Todd C Rae

Summary

Affiliation: University of Durham
Country: UK

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Mosaic evolution in the origin of the Hominoidea
    T C Rae
    Evolutionary Anthropology Research Group, Department of Anthropology, University of Durham, UK
    Folia Primatol (Basel) 70:125-35. 1999
  2. ncbi request reprint Isometric scaling of maxillary sinus volume in hominoids
    T C Rae
    Evolutionary Anthropology Research Group, Dept of Anthropology, University of Durham, 43 Old Elvet, Durham, DH1 3HN, UK
    J Hum Evol 38:411-23. 2000
  3. ncbi request reprint Ancestral loss of the maxillary sinus in Old World monkeys and independent acquisition in Macaca
    Todd C Rae
    Evolutionary Anthropology Research Group, Department of Anthropology, University of Durham, 43 Old Elvet, Durham DH1 3HN, UK
    Am J Phys Anthropol 117:293-6. 2002
  4. ncbi request reprint Clinal variation of maxillary sinus volume in Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata)
    Todd C Rae
    Evolutionary Anthropology Research Group, Department of Anthropology, University of Durham, UK
    Am J Primatol 59:153-8. 2003
  5. ncbi request reprint The term "lateral recess" and craniofacial pneumatization in old world monkeys (Mammalia, Primates, Cercopithecoidea)
    Todd C Rae
    Evolutionary Anthropology Research Group, Department of Anthropology, University of Durham, Durham, DH1 3HN, United Kingdom
    J Morphol 258:193-9. 2003
  6. ncbi request reprint Miocene hominoid craniofacial morphology and the emergence of great apes
    Todd C Rae
    Evolutionary Anthropology Research Group, Department of Anthropology, University of Durham, Durham DH1 3HN, UK
    Ann Anat 186:417-21. 2004
  7. pmc Developmental response to cold stress in cranial morphology of Rattus: implications for the interpretation of climatic adaptation in fossil hominins
    Todd C Rae
    Evolutionary Anthropology Research Group, Department of Anthropology, University of Durham, 43 Old Elvet, Durham DH1 3HN, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 273:2605-10. 2006
  8. ncbi request reprint Paranasal pneumatization in extant and fossil Cercopithecoidea
    Todd C Rae
    Evolutionary Anthropology Research Group, Department of Anthropology, Durham University, 43 Old Elvet, Durham DH1 3HN, UK
    J Hum Evol 54:279-86. 2008
  9. doi request reprint Independence of biomechanical forces and craniofacial pneumatization in Cebus
    Todd C Rae
    Department of Anthropology, Evolutionary Anthropology Research Group, Durham University, Durham DH1 3HN, United Kingdom
    Anat Rec (Hoboken) 291:1414-9. 2008

Detail Information

Publications9

  1. ncbi request reprint Mosaic evolution in the origin of the Hominoidea
    T C Rae
    Evolutionary Anthropology Research Group, Department of Anthropology, University of Durham, UK
    Folia Primatol (Basel) 70:125-35. 1999
    ..These results suggest that the initial divergence of hominoids involved selection for an ape-like face, and was not driven by an adaptive shift to below-branch locomotion...
  2. ncbi request reprint Isometric scaling of maxillary sinus volume in hominoids
    T C Rae
    Evolutionary Anthropology Research Group, Dept of Anthropology, University of Durham, 43 Old Elvet, Durham, DH1 3HN, UK
    J Hum Evol 38:411-23. 2000
    ..This result, in turn, has implications for the phylogenetic placement of fossil taxa and highlights the need for the careful delineation of character states in studies of hominoid systematics...
  3. ncbi request reprint Ancestral loss of the maxillary sinus in Old World monkeys and independent acquisition in Macaca
    Todd C Rae
    Evolutionary Anthropology Research Group, Department of Anthropology, University of Durham, 43 Old Elvet, Durham DH1 3HN, UK
    Am J Phys Anthropol 117:293-6. 2002
    ..The results suggest that the maxillary sinus found in the genus Macaca is not homologous with that of other eutherians, which may provide insights into the origin and function (if any) of the paranasal pneumatizations...
  4. ncbi request reprint Clinal variation of maxillary sinus volume in Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata)
    Todd C Rae
    Evolutionary Anthropology Research Group, Department of Anthropology, University of Durham, UK
    Am J Primatol 59:153-8. 2003
    ..The sinus shrinks as the nasal cavity expands, due to an increased need to condition inspired air in colder climates. This in turn suggests that the sinus itself does not contribute significantly to upper respiratory function...
  5. ncbi request reprint The term "lateral recess" and craniofacial pneumatization in old world monkeys (Mammalia, Primates, Cercopithecoidea)
    Todd C Rae
    Evolutionary Anthropology Research Group, Department of Anthropology, University of Durham, Durham, DH1 3HN, United Kingdom
    J Morphol 258:193-9. 2003
    ....
  6. ncbi request reprint Miocene hominoid craniofacial morphology and the emergence of great apes
    Todd C Rae
    Evolutionary Anthropology Research Group, Department of Anthropology, University of Durham, Durham DH1 3HN, UK
    Ann Anat 186:417-21. 2004
    ....
  7. pmc Developmental response to cold stress in cranial morphology of Rattus: implications for the interpretation of climatic adaptation in fossil hominins
    Todd C Rae
    Evolutionary Anthropology Research Group, Department of Anthropology, University of Durham, 43 Old Elvet, Durham DH1 3HN, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 273:2605-10. 2006
    ..These changes are consistent with comparative studies of temperate climate primates, but contradict previous interpretations of cranial morphology of Pleistocene Hominini...
  8. ncbi request reprint Paranasal pneumatization in extant and fossil Cercopithecoidea
    Todd C Rae
    Evolutionary Anthropology Research Group, Department of Anthropology, Durham University, 43 Old Elvet, Durham DH1 3HN, UK
    J Hum Evol 54:279-86. 2008
    ..Thus, paranasal pneumatization has reemerged a minimum of two and possibly three times in cercopithecoids. The results suggest that maxillary sinus absence in cercopithecoids is due to suppression, rather than complete loss...
  9. doi request reprint Independence of biomechanical forces and craniofacial pneumatization in Cebus
    Todd C Rae
    Department of Anthropology, Evolutionary Anthropology Research Group, Durham University, Durham DH1 3HN, United Kingdom
    Anat Rec (Hoboken) 291:1414-9. 2008
    ..This result suggests that it is unlikely that the maxillary sinus performs any function in relation to masticatory stress; other factors must be responsible for the variation in sinus volume among primates...