D J Obbard

Summary

Affiliation: University of Edinburgh
Country: UK

Publications

  1. pmc Molecular evolution and phylogenetics of rodent malaria parasites
    Ricardo S Ramiro
    Institute of Evolutionary Biology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom
    BMC Evol Biol 12:219. 2012
  2. pmc Immune genes undergo more adaptive evolution than non-immune system genes in Daphnia pulex
    Seanna J McTaggart
    Institute of Evolutionary Biology, School of Biological Sciences, Ashworth Laboratories University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JT, UK
    BMC Evol Biol 12:63. 2012
  3. pmc Estimating divergence dates and substitution rates in the Drosophila phylogeny
    Darren J Obbard
    Institute of Evolutionary Biology, and Centre for Infection Immunity and Evolution, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom
    Mol Biol Evol 29:3459-73. 2012
  4. pmc Alternative splicing of the Anopheles gambiae Dscam gene in diverse Plasmodium falciparum infections
    Paul H Smith
    Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Centre for Immunity, Infection and Evolution, School of Biological Sciences, University of Edinburgh, EH93JT Edinburgh, UK
    Malar J 10:156. 2011
  5. pmc Recent and recurrent selective sweeps of the antiviral RNAi gene Argonaute-2 in three species of Drosophila
    Darren J Obbard
    Institute of Evolutionary Biology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK
    Mol Biol Evol 28:1043-56. 2011
  6. pmc Quantifying adaptive evolution in the Drosophila immune system
    Darren J Obbard
    Institute of Evolutionary Biology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK
    PLoS Genet 5:e1000698. 2009
  7. pmc Inferring selection in the Anopheles gambiae species complex: an example from immune-related serine protease inhibitors
    Darren J Obbard
    Institute of Evolutionary Biology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK
    Malar J 8:117. 2009
  8. pmc The evolution of RNAi as a defence against viruses and transposable elements
    Darren J Obbard
    Institute of Evolutionary Biology, School of Biological Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Ashworth Laboratories, King s Buildings, Edinburgh EH9 3JT, UK
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 364:99-115. 2009
  9. pmc The evolution of TEP1, an exceptionally polymorphic immunity gene in Anopheles gambiae
    Darren J Obbard
    Institute of Evolutionary Biology, School of Biological Sciences, University of Edinburgh, West Mains Rd, Edinburgh EH9 3JT, UK
    BMC Evol Biol 8:274. 2008
  10. ncbi Population genetics of Plasmodium resistance genes in Anopheles gambiae: no evidence for strong selection
    D J Obbard
    Institute of Evolutionary Biology, University of Edinburgh, Kings Buildings, West Mains Road, Edinburgh, UK
    Mol Ecol 16:3497-510. 2007

Detail Information

Publications18

  1. pmc Molecular evolution and phylogenetics of rodent malaria parasites
    Ricardo S Ramiro
    Institute of Evolutionary Biology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom
    BMC Evol Biol 12:219. 2012
    ....
  2. pmc Immune genes undergo more adaptive evolution than non-immune system genes in Daphnia pulex
    Seanna J McTaggart
    Institute of Evolutionary Biology, School of Biological Sciences, Ashworth Laboratories University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JT, UK
    BMC Evol Biol 12:63. 2012
    ..In this study, we used a population genetic approach to test this hypothesis by comparing DNA sequences of 30 putative immune system genes in the crustacean Daphnia pulex with 24 non-immune system genes...
  3. pmc Estimating divergence dates and substitution rates in the Drosophila phylogeny
    Darren J Obbard
    Institute of Evolutionary Biology, and Centre for Infection Immunity and Evolution, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom
    Mol Biol Evol 29:3459-73. 2012
    ..As either source of error will bias estimates of divergence time, we suggest mutation rate estimates be used until better models are available...
  4. pmc Alternative splicing of the Anopheles gambiae Dscam gene in diverse Plasmodium falciparum infections
    Paul H Smith
    Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Centre for Immunity, Infection and Evolution, School of Biological Sciences, University of Edinburgh, EH93JT Edinburgh, UK
    Malar J 10:156. 2011
    ..g. between bacteria and Plasmodium or between Plasmodium berghei and Plasmodium falciparum). Here, data are presented from the first study of Dscam expression in response to genetic diversity within a parasite species...
  5. pmc Recent and recurrent selective sweeps of the antiviral RNAi gene Argonaute-2 in three species of Drosophila
    Darren J Obbard
    Institute of Evolutionary Biology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK
    Mol Biol Evol 28:1043-56. 2011
    ..In summary, our results show that selection by parasites can consistently target the same genes in multiple species, resulting in areas of the genome that have markedly reduced genetic diversity...
  6. pmc Quantifying adaptive evolution in the Drosophila immune system
    Darren J Obbard
    Institute of Evolutionary Biology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK
    PLoS Genet 5:e1000698. 2009
    ....
  7. pmc Inferring selection in the Anopheles gambiae species complex: an example from immune-related serine protease inhibitors
    Darren J Obbard
    Institute of Evolutionary Biology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK
    Malar J 8:117. 2009
    ..However, there is little conclusive evidence that any of these mosquito genes evolve rapidly, or show other signatures of adaptive evolution...
  8. pmc The evolution of RNAi as a defence against viruses and transposable elements
    Darren J Obbard
    Institute of Evolutionary Biology, School of Biological Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Ashworth Laboratories, King s Buildings, Edinburgh EH9 3JT, UK
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 364:99-115. 2009
    ..Over longer time scales, key RNAi genes are repeatedly duplicated or lost across the metazoan phylogeny, with important implications for RNAi as an immune defence...
  9. pmc The evolution of TEP1, an exceptionally polymorphic immunity gene in Anopheles gambiae
    Darren J Obbard
    Institute of Evolutionary Biology, School of Biological Sciences, University of Edinburgh, West Mains Rd, Edinburgh EH9 3JT, UK
    BMC Evol Biol 8:274. 2008
    ..We studied whether TEP1 is a case of an ancient balanced polymorphism in an animal immune system...
  10. ncbi Population genetics of Plasmodium resistance genes in Anopheles gambiae: no evidence for strong selection
    D J Obbard
    Institute of Evolutionary Biology, University of Edinburgh, Kings Buildings, West Mains Road, Edinburgh, UK
    Mol Ecol 16:3497-510. 2007
    ....
  11. ncbi Hybridization, polyploidy, and the evolution of sexual systems in Mercurialis (Euphorbiaceae)
    Darren J Obbard
    Department of Plant Sciences, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3RB, United Kingdom
    Evolution 60:1801-15. 2006
    ..huetii and monoecious tetraploid M. annua, an event that brought together the genes for specialist males with those for hermaphrodites...
  12. ncbi Simple allelic-phenotype diversity and differentiation statistics for allopolyploids
    D J Obbard
    Department of Plant Sciences, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3RB, UK
    Heredity (Edinb) 97:296-303. 2006
    ....
  13. ncbi Sexual systems and population genetic structure in an annual plant: testing the metapopulation model
    Darren J Obbard
    Department of Plant Sciences, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3RB, United Kingdom
    Am Nat 167:354-66. 2006
    ..In contrast, regional diversity in M. annua appears to be primarily a product of postglacial range expansion from two refugia in the eastern and western Mediterranean Basin...
  14. ncbi Natural selection drives extremely rapid evolution in antiviral RNAi genes
    Darren J Obbard
    Institute of Evolutionary Biology, University of Edinburgh, Kings Buildings, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JT, United Kingdom
    Curr Biol 16:580-5. 2006
    ..This is a signature of host-pathogen arms races and implies that the ancient battle between RNA viruses and host antiviral RNAi genes is active and significant in shaping RNAi function...
  15. doi RNA interference: endogenous siRNAs derived from transposable elements
    Darren J Obbard
    Institute of Evolutionary Biology, University of Edinburgh, Kings Buildings, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JT, UK
    Curr Biol 18:R561-3. 2008
    ..Now, deep sequencing of short RNAs from somatic tissue and cell culture has identified a novel class of endogenous siRNAs that may have a similar role in the soma...
  16. ncbi The recent spread of a vertically transmitted virus through populations of Drosophila melanogaster
    Jennifer A Carpenter
    Institute of Evolutionary Biology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JT, Scotland, UK
    Mol Ecol 16:3947-54. 2007
    ..This is surprising for a vertically transmitted pathogen that has a similar migration rate to its host. We suggest that the low structure in the viral populations can be explained by the smaller effective population size of the virus...
  17. pmc Sigma viruses from three species of Drosophila form a major new clade in the rhabdovirus phylogeny
    Ben Longdon
    Institute of Evolutionary Biology, University of Edinburgh, Ashworth Laboratories, Kings Buildings, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JT, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 277:35-44. 2010
    ..Our data suggest that the bias towards research into plants and vertebrates means that much of the diversity of rhabdoviruses has been missed, and rhabdoviruses may be common pathogens of insects...
  18. pmc The age and evolution of an antiviral resistance mutation in Drosophila melanogaster
    Jenny Bangham
    School of Biological Sciences, Institute of Evolutionary Biology, The University of Edinburgh, Ashworth Laboratories, The King s Buildings, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JT, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 274:2027-34. 2007
    ..We find that the ref(2)P resistance mutation is considerably older than the recent spread of this viral strain and suggest that--possibly because it is recessive--the initial spread of the resistance mutation was very slow...