK
    Nature 415:905-9. 2002
    ..A high degree of temporal and spatial variation in the climate of East Africa suggests further that claimed associations between local malaria resurgences and regional changes in climate are overly simplistic...
  15. ncbi request reprint Remotely sensed correlates of phylogeny: tick-borne flaviviruses
    Sarah E Randolph
    Department of Zoology, Oxford University, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PS, UK
    Exp Appl Acarol 28:231-7. 2002
    ..This will indicate the extent of key ecological drivers for specific evolutionary events, whose biological basis can then be explored in detail...
  16. pmc A Bayesian geostatistical Moran Curve model for estimating net changes of tsetse populations in Zambia
    Luigi Sedda
    Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 9:e96002. 2014
    ..It can also be applied to the case of sustainable harvesting of natural populations...
  17. doi request reprint The influence of the wind in the Schmallenberg virus outbreak in Europe
    Luigi Sedda
    Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, OX1 3PS, Oxford, United Kingdom
    Sci Rep 3:3361. 2013
    ..e. dusk) when these insects are known to be most active. The main difference with Bluetongue is the higher rate of spread of SBV, which has important implications for disease control...
  18. pmc Global warming and malaria: a call for accuracy
    Paul Reitera
    Institut Pasteur, Paris, France
    Lancet Infect Dis 4:323-4. 2004
  19. ncbi request reprint Climate change and the recent emergence of bluetongue in Europe
    Bethan V Purse
    Institute for Animal Health, Pirbright, UK
    Nat Rev Microbiol 3:171-81. 2005
    ..Understanding this sequence of events may help us predict the emergence of other vector-borne pathogens...