S E Randolph

Summary

Affiliation: University of Oxford
Country: UK

Publications

  1. pmc Climate change cannot explain the upsurge of tick-borne encephalitis in the Baltics
    Dana Sumilo
    Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 2:e500. 2007
  2. pmc A national case-control study identifies human socio-economic status and activities as risk factors for tick-borne encephalitis in Poland
    Pawel Stefanoff
    Department of Epidemiology, National Institute of Public Health National Institute of Hygiene, Warsaw, Poland
    PLoS ONE 7:e45511. 2012
  3. pmc Driving forces for changes in geographical distribution of Ixodes ricinus ticks in Europe
    Jolyon M Medlock
    Medical Entomology Group, MRA, Emergency Response Department, Health Protection Agency, Salisbury, UK
    Parasit Vectors 6:1. 2013
  4. ncbi request reprint Transmission of tick-borne pathogens between co-feeding ticks: Milan Labuda's enduring paradigm
    Sarah E Randolph
    Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK
    Ticks Tick Borne Dis 2:179-82. 2011
  5. doi request reprint Pangloss revisited: a critique of the dilution effect and the biodiversity-buffers-disease paradigm
    S E Randolph
    Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PS, UK
    Parasitology 139:847-63. 2012
  6. pmc Economic downturn results in tick-borne disease upsurge
    Elinor R Godfrey
    Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK
    Parasit Vectors 4:35. 2011
  7. pmc Variable spikes in tick-borne encephalitis incidence in 2006 independent of variable tick abundance but related to weather
    Sarah E Randolph
    Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PS, UK
    Parasit Vectors 1:44. 2008
  8. doi request reprint Tick-borne disease systems emerge from the shadows: the beauty lies in molecular detail, the message in epidemiology
    S E Randolph
    Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford, UK
    Parasitology 136:1403-13. 2009
  9. doi request reprint Tick-borne encephalitis incidence in Central and Eastern Europe: consequences of political transition
    Sarah E Randolph
    Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PS, UK
    Microbes Infect 10:209-16. 2008
  10. doi request reprint The arrival, establishment and spread of exotic diseases: patterns and predictions
    Sarah E Randolph
    Oxford Tick Research Group, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PS, UK
    Nat Rev Microbiol 8:361-71. 2010

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications42

  1. pmc Climate change cannot explain the upsurge of tick-borne encephalitis in the Baltics
    Dana Sumilo
    Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 2:e500. 2007
    ..For the first time, we analyse climate and TBE epidemiology at sufficiently fine spatial and temporal resolution to question this assumption...
  2. pmc A national case-control study identifies human socio-economic status and activities as risk factors for tick-borne encephalitis in Poland
    Pawel Stefanoff
    Department of Epidemiology, National Institute of Public Health National Institute of Hygiene, Warsaw, Poland
    PLoS ONE 7:e45511. 2012
    ..Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) is endemic to Europe and medically highly significant. This study, focused on Poland, investigated individual risk factors for TBE symptomatic infection...
  3. pmc Driving forces for changes in geographical distribution of Ixodes ricinus ticks in Europe
    Jolyon M Medlock
    Medical Entomology Group, MRA, Emergency Response Department, Health Protection Agency, Salisbury, UK
    Parasit Vectors 6:1. 2013
    ....
  4. ncbi request reprint Transmission of tick-borne pathogens between co-feeding ticks: Milan Labuda's enduring paradigm
    Sarah E Randolph
    Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK
    Ticks Tick Borne Dis 2:179-82. 2011
    ....
  5. doi request reprint Pangloss revisited: a critique of the dilution effect and the biodiversity-buffers-disease paradigm
    S E Randolph
    Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PS, UK
    Parasitology 139:847-63. 2012
    ..We warn against raising a straw man, an untenable argument easily dismantled and dismissed. The intrinsic value of protecting biodiversity and ecosystem function outweighs this questionable utilitarian justification...
  6. pmc Economic downturn results in tick-borne disease upsurge
    Elinor R Godfrey
    Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK
    Parasit Vectors 4:35. 2011
    ....
  7. pmc Variable spikes in tick-borne encephalitis incidence in 2006 independent of variable tick abundance but related to weather
    Sarah E Randolph
    Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PS, UK
    Parasit Vectors 1:44. 2008
    ..In this study we examine the possible causes of the sudden increase in disease: more abundant infected ticks and/or increased exposure due to human behaviour, both in response to the weather...
  8. doi request reprint Tick-borne disease systems emerge from the shadows: the beauty lies in molecular detail, the message in epidemiology
    S E Randolph
    Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford, UK
    Parasitology 136:1403-13. 2009
    ..Human activities, however, may be equally important in determining dynamic patterns of infection incidence in humans...
  9. doi request reprint Tick-borne encephalitis incidence in Central and Eastern Europe: consequences of political transition
    Sarah E Randolph
    Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PS, UK
    Microbes Infect 10:209-16. 2008
    ..Many of these stem from the political transition with the end of Soviet rule...
  10. doi request reprint The arrival, establishment and spread of exotic diseases: patterns and predictions
    Sarah E Randolph
    Oxford Tick Research Group, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PS, UK
    Nat Rev Microbiol 8:361-71. 2010
    ..Socioeconomic factors and nutritional status determine human exposure to disease and resistance to infection, respectively, so that disease incidence can vary independently of biological cycles...
  11. doi request reprint To what extent has climate change contributed to the recent epidemiology of tick-borne diseases?
    Sarah E Randolph
    Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PS, UK
    Vet Parasitol 167:92-4. 2010
    ..This new perspective may also help explain the epidemiology of Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever around the eastern Mediterranean region, including the current exceptional epidemic in Turkey...
  12. ncbi request reprint Human activities predominate in determining changing incidence of tick-borne encephalitis in Europe
    S E Randolph
    Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PS, United Kingdom
    Euro Surveill 15:24-31. 2010
    ....
  13. doi request reprint Tick-borne encephalitis virus, ticks and humans: short-term and long-term dynamics
    Sarah E Randolph
    Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK
    Curr Opin Infect Dis 21:462-7. 2008
    ..It is the most important vector-borne disease of humans in Europe, for which excellent long-term data allow robust quantitative analyses...
  14. ncbi request reprint Incidence from coincidence: patterns of tick infestations on rodents facilitate transmission of tick-borne encephalitis virus
    S E Randolph
    Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, UK
    Parasitology 118:177-86. 1999
    ..This identifies the particular climatic factors that permit such patterns of tick seasonal dynamics as the primary predictors for the focal distribution of TBE...
  15. ncbi request reprint Natural Lyme disease cycles maintained via sheep by co-feeding ticks
    N H Ogden
    Department of Zoology, University of Oxford
    Parasitology 115:591-9. 1997
    ..burgdorferi, but they can transmit localized infections from infected to uninfected ticks co-feeding at the same site on the sheep's body...
  16. pmc Fragile transmission cycles of tick-borne encephalitis virus may be disrupted by predicted climate change
    S E Randolph
    Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 267:1741-4. 2000
    ..The observed marked increase in incidence of tick-borne encephalitis in most parts of Europe since 1993 may be due to non-biological causes, such as political and sociological changes...
  17. ncbi request reprint A generic population model for the African tick Rhipicephalus appendiculatus
    S E Randolph
    Department of Zoology, University of Oxford
    Parasitology 115:265-79. 1997
    ..The model is potentially applicable to other species of ticks, both tropical and temperate, to predict tick abundance and seasonality as risk factors for tick-borne diseases...
  18. ncbi request reprint Seasonal synchrony: the key to tick-borne encephalitis foci identified by satellite data
    S E Randolph
    Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, UK
    Parasitology 121:15-23. 2000
    ..It is proposed that such a seasonal temperature profile may cause unfed larvae to pass the winter in quiescence, from which they emerge synchronously with nymphs in the spring...
  19. ncbi request reprint Tick ecology: processes and patterns behind the epidemiological risk posed by ixodid ticks as vectors
    S E Randolph
    Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PS, UK
    Parasitology 129:S37-65. 2004
    ..Temperate and tropical patterns will be illustrated with reference mostly to Ixodes ricinus and Rhipicephalus appendiculatus, respectively...
  20. ncbi request reprint The global spread of malaria in a future, warmer world
    D J Rogers
    Trypanosomiasis and Land Use in Africa Research Group, Oxford Tick Research Group, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PS, UK
    Science 289:1763-6. 2000
    ..These results were applied to future climate scenarios to predict future distributions, which showed remarkably few changes, even under the most extreme scenarios...
  21. pmc Serum complement sensitivity as a key factor in Lyme disease ecology
    K Kurtenbach
    Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, United Kingdom
    Infect Immun 66:1248-51. 1998
    ..The species-specific pattern of viability and/or lysis is highly consistent with the pattern of reservoir competence of hosts for B. burgdorferi sensu lato, suggesting a key role of complement in the global ecology of Lyme borreliosis...
  22. pmc Differential transmission of the genospecies of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato by game birds and small rodents in England
    K Kurtenbach
    Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, United Kingdom
    Appl Environ Microbiol 64:1169-74. 1998
    ..Wildlife management may have an influence on the relative risk of different clinical forms of Lyme borreliosis...
  23. doi request reprint Socio-economic factors in the differential upsurge of tick-borne encephalitis in Central and Eastern Europe
    Dana Sumilo
    Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PS, UK
    Rev Med Virol 18:81-95. 2008
    ..533 and 0.716, respectively)...
  24. ncbi request reprint Dynamics of tick-borne disease systems: minor role of recent climate change
    S E Randolph
    Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom
    Rev Sci Tech 27:367-81. 2008
    ..The same principle may apply to the periodic epidemics of Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever...
  25. ncbi request reprint Testosterone depresses innate and acquired resistance to ticks in natural rodent hosts: a force for aggregated distributions of parasites
    V L Hughes
    Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, UK
    J Parasitol 87:49-54. 2001
    ..The lowest innate and acquired resistance to tick feeding occurs in that fraction of the host population, i.e., sexually active males, most actively involved in the transmission of both Babesia microti and Borrelia burgdorferi s.l...
  26. pmc The shifting landscape of tick-borne zoonoses: tick-borne encephalitis and Lyme borreliosis in Europe
    S E Randolph
    Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PS, UK
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 356:1045-56. 2001
    ..This probably accounts for a genuine emergence of LB, with its high potential transmission rate, in both the USA and Europe, although the rate of emergence has been exaggerated by improved surveillance and diagnosis...
  27. ncbi request reprint Testosterone increases the transmission potential of tick-borne parasites
    V L Hughes
    Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, UK
    Parasitology 123:365-71. 2001
    ..It is argued that testosterone helps to generate the observed aggregated distributions of parasites amongst their hosts, which also enhances parasite persistence...
  28. pmc Climate change and the resurgence of malaria in the East African highlands
    Simon I Hay
    TALA Research Group, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PS, UK
    Nature 415:905-9. 2002
    ..A high degree of temporal and spatial variation in the climate of East Africa suggests further that claimed associations between local malaria resurgences and regional changes in climate are overly simplistic...
  29. pmc Satellite imagery in the study and forecast of malaria
    David J Rogers
    TALA Research Group, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PS, UK
    Nature 415:710-5. 2002
    ..Satellite sensor data promise the development of early-warning systems for diseases such as malaria, which kills between 1 and 2 million people each year...
  30. pmc Hot topic or hot air? Climate change and malaria resurgence in East African highlands
    Simon I Hay
    Dept of Zoology, University of Oxford, UK
    Trends Parasitol 18:530-4. 2002
    ..We find the widespread increase in resistance of the malaria parasite to drugs and the decrease in vector control activities to be more likely driving forces behind the malaria resurgence...
  31. ncbi request reprint An empirical quantitative framework for the seasonal population dynamics of the tick Ixodes ricinus
    Sarah E Randolph
    Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PS, UK
    Int J Parasitol 32:979-89. 2002
    ..Questing tick population dynamics are determined by seasonal patterns of tick behaviour, host-contact rates and mortality rates, superimposed on a basal phenology that is much less complex than has hitherto been portrayed...
  32. ncbi request reprint Evidence that climate change has caused 'emergence' of tick-borne diseases in Europe?
    Sarah E Randolph
    Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, UK
    Int J Med Microbiol 293:5-15. 2004
    ....
  33. ncbi request reprint Studying the global distribution of infectious diseases using GIS and RS
    David J Rogers
    Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PS, UK
    Nat Rev Microbiol 1:231-7. 2003
    ..The direction, intensity or likelihood of its spread to new regions could then be predicted, potentially allowing disease early-warning systems to be developed...
  34. ncbi request reprint A response to the aim of eradicating tsetse from Africa
    David J Rogers
    University of Oxford, Dept of Zoology, UK
    Trends Parasitol 18:534-6. 2002
    ..In this article, the current aims of this project are questioned on historical, ecological, logistical and financial grounds...
  35. pmc Climate variability and malaria epidemics in the highlands of East Africa
    Simon I Hay
    Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford, UK, OX1 3PS
    Trends Parasitol 21:52-3. 2005
    ..If proven, this would be an interesting result but we believe that the methods used do not test the hypothesis suggested...
  36. ncbi request reprint Remotely sensed correlates of phylogeny: tick-borne flaviviruses
    Sarah E Randolph
    Department of Zoology, Oxford University, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PS, UK
    Exp Appl Acarol 28:231-7. 2002
    ..This will indicate the extent of key ecological drivers for specific evolutionary events, whose biological basis can then be explored in detail...
  37. doi request reprint Trends in ixodid tick abundance and distribution in Great Britain
    J P W Scharlemann
    Oxford Tick Research Group, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK
    Med Vet Entomol 22:238-47. 2008
    ..Tick infestation prevalence increased over time on all grouse moors and 77% of MoD estates and decreased at six locations...
  38. pmc Mapping bovine tuberculosis in Great Britain using environmental data
    G R William Wint
    Environmental Research Group Oxford, PO Box 346, OX1 3QE, Oxford, UK
    Trends Microbiol 10:441-4. 2002
    ....
  39. doi request reprint Behavioural responses to perceived risk of tick-borne encephalitis: vaccination and avoidance in the Baltics and Slovenia
    Dana Sumilo
    Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford, UK
    Vaccine 26:2580-8. 2008
    ..We conclude that risk avoidance through changing human behaviour has driven incidence-dependent decreases in TBE infection, but targeted vaccination campaigns could provide more secure protection...
  40. ncbi request reprint Walking by Ixodes ricinus ticks: intrinsic and extrinsic factors determine the attraction of moisture or host odour
    Emily Crooks
    Department of Zoology, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PS, UK
    J Exp Biol 209:2138-42. 2006
    ..It seems that, under certain circumstances, ticks of this ambushing species will move short distances towards host odour...
  41. pmc Global warming and malaria: a call for accuracy
    Paul Reitera
    Institut Pasteur, Paris, France
    Lancet Infect Dis 4:323-4. 2004
  42. pmc Differential survival of Lyme borreliosis spirochetes in ticks that feed on birds
    Klaus Kurtenbach
    Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, St Mary s Campus, London W2 1PG, United Kingdom
    Infect Immun 70:5893-5. 2002
    ..A pattern of differential survival of the spirochetes in feeding ticks was observed. The result is consistent with the concept of selective transmission of Lyme borreliosis spirochetes...