Brian C J Moore

Summary

Affiliation: University of Cambridge
Country: UK

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Comparison of two adaptive procedures for fitting a multi-channel compression hearing aid
    Brian C J Moore
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
    Int J Audiol 44:345-57. 2005
  2. ncbi request reprint Amplitude modulation detection by listeners with unilateral dead regions
    Brian C J Moore
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, England
    J Am Acad Audiol 20:597-606. 2009
  3. doi request reprint Development of a new method for deriving initial fittings for hearing aids with multi-channel compression: CAMEQ2-HF
    Brian C J Moore
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, UK
    Int J Audiol 49:216-27. 2010
  4. doi request reprint Discrimination of complex tones with unresolved components using temporal fine structure information
    Brian C J Moore
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EB, England
    J Acoust Soc Am 125:3214-22. 2009
  5. doi request reprint Sensitivity of the human auditory system to temporal fine structure at high frequencies
    Brian C J Moore
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EB, England
    J Acoust Soc Am 125:3186-93. 2009
  6. doi request reprint Assessing the possible role of frequency-shift detectors in the ability to hear out partials in complex tones
    Brian C J Moore
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
    Adv Exp Med Biol 787:127-35. 2013
  7. doi request reprint Comparison of the CAM2 and NAL-NL2 hearing aid fitting methods
    Brian C J Moore
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
    Ear Hear 34:83-95. 2013
  8. doi request reprint Effects of bandwidth, compression speed, and gain at high frequencies on preferences for amplified music
    Brian C J Moore
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge, CB2 3EB England, UK
    Trends Amplif 16:159-72. 2012
  9. ncbi request reprint The effects of age on temporal fine structure sensitivity in monaural and binaural conditions
    Brian C J Moore
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
    Int J Audiol 51:715-21. 2012
  10. doi request reprint Frequency difference limens at high frequencies: evidence for a transition from a temporal to a place code
    Brian C J Moore
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EB, United Kingdom
    J Acoust Soc Am 132:1542-7. 2012

Detail Information

Publications126 found, 100 shown here

  1. ncbi request reprint Comparison of two adaptive procedures for fitting a multi-channel compression hearing aid
    Brian C J Moore
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
    Int J Audiol 44:345-57. 2005
    ..Preference for the Camadapt fitting was associated with slightly better speech communication with Camadapt, while preference for the Eartuner fitting was associated with fewer problems with aversion for that procedure...
  2. ncbi request reprint Amplitude modulation detection by listeners with unilateral dead regions
    Brian C J Moore
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, England
    J Am Acad Audiol 20:597-606. 2009
    ....
  3. doi request reprint Development of a new method for deriving initial fittings for hearing aids with multi-channel compression: CAMEQ2-HF
    Brian C J Moore
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, UK
    Int J Audiol 49:216-27. 2010
    ....
  4. doi request reprint Discrimination of complex tones with unresolved components using temporal fine structure information
    Brian C J Moore
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EB, England
    J Acoust Soc Am 125:3214-22. 2009
    ....
  5. doi request reprint Sensitivity of the human auditory system to temporal fine structure at high frequencies
    Brian C J Moore
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EB, England
    J Acoust Soc Am 125:3186-93. 2009
    ..Supplementary experiments confirmed that performance was not based on changes in the excitation pattern or on the discrimination of partially resolved components...
  6. doi request reprint Assessing the possible role of frequency-shift detectors in the ability to hear out partials in complex tones
    Brian C J Moore
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
    Adv Exp Med Biol 787:127-35. 2013
    ..To explain this, it is argued that activation of FSDs depends both on the size of the frequency shift between successive components and on the pitch strength of each component...
  7. doi request reprint Comparison of the CAM2 and NAL-NL2 hearing aid fitting methods
    Brian C J Moore
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
    Ear Hear 34:83-95. 2013
    ....
  8. doi request reprint Effects of bandwidth, compression speed, and gain at high frequencies on preferences for amplified music
    Brian C J Moore
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge, CB2 3EB England, UK
    Trends Amplif 16:159-72. 2012
    ..For a high-input level (80 dB SPL), slow compression was preferred over fast compression...
  9. ncbi request reprint The effects of age on temporal fine structure sensitivity in monaural and binaural conditions
    Brian C J Moore
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
    Int J Audiol 51:715-21. 2012
    ....
  10. doi request reprint Frequency difference limens at high frequencies: evidence for a transition from a temporal to a place code
    Brian C J Moore
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EB, United Kingdom
    J Acoust Soc Am 132:1542-7. 2012
    ..The results are consistent with the idea that there is a transition from a temporal to a place mechanism at about 8 kHz, rather than at 4-5 kHz, as is commonly assumed...
  11. doi request reprint Contributions of von Békésy to psychoacoustics
    Brian C J Moore
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EB, United Kingdom
    Hear Res 293:51-7. 2012
    ..While subsequent research has failed to replicate some of his findings, other findings have stood the test of time. There is no doubt that von Békésy made very substantial contributions to psychoacoustic research...
  12. doi request reprint A version of the TEN Test for use with ER-3A insert earphones
    Brian C J Moore
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
    Ear Hear 33:554-7. 2012
    ..It can also be useful when ambient noise levels are problematic...
  13. pmc Effects of pulsing of a target tone on the ability to hear it out in different types of complex sounds
    Brian C J Moore
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EB, England
    J Acoust Soc Am 131:2927-37. 2012
    ..It is argued that when the target and background are steady tones, pulsing the target may result both in reduction of perceptual confusion and recovery from adaptation...
  14. doi request reprint The influence of age and high-frequency hearing loss on sensitivity to temporal fine structure at low frequencies (L)
    Brian C J Moore
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EB, United Kingdom
    J Acoust Soc Am 131:1003-6. 2012
    ..The results do not confirm that sensitivity to TFS at low frequencies is influenced by hearing loss at high frequencies, independently of age...
  15. doi request reprint The effect of hearing loss on the resolution of partials and fundamental frequency discrimination
    Brian C J Moore
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EB, United Kingdom
    J Acoust Soc Am 130:2891-901. 2011
    ..The results support the idea that F0 discrimination of tones with low harmonics depends on the ability to resolve the harmonics...
  16. pmc Properties of auditory stream formation
    Brian C J Moore
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EB, UK
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 367:919-31. 2012
    ..Regularities in the temporal pattern of elements within a stream can help in stabilizing that stream...
  17. doi request reprint Resolvability of components in complex tones and implications for theories of pitch perception
    Brian C J Moore
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EB, UK
    Hear Res 276:88-97. 2011
    ..Evidence is presented suggesting a partial dissociation between resolution in the excitation pattern and the ability to hear out a partial. It is proposed that the latter requires information from temporal fine structure (phase locking)...
  18. doi request reprint Determination of preferred parameters for multichannel compression using individually fitted simulated hearing AIDS and paired comparisons
    Brian C J Moore
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
    Ear Hear 32:556-68. 2011
    ..To determine preferred parameters of multichannel compression using individually fitted simulated hearing aids and a method of paired comparisons...
  19. ncbi request reprint Modeling binaural loudness
    Brian C J Moore
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EB, England
    J Acoust Soc Am 121:1604-12. 2007
    ..The modified model gives reasonably accurate predictions of a variety of data on the loudness of binaural stimuli, including data obtained using loudness scaling and loudness matching procedures...
  20. ncbi request reprint The role of temporal fine structure in harmonic segregation through mistuning
    Brian C J Moore
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EB, England
    J Acoust Soc Am 127:5-8. 2010
    ..Here, it is argued that such cues could have led to the improvement in performance produced by mistuning the odd harmonics...
  21. doi request reprint Effect of level on the discrimination of harmonic and frequency-shifted complex tones at high frequencies
    Brian C J Moore
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EB, England
    J Acoust Soc Am 129:3206-12. 2011
    ..The results did not show such an effect, suggesting that the task was not performed using excitation-pattern cues...
  22. doi request reprint Detection of dead regions in the cochlea: relevance for combined electric and acoustic stimulation
    Brian C J Moore
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
    Adv Otorhinolaryngol 67:43-50. 2010
    ..The TEN test is a simple clinical method for diagnosis of dead regions. Where this test gives a positive diagnosis, it is recommended that psychophysical tuning curves be measured to define the value of f(e) more precisely...
  23. doi request reprint The relationship between tinnitus pitch and the edge frequency of the audiogram in individuals with hearing impairment and tonal tinnitus
    Brian C J Moore
    Department of Experimental Psychology, Cambridge University, Downing Street, Cambridge CB23EB, UK
    Hear Res 261:51-6. 2010
    ..A clear relationship was found between the values of f(e) and the mean pitch matches following training; the correlation was 0.94. Generally, the pitch matches were close in value to the values of f(e)...
  24. ncbi request reprint Frequency discrimination of complex tones; assessing the role of component resolvability and temporal fine structure
    Brian C J Moore
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EB, England
    J Acoust Soc Am 119:480-90. 2006
    ..When the center frequency was increased to 5000 Hz, performance was much worse for low N, suggesting that phase locking is important for obtaining low FODLs with resolved harmonics...
  25. ncbi request reprint Frequency discrimination of complex tones by hearing-impaired subjects: Evidence for loss of ability to use temporal fine structure
    Brian C J Moore
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EB, United Kingdom
    Hear Res 222:16-27. 2006
    ..Performance was much worse than obtained for normally hearing subjects at the same center frequency, suggesting that most of the hearing-impaired subjects had a poor ability to use temporal fine structure information...
  26. doi request reprint Estimation of the center frequency of the highest modulation filter
    Brian C J Moore
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, England
    J Acoust Soc Am 125:1075-81. 2009
    ..For the 120-Hz signal, two listeners showed the former pattern, and two showed the latter pattern. The results support the idea that the highest modulation filter has a center frequency in the range 100-120 Hz...
  27. ncbi request reprint Effects of level and frequency on the audibility of partials in inharmonic complex tones
    Brian C J Moore
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EB, England
    J Acoust Soc Am 120:934-44. 2006
    ..In experiment 2, L was 70 dB SPL and f(c) was 3544 Hz. Performance worsened markedly for partial frequencies above 3544 Hz, consistent with a role of phase locking...
  28. doi request reprint Effects of pulsing of the target tone on the audibility of partials in inharmonic complex tones
    Brian C J Moore
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EB, England
    J Acoust Soc Am 125:3194-3204. 2009
    ....
  29. pmc Introduction. The perception of speech: from sound to meaning
    Brian C J Moore
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EB, UK
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 363:917-21. 2008
    ....
  30. ncbi request reprint The choice of compression speed in hearing AIDS: theoretical and practical considerations and the role of individual differences
    Brian C J Moore
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
    Trends Amplif 12:103-12. 2008
    ..It is proposed that a test of the ability to process temporal fine structure might be useful for selecting compression speed for an individual...
  31. ncbi request reprint Evaluation of the CAMEQ2-HF method for fitting hearing aids with multichannel amplitude compression
    Brian C J Moore
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
    Ear Hear 31:657-66. 2010
    ..This study describes an evaluation of the method, using a 16-channel behind the ear hearing aid incorporating slow-acting compression and providing gain for frequencies up to 7500 Hz...
  32. pmc The role of temporal fine structure processing in pitch perception, masking, and speech perception for normal-hearing and hearing-impaired people
    Brian C J Moore
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge, CB2 3EB, UK
    J Assoc Res Otolaryngol 9:399-406. 2008
    ..Evidence is reviewed suggesting that cochlear hearing loss reduces the ability to use TFS cues. The perceptual consequences of this, and reasons why it may happen, are discussed...
  33. doi request reprint Development of a fast method for determining sensitivity to temporal fine structure
    Brian C J Moore
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge, UK
    Int J Audiol 48:161-71. 2009
    ..The results show that, for normal-hearing subjects, learning effects are small, and the effect of the level of testing is also small. The test provides a simple, quick, and robust way to measure sensitivity to TFS...
  34. pmc Spectro-temporal characteristics of speech at high frequencies, and the potential for restoration of audibility to people with mild-to-moderate hearing loss
    Brian C J Moore
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, England
    Ear Hear 29:907-22. 2008
    ..This study was intended to provide information that could be useful in quantifying appropriate high-frequency gains, and in establishing the population of hearing-impaired people who might benefit from such amplification...
  35. ncbi request reprint Effect of spatial separation, extended bandwidth, and compression speed on intelligibility in a competing-speech task
    Brian C J Moore
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EB, England
    J Acoust Soc Am 128:360-71. 2010
    ..There were marked individual differences both in the benefit from extended bandwidth and in the relative benefit of slow and fast compression...
  36. ncbi request reprint Development of a revised loudness model
    Brian C J Moore
    Dept of Experimental Psychol, Univ of Cambridge, Downing St, Cambridge CB3 9LG, UK
    J Acoust Soc Am 125:2563. 2009
    ..More recently, the model has been modified to include the concept of binaural inhibition, to accommodate experimental evidence indicating that loudness does not simply sum across ears...
  37. pmc Basic auditory processes involved in the analysis of speech sounds
    Brian C J Moore
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EB, UK
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 363:947-63. 2008
    ..However, for people with impaired hearing, speech perception is often much less robust...
  38. ncbi request reprint Testing the concept of softness imperception: loudness near threshold for hearing-impaired ears
    Brian C J Moore
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EB, United Kingdom
    J Acoust Soc Am 115:3103-11. 2004
    ..g., 2 dB SL matched 2 dB SL). This relationship held for SLs up to 4-10 dB, depending on the subject. These results are not consistent with the concept of softness imperception...
  39. doi request reprint Evaluation of a frequency transposition algorithm using wearable hearing aids
    Joanna D Robinson
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, UK
    Int J Audiol 48:384-93. 2009
    ..Overall, the results showed no benefit with the transposition even after experience. Subjective preference was generally for the control condition...
  40. doi request reprint Tolerable hearing aid delays. V. Estimation of limits for open canal fittings
    Michael A Stone
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, England
    Ear Hear 29:601-17. 2008
    ....
  41. ncbi request reprint Benefit of high-rate envelope cues in vocoder processing: effect of number of channels and spectral region
    Michael A Stone
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EB, United Kingdom
    J Acoust Soc Am 124:2272-82. 2008
    ..For N=18, the reverse was true. The results indicate that the channel bandwidths can compromise the transmission of f0-related envelope information, and suggest that vocoder simulations of cochlear-implant processing have limitations...
  42. pmc Effects of moderate cochlear hearing loss on the ability to benefit from temporal fine structure information in speech
    Kathryn Hopkins
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EB, United Kingdom
    J Acoust Soc Am 123:1140-53. 2008
    ..TFS information may be important in identifying the temporal "dips" in such a background...
  43. doi request reprint The dynamic range of useful temporal fine structure cues for speech in the presence of a competing talker
    Michael A Stone
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EB, United Kingdom
    J Acoust Soc Am 130:2162-72. 2011
    ..When E(O) + TFS information was added at the peaks, IIFs peaked around -2 dB, but when E(O) + TFS information was added at the valleys, the peaks lay around +1 dB...
  44. ncbi request reprint Evaluation of an aided TEN test for diagnosis of dead regions in the cochlea
    Josephine Marriage
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
    Ear Hear 29:392-400. 2008
    ....
  45. doi request reprint The effects of age and cochlear hearing loss on temporal fine structure sensitivity, frequency selectivity, and speech reception in noise
    Kathryn Hopkins
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge, CB2 3EB United Kingdom
    J Acoust Soc Am 130:334-49. 2011
    ....
  46. doi request reprint The importance for speech intelligibility of random fluctuations in "steady" background noise
    Michael A Stone
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EB, England
    J Acoust Soc Am 130:2874-81. 2011
    ..For EDM, this pattern was reversed. Intelligibility with steady noise was consistently very poor for SDM, but near-ceiling for EDM, demonstrating that the random fluctuations in steady noise have a large effect...
  47. ncbi request reprint Dead regions in the cochlea and enhancement of frequency discrimination: Effects of audiogram slope, unilateral versus bilateral loss, and hearing-aid use
    Karolina Kluk
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge, CB2 3EB, UK
    Hear Res 222:1-15. 2006
    ..One subject with a high-frequency DR in one ear and good hearing in the other ear showed an enhanced DLF in her better ear...
  48. doi request reprint The effects of the addition of low-level, low-noise noise on the intelligibility of sentences processed to remove temporal envelope information
    Kathryn Hopkins
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EB, United Kingdom
    J Acoust Soc Am 128:2150-61. 2010
    ..e., tone vocoding). The intelligibility of TFS speech and recovered-envelope speech fell as N increased, although TFS speech was still highly intelligible for values of N for which the intelligibility of recovered-envelope speech was low...
  49. doi request reprint Preliminary evaluation of a method for fitting hearing aids with extended bandwidth
    Christian Füllgrabe
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, UK
    Int J Audiol 49:741-53. 2010
    ..5 versus 5 kHz); (4) Identification of vowel-consonant-vowel nonsense syllables improved with increasing bandwidth from 5 to 7.5 kHz for the NH but not for the HI listeners...
  50. doi request reprint The dominant region for the pitch of complex tones with low fundamental frequencies
    Helen M Jackson
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EB, England
    J Acoust Soc Am 134:1193-204. 2013
    ....
  51. ncbi request reprint Use of high-rate envelope speech cues and their perceptually relevant dynamic range for the hearing impaired
    Michael A Stone
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EB, England
    J Acoust Soc Am 132:1141-51. 2012
    ..This range is similar in width to, but about 3 dB higher in absolute level than, that found for normal-hearing listeners, despite the reduced dynamic range of the HI listeners...
  52. ncbi request reprint Effect of enhancement of spectral changes on speech intelligibility and clarity preferences for the hearing impaired
    Jing Chen
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EB, England
    J Acoust Soc Am 131:2987-98. 2012
    ..Further work is needed to determine whether tailoring the processing to the characteristics of the individual hearing-impaired listener is beneficial...
  53. doi request reprint Disrupting within-channel cues to comodulation masking release
    Simon A Goldman
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EB, England
    J Acoust Soc Am 129:3181-93. 2011
    ..Simulations indicated that OFB reversal reduces the availability of within-channel cues based upon temporal fine structure and changes in envelope statistics...
  54. ncbi request reprint Effect of linear and warped spectral transposition on consonant identification by normal-hearing listeners with a simulated dead region
    Christian Füllgrabe
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
    Int J Audiol 49:420-33. 2010
    ..Significant improvements occurred with training, but overall performance following training was similar for all conditions. However, transposition reduced some frequent errors...
  55. doi request reprint Relative contribution to speech intelligibility of different envelope modulation rates within the speech dynamic range
    Michael A Stone
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EB, England
    J Acoust Soc Am 128:2127-37. 2010
    ..Intensity-importance functions for higher-rate envelope modulations suggested that levels ranging from 20 dB below to about 10 dB above the channel RMS level were important, with maximum importance for levels around -5 dB...
  56. ncbi request reprint Dead regions and pitch perception
    Martina Huss
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge, CB2 3EB, United Kingdom
    J Acoust Soc Am 117:3841-52. 2005
    ..Overall, the results indicate that the pitch of low-frequency tones is not conveyed solely by a temporal code. Possibly, there needs to be a correspondence between place and temporal information for a normal pitch to be perceived...
  57. ncbi request reprint Asymmetry of masking between complex tones and noise: partial loudness
    Hedwig Gockel
    CNBH, Department of Physiology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EG, England
    J Acoust Soc Am 114:349-60. 2003
    ..The results are interpreted in terms of the temporal structure of the stimuli...
  58. doi request reprint Perceptual thresholds for detecting modifications applied to the acoustical properties of a violin
    Claudia Fritz
    Centre for Music and Science, Music Faculty, University of Cambridge, West Road, Cambridge CB3 9DP, United Kingdom
    J Acoust Soc Am 122:3640-50. 2007
    ..5%-20% for frequency changes. Interpretation of the results using excitation patterns showed that thresholds for the best subjects were quite well predicted by a multichannel model based on optimal processing...
  59. doi request reprint Contribution of temporal fine structure information and fundamental frequency separation to intelligibility in a competing-speaker paradigm
    Helen M Jackson
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EB, United Kingdom
    J Acoust Soc Am 133:2421-30. 2013
    ....
  60. doi request reprint Effects of the selective disruption of within- and across-channel cues to comodulation masking release
    Simon A Goldman
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge, CB2 3EB, England
    J Acoust Soc Am 130:2866-73. 2011
    ..CMR for the proximal-FB configuration persisted when both manipulations were used together, which suggests that OFB reversal does not entirely eliminate within-channel cues...
  61. ncbi request reprint Using transposition to improve consonant discrimination and detection for listeners with severe high-frequency hearing loss
    Joanna D Robinson
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, UK
    Int J Audiol 46:293-308. 2007
    ..The perception of affricates was consistently improved. Averaged across subjects, the detection of word-final 's' and 'z' was significantly improved, with five subjects improving significantly individually...
  62. doi request reprint Comparison of dual-time-constant and fast-acting automatic gain control (AGC) systems in cochlear implants
    Patrick J Boyle
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge, UK
    Int J Audiol 48:211-21. 2009
    ..It is suggested that the poorer performance for AGC1 occurred because AGC1 introduced cross-modulation between the target speech and background noise, which made perceptual separation of the target and background more difficult...
  63. doi request reprint Sequential streaming due to manipulation of interaural time differences
    Thomas H Stainsby
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EB, England
    J Acoust Soc Am 130:904-14. 2011
    ..It is concluded that the differences in apparent spatial location produced by ITD have only weak effects on obligatory streaming...
  64. doi request reprint Comodulation masking release: effects of training and experimental design on use of within- and across-channel cues
    Simon A Goldman
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EB, England
    J Acoust Soc Am 132:303-16. 2012
    ..Experiment Three tested naive subjects using two FBs, but with noise presented continuously and a different auditory grouping manipulation, after Grose et al. [(2009), J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 125, 282-293]. CMR was large from the outset...
  65. doi request reprint The role of time and place cues in the detection of frequency modulation by hearing-impaired listeners
    Stephan M A Ernst
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge, CB2 3EB, United Kingdom
    J Acoust Soc Am 131:4722-31. 2012
    ..For higher carrier frequencies and for all carrier frequencies with f(m) = 10 Hz, FM detection was probably based on place cues...
  66. ncbi request reprint Sequential streaming and effective level differences due to phase-spectrum manipulations
    Thomas H Stainsby
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EB, United Kingdom
    J Acoust Soc Am 115:1665-73. 2004
    ..While some of the stream segregation observed by Roberts et al. may have been due to a difference in effective excitation level, this does not account for the stream segregation between cosine- and alternating-phase stimuli...
  67. ncbi request reprint The origin of binaural interaction in the modulation domain
    Aleksander Sek
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EB, England
    J Acoust Soc Am 127:2451-60. 2010
    ..Also, the obtained phase effects were not correctly predicted using a model based on short-term loudness fluctuations...
  68. ncbi request reprint Potential benefits of across-aid communication for bilaterally aided people: listening in a car
    Virginia M Richards
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
    Int J Audiol 45:182-9. 2006
    ..The cross-aid conditions led to improved intelligibility compared to the reference conditions. The results indicate that the transfer of signals between hearing aids may be of benefit when listening to speech in a car...
  69. ncbi request reprint Dead regions and noisiness of pure tones
    Martina Huss
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, UK
    Int J Audiol 44:599-611. 2005
    ..Both normally hearing and hearing-impaired subjects rated 0.125 kHz and 12 kHz tones as somewhat noise-like, independently of the existence of a DR...
  70. ncbi request reprint New version of the TEN test with calibrations in dB HL
    Brian C J Moore
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EB, UK
    Ear Hear 25:478-87. 2004
    ..To develop a new version of the threshold-equalizing-noise (TEN) test for the diagnosis of dead regions, with levels calibrated in dB HL rather than dB SPL, and with levels corresponding to the dial readings on the audiometer...
  71. ncbi request reprint Dead regions in the cochlea: conceptual foundations, diagnosis, and clinical applications
    Brian C J Moore
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EB, UK
    Ear Hear 25:98-116. 2004
    ..Finally, guidelines for implementation of the threshold-equalizing noise test in clinical practice are given...
  72. ncbi request reprint Effects of three amplification strategies on speech perception by children with severe and profound hearing loss
    Josephine E Marriage
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
    Ear Hear 26:35-47. 2005
    ..In this study, speech recognition and discrimination were assessed for severely and profoundly hearing-impaired children, using three different amplification strategies, including WDRC...
  73. ncbi request reprint The effect on speech intelligibility of varying compression time constants in a digital hearing aid
    Brian C J Moore
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
    Int J Audiol 43:399-409. 2004
    ..We conclude that the intelligibility of speech at a fixed level, presented in background sounds, is not markedly affected by rather substantial variations of the time constants in a multichannel compression system...
  74. ncbi request reprint The loudness of sounds whose spectra differ at the two ears
    Brian R Glasberg
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EB, England
    J Acoust Soc Am 127:2433-40. 2010
    ..The pattern of the results was consistent with the predictions of the model, showing an increase in loudness as the number of composite bands increased and their spacing decreased...
  75. doi request reprint Enhanced discrimination of low-frequency sounds for subjects with high-frequency dead regions
    Brian C J Moore
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
    Brain 132:524-36. 2009
    ..We conclude that a dead region at high frequencies is associated with a better ability to process information at low frequencies. These effects may reflect cortical plasticity induced by the dead regions...
  76. ncbi request reprint Phase effects in masking: within- versus across-channel processes
    José I Alcántara
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EB, England
    J Acoust Soc Am 114:2158-66. 2003
    ....
  77. ncbi request reprint Detecting dead regions using psychophysical tuning curves: a comparison of simultaneous and forward masking
    Karolina Kluk
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
    Int J Audiol 45:463-76. 2006
    ..Fast PTCs measured in simultaneous masking are recommended for use in clinical practice, as they give a precise estimate of fe and are quick to administer...
  78. ncbi request reprint The relationship between stream segregation and frequency discrimination in normally hearing and hearing-impaired subjects
    Marina M Rose
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EB, England
    Hear Res 204:16-28. 2005
    ..These results suggest that the FB is not determined solely by the discriminability of successive tones...
  79. ncbi request reprint Effects of masker component phase on the forward masking produced by complex tones in normally hearing and hearing-impaired subjects
    Brian C J Moore
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, CB2 3EB, UK
    Hear Res 192:90-100. 2004
    ..The slopes of the growth-of-masking functions were consistently less than one for the hearing-impaired subjects. Further testing suggested that the efferent system was not involved in producing the phase effect...
  80. ncbi request reprint Moderate cochlear hearing loss leads to a reduced ability to use temporal fine structure information
    Kathryn Hopkins
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, England, UK
    J Acoust Soc Am 122:1055-68. 2007
    ....
  81. ncbi request reprint Effects of low pass filtering on the intelligibility of speech in noise for people with and without dead regions at high frequencies
    Thomas Baer
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom
    J Acoust Soc Am 112:1133-44. 2002
    ....
  82. ncbi request reprint The effects of hearing loss on growth-of-masking functions for sinusoidal and complex-tone maskers with differing phase spectra
    Thomas H Stainsby
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EB, England, United Kingdom
    Hear Res 225:38-49. 2007
    ..45 and 0.78 and were typically in the range 0.6-0.7. The finding of slopes below one for listeners in whom cochlear compression was probably absent is not consistent with linear-integrator models of forward masking...
  83. doi request reprint The importance of temporal fine structure information in speech at different spectral regions for normal-hearing and hearing-impaired subjects
    Kathryn Hopkins
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EB, England
    J Acoust Soc Am 127:1595-608. 2010
    ..Hearing-impaired subjects benefited less, although the benefit varied across subjects. Benefit from TFS information in speech was correlated with a psychophysical measure of TFS sensitivity obtained at two center frequencies...
  84. ncbi request reprint Tolerable hearing-aid delays: IV. effects on subjective disturbance during speech production by hearing-impaired subjects
    Michael A Stone
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, England
    Ear Hear 26:225-35. 2005
    ..The time delay was constant across frequency...
  85. ncbi request reprint Factors affecting psychophysical tuning curves for hearing-impaired subjects with high-frequency dead regions
    Karolina Kluk
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EB, UK
    Hear Res 200:115-31. 2005
    ..To minimize the influence of beats, we recommend using noise maskers with a bandwidth of 160 or (preferably) 320 Hz. In cases of near-normal hearing at low frequencies, we recommend using an additional LF noise to mask SDTs...
  86. ncbi request reprint Discrimination of the fundamental frequency of complex tones with fixed and shifting spectral envelopes by normally hearing and hearing-impaired subjects
    Brian C J Moore
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EB, UK
    Hear Res 182:153-63. 2003
    ..We suggest that, in the INT condition with Shaped stimuli, normally hearing subjects used temporal fine structure cues to perform the task. The hearing-impaired subjects appeared to use only temporal envelope cues...
  87. doi request reprint Effects of spectro-temporal modulation changes produced by multi-channel compression on intelligibility in a competing-speech task
    Michael A Stone
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EB, England
    J Acoust Soc Am 123:1063-76. 2008
    ..Intelligibility decreased as the number and speed of compression channels increased. The results are interpreted using several measures of the effects of compression, especially "across-source modulation correlation."..
  88. ncbi request reprint Comparison of three procedures for initial fitting of compression hearing aids. II. Experienced users, fitted unilaterally
    José I Alcántara
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
    Int J Audiol 43:3-14. 2004
    ..Comparison with our earlier study based on bilateral fittings suggests that the preferred gains are similar for unilateral and bilateral fittings...
  89. ncbi request reprint The relative role of beats and combination tones in determining the shapes of masking patterns: II. Hearing-impaired listeners
    José I Alcántara
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, CB2 3EB, UK
    Hear Res 165:103-16. 2002
    ..Overall, the results suggest that the irregularities in the masking patterns were caused mainly by the detection of beats and not by the detection of combination tones...
  90. ncbi request reprint Interference effects and phase sensitivity in hearing
    Brian C J Moore
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EB, UK
    Philos Transact A Math Phys Eng Sci 360:833-58. 2002
    ..Interference effects in the cochlea may also play a role in producing the spectral regularity observed in sounds reflected from the ear (otoacoustic emissions)...
  91. ncbi request reprint Tone decay for hearing-impaired listeners with and without dead regions in the cochlea
    Martina Huss
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge, CB2 3EB, England
    J Acoust Soc Am 114:3283-94. 2003
    ..The prevalence of tone decay increased when the audiometric threshold was above 50 dB HL in the frequency region where the tone was detected...
  92. ncbi request reprint Effect of frequency-modulation coherence for inharmonic stimuli: frequency-modulation phase discrimination and identification of artificial double vowels
    Johannes Lyzenga
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EB, United Kingdom
    J Acoust Soc Am 117:1314-25. 2005
    ..The identification of double vowels was not improved by a difference in FM rate across vowels, suggesting that differences in FM rate do not support perceptual segregation of inharmonic stimuli...
  93. ncbi request reprint Auditory streaming based on temporal structure in hearing-impaired listeners
    Thomas H Stainsby
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, CB2 3EB, UK
    Hear Res 192:119-30. 2004
    ..In conclusion, stream segregation due to differences in temporal structure is robust in elderly subjects with cochlear hearing loss and comparable to that found previously in young normally hearing subjects...
  94. ncbi request reprint Speech-in-noise perception in high-functioning individuals with autism or Asperger's syndrome
    José I Alcántara
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, UK
    J Child Psychol Psychiatry 45:1107-14. 2004
    ..The objective of this study was threefold: (1) to verify the validity of these reports; (2) to quantify the difficulties experienced; and (3) to propose possible mechanisms to explain the perceptual deficits described...
  95. ncbi request reprint Behavioural measurement of level-dependent shifts in the vibration pattern on the basilar membrane
    Brian C J Moore
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, CB2 3EB, Cambridge, UK
    Hear Res 163:101-10. 2002
    ..The gap threshold patterns tended to spread markedly towards lower frequencies with increasing masker level. The shift with level provides further evidence for a basalward spread of the travelling wave with increasing level...
  96. pmc Modulation masking produced by second-order modulators
    Christian Füllgrabe
    Laboratoire de Psychologie Expérimentale UMR CNRS 8581, Universite Rene Descartes Paris 5, 71 Avenue Edouard Vaillant, 92774 Boulogne Billancourt, France
    J Acoust Soc Am 117:2158-68. 2005
    ..The estimated magnitude of the modulation distortion component ranges from 5%-12%...
  97. ncbi request reprint Coding of sounds in the auditory system and its relevance to signal processing and coding in cochlear implants
    Brian C J Moore
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EB, England
    Otol Neurotol 24:243-54. 2003
    ..To review how the properties of sounds are "coded" in the normal auditory system and to discuss the extent to which cochlear implants can and do represent these codes...
  98. ncbi request reprint Factors affecting psychophysical tuning curves for normally hearing subjects
    Karolina Kluk
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EB, UK
    Hear Res 194:118-34. 2004
    ..To achieve a PTC whose shape around the tip is minimally affected by beats, we propose using a noise masker with a bandwidth approximately equal to the bandwidth of the auditory filter for which the PTC is measured...
  99. ncbi request reprint Prediction of absolute thresholds and equal-loudness contours using a modified loudness model
    Brian R Glasberg
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EB, England
    J Acoust Soc Am 120:585-8. 2006
    ..The modified model also gives reasonably accurate predictions of the equal-loudness contours published in a recent ISO standard...
  100. ncbi request reprint Psychoacoustics of normal and impaired hearing
    Brian C J Moore
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, UK
    Br Med Bull 63:121-34. 2002
    ..The implications of the results for fitting hearing aids are discussed. Finally, the effect of cochlear hearing loss on the perception of rapid sequences of sounds (stream segregation) is described...
  101. ncbi request reprint Asymmetry of masking between complex tones and noise: the role of temporal structure and peripheral compression
    Hedwig Gockel
    Department of Physiology, University of Cambridge, England
    J Acoust Soc Am 111:2759-70. 2002
    ..5 Hz, a 10-dB increase in masker level led to an increase in masked threshold of the noise of only 3.7 dB, on average. We suggest that the results for this condition are strongly affected by the active mechanism in the cochlea...