A F Read

Summary

Affiliation: University of Edinburgh
Country: UK

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint The ecology of genetically diverse infections
    A F Read
    Institute of Cell, Animal and Population Biology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JT, UK
    Science 292:1099-102. 2001
  2. pmc Mosquito appetite for blood is stimulated by Plasmodium chabaudi infections in themselves and their vertebrate hosts
    Heather M Ferguson
    Institute of Cell, Animal and Population Biology Ashworth Laboratories, King s Buildings University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, U, K, EH9 3JP
    Malar J 3:12. 2004
  3. pmc Competitive release of drug resistance following drug treatment of mixed Plasmodium chabaudi infections
    Jacobus C de Roode
    Institutes of Evolution, Immunology and Infection Research, School of Biological Sciences, University of Edinburgh, King s Buildings, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3 JT, Scotland, United Kingdom
    Malar J 3:33. 2004
  4. ncbi request reprint Evolution and immunology. The economics of immunity
    A F Read
    Institute for Cell, Animal and Population Biology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JT, UK
    Science 290:1104-5. 2000
  5. ncbi request reprint Parasite genetic diversity does not influence TNF-mediated effects on the virulence of primary rodent malaria infections
    G H Long
    Institutes of Evolution, Immunology and Infection Research, School of Biological Sciences, University of Edinburgh, King s Buildings, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JT, Scotland
    Parasitology 133:673-84. 2006
  6. pmc Selection for high and low virulence in the malaria parasite Plasmodium chabaudi
    M J Mackinnon
    Institute of Cell, Animal and Population Biology, University of Edinburgh, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 266:741-8. 1999
  7. ncbi request reprint Determinants of transmission success of individual clones from mixed-clone infections of the rodent malaria parasite, Plasmodium chabaudi
    L H Taylor
    Institute of Cell, Animal and Population Biology, University of Edinburgh, U K
    Int J Parasitol 28:719-25. 1998
  8. ncbi request reprint The influence of malaria parasite genetic diversity and anaemia on mosquito feeding and fecundity
    H M Ferguson
    Institute of Cell, Animal and Population Biology, University of Edinburgh, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JT, UK
    Parasitology 127:9-19. 2003
  9. ncbi request reprint Virulence in rodent malaria: host genotype by parasite genotype interactions
    M J Mackinnon
    Institute of Cell, Animal and Population Biology, University of Edinburgh, West Mains Road, Edinburgh, Scotland EH9 3JT, UK
    Infect Genet Evol 1:287-96. 2002
  10. ncbi request reprint Mosquito mortality and the evolution of malaria virulence
    H M Ferguson
    Institute of Cell, Animal and Population Biology, University of Edinburgh, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JT, United Kingdom
    Evolution 57:2792-804. 2003

Detail Information

Publications27

  1. ncbi request reprint The ecology of genetically diverse infections
    A F Read
    Institute of Cell, Animal and Population Biology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JT, UK
    Science 292:1099-102. 2001
    ..Indeed, much of the theory in this area is based on assumptions contradicted by the available data...
  2. pmc Mosquito appetite for blood is stimulated by Plasmodium chabaudi infections in themselves and their vertebrate hosts
    Heather M Ferguson
    Institute of Cell, Animal and Population Biology Ashworth Laboratories, King s Buildings University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, U, K, EH9 3JP
    Malar J 3:12. 2004
    ..The consequences of super-infection to parasite development are rarely investigated, but may have substantial epidemiological and evolutionary consequences...
  3. pmc Competitive release of drug resistance following drug treatment of mixed Plasmodium chabaudi infections
    Jacobus C de Roode
    Institutes of Evolution, Immunology and Infection Research, School of Biological Sciences, University of Edinburgh, King s Buildings, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3 JT, Scotland, United Kingdom
    Malar J 3:33. 2004
    ..Malaria infections are often genetically diverse, potentially leading to competition between co-infecting strains. Such competition is of key importance in the spread of drug resistance...
  4. ncbi request reprint Evolution and immunology. The economics of immunity
    A F Read
    Institute for Cell, Animal and Population Biology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JT, UK
    Science 290:1104-5. 2000
    ....
  5. ncbi request reprint Parasite genetic diversity does not influence TNF-mediated effects on the virulence of primary rodent malaria infections
    G H Long
    Institutes of Evolution, Immunology and Infection Research, School of Biological Sciences, University of Edinburgh, King s Buildings, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JT, Scotland
    Parasitology 133:673-84. 2006
    ..Thus, during P.c.c. infection, TNF-alpha is a key mediator of weight loss, independent of parasite load and across parasite genotypes...
  6. pmc Selection for high and low virulence in the malaria parasite Plasmodium chabaudi
    M J Mackinnon
    Institute of Cell, Animal and Population Biology, University of Edinburgh, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 266:741-8. 1999
    ..Thus, we found evidence of the factors assumed to drive evolution of increased virulence, but not those thought to counter this selection...
  7. ncbi request reprint Determinants of transmission success of individual clones from mixed-clone infections of the rodent malaria parasite, Plasmodium chabaudi
    L H Taylor
    Institute of Cell, Animal and Population Biology, University of Edinburgh, U K
    Int J Parasitol 28:719-25. 1998
    ..The two clones differed in competitive ability and the data suggest that interactions with the host immune system may be a major factor in determining transmission success from mixed-clone infections...
  8. ncbi request reprint The influence of malaria parasite genetic diversity and anaemia on mosquito feeding and fecundity
    H M Ferguson
    Institute of Cell, Animal and Population Biology, University of Edinburgh, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JT, UK
    Parasitology 127:9-19. 2003
    ..Thus mosquitoes may preferentially feed on hosts who will most impair their fecundity...
  9. ncbi request reprint Virulence in rodent malaria: host genotype by parasite genotype interactions
    M J Mackinnon
    Institute of Cell, Animal and Population Biology, University of Edinburgh, West Mains Road, Edinburgh, Scotland EH9 3JT, UK
    Infect Genet Evol 1:287-96. 2002
    ..Both mortality and morbidity-related factors might therefore influence the upper limit on virulence of malaria parasites...
  10. ncbi request reprint Mosquito mortality and the evolution of malaria virulence
    H M Ferguson
    Institute of Cell, Animal and Population Biology, University of Edinburgh, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JT, United Kingdom
    Evolution 57:2792-804. 2003
    ....
  11. ncbi request reprint Evolution of gametocyte sex ratios in malaria and related apicomplexan (protozoan) parasites
    S A West
    Institute of Cell, Animal and Population Biology, University of Edinburgh, EH9 3JT, Edinburgh, UK
    Trends Parasitol 17:525-31. 2001
    ..Moreover, inbreeding rates can be estimated from gametocyte sex ratios. The sex ratio is also an excellent model trait for testing the validity of important components of what is being marketed as 'Darwinian medicine'...
  12. ncbi request reprint Host-parasite interactions for virulence and resistance in a malaria model system
    K Grech
    Institutes of Evolution, Immunology and Infection Research, School of Biological Sciences, Ashworth Laboratories, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK
    J Evol Biol 19:1620-30. 2006
    ....
  13. ncbi request reprint The effect of parasite dose on disease severity in the rodent malaria Plasmodium chabaudi
    R Timms
    Institute of Cell, Animal and Population Biology, University of Edinburgh, Ashworth Laboratories
    Parasitology 123:1-11. 2001
    ..We discuss the possible efficacy of intervention strategies aimed at reducing human disease severity by reducing infective parasite dose...
  14. ncbi request reprint Chloroquine increases Plasmodium falciparum gametocytogenesis in vitro
    A Buckling
    Institute of Cell, Animal and Population Biology, Division of Biological Sciences, University of Edinburgh, UK
    Parasitology 118:339-46. 1999
    ..This was not, however, associated with chloroquine resistance. The epidemiological significance of these results is discussed...
  15. ncbi request reprint Rodent malaria parasites suffer from the presence of conspecific clones in three-clone Plasmodium chabaudi infections
    J C De Roode
    Institute of Cell, Animal and Population Biology, University of Edinburgh, Ashworth Laboratories, King s Buildings, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JT, Scotland, UK
    Parasitology 127:411-8. 2003
    ..These results suggest that in-host competition reduces both growth rate and probability of transmission for individual parasite clones...
  16. ncbi request reprint The effects of mosquito transmission and population bottlenecking on virulence, multiplication rate and rosetting in rodent malaria
    M J Mackinnon
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Edinburgh, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JT, UK
    Int J Parasitol 35:145-53. 2005
    ....
  17. ncbi request reprint The effect of chloroquine treatment on the infectivity of Plasmodium chabaudi gametocytes
    A G Buckling
    Institute of Cell, Animal and Population Biology, Division of Biological Sciences, University of Edinburgh, UK
    Int J Parasitol 29:619-25. 1999
    ..Infectivity was not influenced by either asexual parasitaemia, asexual density or anaemia. Parsimonious interpretations of the effect of chloroquine on gametocyte infectivity are discussed...
  18. ncbi request reprint Imperfect vaccines and the evolution of pathogen virulence
    S Gandon
    Institute of Cell, Animal and Population Biology, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JT, UK
    Nature 414:751-6. 2001
    ..These findings have policy implications for the development and use of vaccines that are not expected to provide full immunity, such as candidate vaccines for malaria...
  19. pmc Sex allocation and population structure in apicomplexan (protozoa) parasites
    S A West
    Institute of Cell, Animal and Population Biology, University of Edinburgh, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 267:257-63. 2000
    ..As predicted, data from four adeleorin species showed sex ratios not significantly different from 0.5...
  20. pmc The effect of partial host immunity on the transmission of malaria parasites
    A Buckling
    Institute of Cell, Animal and Population Biology, Division of Biological Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JT, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 268:2325-30. 2001
    ..The proportion of asexual parasites that produced gametocytes increased during the course of infection in both non-immunized and in immunized hosts, but immunity increased gametocyte production early in the infection...
  21. pmc The control of morph development in the parasitic nematode Strongyloides ratti
    S C Harvey
    Division of Biological Sciences, University of Edinburgh, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JT, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 267:2057-63. 2000
    ..These findings clarify the basis of the life cycle of S. ratti and demonstrate how such complex life cycles can result from a combination of simple developmental switches...
  22. ncbi request reprint The effects of host immunity on virulence-transmissibility relationships in the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium chabaudi
    M J Mackinnon
    Institute of Cell, Animal and Population Biology, University of Edinburgh, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JT, Scotland
    Parasitology 126:103-12. 2003
    ..These results support the basic assumption underlying our theory that predicts that anti-disease vaccines will select for higher virulence in those microparasites for which virulence is integrally linked to transmission...
  23. ncbi request reprint Spatial and discrimination learning in rodents infected with the nematode Strongyloides ratti
    V A Braithwaite
    Institute of Cell, Animal and Population Biology, University of Edinburgh, UK
    Parasitology 117:145-54. 1998
    ..vermiformis and H. polygyrus are discussed. Our results show that impaired learning and memory following parasitic infection is not a ubiquitous or at least easily replicated phenomenon...
  24. ncbi request reprint Sex ratios in the rodent malaria parasite, Plasmodium chabaudi
    S E Reece
    Institute of Cell, Animal and Population Biology, Ashworth Laboratories, West Mains Road, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 37T, UK
    Parasitology 127:419-25. 2003
    ..The mortality rate was significantly higher for female gametocytes, with an average half-life of 8 h for female gametocytes and 16 h for male gametocytes...
  25. ncbi request reprint Host immune status affects maturation time in two nematode species--but not as predicted by a simple life-history model
    M A Guinnee
    Institute of Cell, Animal and Population Biology, University of Edinburgh, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JT, UK
    Parasitology 127:507-12. 2003
    ..Thymus-dependent immunity had no effect on prematurational mortality. Results are discussed in relation to theoretical expectations and possible explanations for the observed patterns in parasite maturation...
  26. pmc Genetic and environmental determinants of malaria parasite virulence in mosquitoes
    H M Ferguson
    Institute of Cell, Animal and Population Biology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JT, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 269:1217-24. 2002
    ..Variation in the genetic and environmental determinants of virulence may explain conflicting accounts of Plasmodium pathogenicity to mosquitoes in the malaria literature...
  27. pmc Virulence evolution in response to vaccination: the case of malaria
    M J Mackinnon
    Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge CB2 1QP, UK
    Vaccine 26:C42-52. 2008
    ..We suggest that in disease contexts where wild-type parasites can be transmitted through vaccinated hosts, evolutionary outcomes need to be considered...