R Norbury

Summary

Affiliation: University of Oxford
Country: UK

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Increased neural response to fear in patients recovered from depression: a 3T functional magnetic resonance imaging study
    R Norbury
    Psychopharmacology Research Unit, University of Oxford, Department of Psychiatry, Oxford, UK
    Psychol Med 40:425-32. 2010
  2. doi request reprint Short-term antidepressant treatment modulates amygdala response to happy faces
    Ray Norbury
    Psychopharmacology Research Unit PPRU, Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford, Warneford Hospital, Neurosciences Building, Headington, Oxford, OX3 7JX, UK
    Psychopharmacology (Berl) 206:197-204. 2009
  3. ncbi request reprint The effects of reboxetine on emotional processing in healthy volunteers: an fMRI study
    R Norbury
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford, Warneford Hospital, Headington, Oxford, UK
    Mol Psychiatry 13:1011-20. 2008
  4. ncbi request reprint Estrogen therapy and brain muscarinic receptor density in healthy females: a SPET study
    Ray Norbury
    Psychopharmacology and Emotion Research Laboratory, University of Oxford, UK
    Horm Behav 51:249-57. 2007
  5. ncbi request reprint In vivo imaging of muscarinic receptors in the aging female brain with (R,R)[123I]-I-QNB and single photon emission tomography
    R Norbury
    Institute of Psychiatry, King s College, London, UK
    Exp Gerontol 40:137-45. 2005
  6. pmc Short-term SSRI treatment normalises amygdala hyperactivity in depressed patients
    B R Godlewska
    University Department of Psychiatry, Warneford Hospital, Oxford, UK
    Psychol Med 42:2609-17. 2012
  7. ncbi request reprint Long-term estrogen therapy and 5-HT(2A) receptor binding in postmenopausal women; a single photon emission tomography (SPET) study
    J Compton
    Department of Psychological Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry, Denmark Hill, London SE5 8AF, UK
    Horm Behav 53:61-8. 2008
  8. doi request reprint Neural response to angry and disgusted facial expressions in bulimia nervosa
    F Ashworth
    Oxford Doctoral Course in Clinical Psychology, University of Oxford, UK
    Psychol Med 41:2375-84. 2011
  9. ncbi request reprint SPET imaging of central muscarinic receptors with (R,R)[123I]-I-QNB: methodological considerations
    R Norbury
    Psychological Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry, Denmark Hill, London, United Kingdom
    Nucl Med Biol 31:583-90. 2004
  10. doi request reprint Short-term antidepressant administration reduces negative self-referential processing in the medial prefrontal cortex in subjects at risk for depression
    M Di Simplicio
    University Department of Psychiatry, Warneford Hospital, Oxford, UK
    Mol Psychiatry 17:503-10. 2012

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications18

  1. doi request reprint Increased neural response to fear in patients recovered from depression: a 3T functional magnetic resonance imaging study
    R Norbury
    Psychopharmacology Research Unit, University of Oxford, Department of Psychiatry, Oxford, UK
    Psychol Med 40:425-32. 2010
    ..Whether these changes persist in unmedicated recovered patients is unclear...
  2. doi request reprint Short-term antidepressant treatment modulates amygdala response to happy faces
    Ray Norbury
    Psychopharmacology Research Unit PPRU, Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford, Warneford Hospital, Neurosciences Building, Headington, Oxford, OX3 7JX, UK
    Psychopharmacology (Berl) 206:197-204. 2009
    ..These early effects of antidepressants may be an important component in the therapeutic effects of antidepressant treatment in patients with depression and anxiety...
  3. ncbi request reprint The effects of reboxetine on emotional processing in healthy volunteers: an fMRI study
    R Norbury
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford, Warneford Hospital, Headington, Oxford, UK
    Mol Psychiatry 13:1011-20. 2008
    ..Such adaptations in the neural processing of emotional information support the hypothesis that antidepressants have early effects on emotional processing in a manner which would be expected to reverse negative biases in depression...
  4. ncbi request reprint Estrogen therapy and brain muscarinic receptor density in healthy females: a SPET study
    Ray Norbury
    Psychopharmacology and Emotion Research Laboratory, University of Oxford, UK
    Horm Behav 51:249-57. 2007
    ..In healthy postmenopausal women use of long-term ET is associated with reduced age-related differences in muscarinic receptor binding, and this may be related to serum estradiol levels...
  5. ncbi request reprint In vivo imaging of muscarinic receptors in the aging female brain with (R,R)[123I]-I-QNB and single photon emission tomography
    R Norbury
    Institute of Psychiatry, King s College, London, UK
    Exp Gerontol 40:137-45. 2005
    ..Thus, in this population of healthy women, there was an age-related reduction in muscarinic receptor density. This may contribute to age-related differences in cognitive function and risk for Alzheimer's disease...
  6. pmc Short-term SSRI treatment normalises amygdala hyperactivity in depressed patients
    B R Godlewska
    University Department of Psychiatry, Warneford Hospital, Oxford, UK
    Psychol Med 42:2609-17. 2012
    ..However, it is not clear if these effects occur before, or as a consequence of, changes in clinical state...
  7. ncbi request reprint Long-term estrogen therapy and 5-HT(2A) receptor binding in postmenopausal women; a single photon emission tomography (SPET) study
    J Compton
    Department of Psychological Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry, Denmark Hill, London SE5 8AF, UK
    Horm Behav 53:61-8. 2008
    ..This may reflect increased activity within the serotonergic pathway leading to down-regulation of post-synaptic receptor. Also, increased availability of the 5-HT(2A) receptor in hippocampus is associated with poorer memory function...
  8. doi request reprint Neural response to angry and disgusted facial expressions in bulimia nervosa
    F Ashworth
    Oxford Doctoral Course in Clinical Psychology, University of Oxford, UK
    Psychol Med 41:2375-84. 2011
    ..Disgust and anger are of particular theoretical and clinical interest. The current study investigated the neural response to facial expressions of anger and disgust in bulimia nervosa (BN)...
  9. ncbi request reprint SPET imaging of central muscarinic receptors with (R,R)[123I]-I-QNB: methodological considerations
    R Norbury
    Psychological Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry, Denmark Hill, London, United Kingdom
    Nucl Med Biol 31:583-90. 2004
    ..Here we show that, for this radiotracer, normalizing to a region of negligible specific binding (cerebellum) significantly improves sensitivity when compared to global normalization...
  10. doi request reprint Short-term antidepressant administration reduces negative self-referential processing in the medial prefrontal cortex in subjects at risk for depression
    M Di Simplicio
    University Department of Psychiatry, Warneford Hospital, Oxford, UK
    Mol Psychiatry 17:503-10. 2012
    ....
  11. doi request reprint Neural correlates of the processing of self-referent emotional information in bulimia nervosa
    A Pringle
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom
    Neuropsychologia 49:3272-8. 2011
    ..Different patterns of neural activation between patients and controls may be the result of either habituation to personally relevant negative self beliefs or of emotional blunting in patients...
  12. doi request reprint The effect of the serotonin transporter polymorphism (5-HTTLPR) on amygdala function: a meta-analysis
    S E Murphy
    Department of Psychiatry, Warneford Hospital, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK
    Mol Psychiatry 18:512-20. 2013
    ....
  13. pmc Lack of effect of citalopram on magnetic resonance spectroscopy measures of glutamate and glutamine in frontal cortex of healthy volunteers
    M J Taylor
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford, Warneford Hospital, Oxford, United Kingdom
    J Psychopharmacol 24:1217-21. 2010
    ..This supports the potential for MRS in assessing neuroanatomically specific serotonin-glutamate interactions in the human brain...
  14. ncbi request reprint The neuroprotective effects of estrogen on the aging brain
    Ray Norbury
    Section of Brain Maturation, Department of Psychological Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry, Box P050, De Crespigny Park, London SE5 8AF, UK
    Exp Gerontol 38:109-17. 2003
    ..The authors conclude that it is unlikely that estrogen will become a stand-alone treatment for any of these disorders, although there may still be a role as an adjunctive treatment and as a prophylactic measure...
  15. ncbi request reprint Oestrogen: brain ageing, cognition and neuropsychiatric disorder
    Ray Norbury
    Section of Brain Maturation, Department of Psychological Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry, De Crespigny Park, London, UK
    J Br Menopause Soc 10:118-22. 2004
    ..Here we review research into the effects of oestrogen on brain maturation and function and discuss the role for oestrogen replacement therapy (ERT) as a therapeutic tool...
  16. doi request reprint Affective modulation of anterior cingulate cortex in young people at increased familial risk of depression
    Zola N Mannie
    University Department of Psychiatry, Warneford Hospital, Oxford, UK
    Br J Psychiatry 192:356-61. 2008
    ..We previously found that children of parents with depression showed impaired performance on a task of emotional categorisation...
  17. ncbi request reprint In vivo effects of estrogen on human brain
    William J Cutter
    Section of Brain Maturation, Department of Psychological Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry, De Crespigny Park, London SE5 8AF, UK
    Ann N Y Acad Sci 1007:79-88. 2003
    ..In this article we review research into the effects of estrogen on the human brain and we consider the role for ERT as a therapeutic tool...
  18. doi request reprint Risk for depression is associated with neural biases in emotional categorisation
    Stella W Y Chan
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford, UK
    Neuropsychologia 46:2896-903. 2008
    ..These results highlight a role of the fronto-parietal circuitry in emotional processing and further suggest that negative biases in these neural processes may be involved in risk for depression...