Graham R Martin

Summary

Affiliation: University of Birmingham
Country: UK

Publications

  1. pmc When cormorants go fishing: the differing costs of hunting for sedentary and motile prey
    Lewis G Halsey
    Centre for Ornithology, School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK
    Biol Lett 3:574-6. 2007
  2. ncbi request reprint Visual fields in Short-toed Eagles, Circaetus gallicus (Accipitridae), and the function of binocularity in birds
    G R Martin
    Schools of Biological Sciences and of Continuing Studies, The University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK
    Brain Behav Evol 53:55-66. 1999
  3. pmc Vision and touch in relation to foraging and predator detection: insightful contrasts between a plover and a sandpiper
    Graham R Martin
    Centre for Ornithology, School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 276:437-45. 2009
  4. doi request reprint What is binocular vision for? A birds' eye view
    Graham R Martin
    School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK
    J Vis 9:14.1-19. 2009
  5. ncbi request reprint Visual fields in flamingos: chick-feeding versus filter-feeding
    Graham R Martin
    School of Biosciences, The University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT, UK
    Naturwissenschaften 92:351-4. 2005
  6. ncbi request reprint The eyes of oilbirds (Steatornis caripensis): pushing at the limits of sensitivity
    Graham Martin
    School of Biosciences, The University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT, UK
    Naturwissenschaften 91:26-9. 2004
  7. ncbi request reprint Ostrich ocular optics
    G R Martin
    School of Biosciences, The University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK
    Brain Behav Evol 58:115-20. 2001
  8. ncbi request reprint Visual fields and foraging in procellariiform seabirds: sensory aspects of dietary segregation
    G R Martin
    School of Biosciences, The University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK
    Brain Behav Evol 57:33-8. 2001
  9. ncbi request reprint Sun shades and eye size in birds
    G R Martin
    School of Biosciences, The University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK
    Brain Behav Evol 56:340-4. 2000
  10. pmc Kiwi forego vision in the guidance of their nocturnal activities
    Graham R Martin
    Centre for Ornithology, School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 2:e198. 2007

Detail Information

Publications20

  1. pmc When cormorants go fishing: the differing costs of hunting for sedentary and motile prey
    Lewis G Halsey
    Centre for Ornithology, School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK
    Biol Lett 3:574-6. 2007
    ..The period of descent in all the dives undertaken appears to have been more expensive when the birds foraged on sedentary prey, probably due to a higher swimming speed during this period...
  2. ncbi request reprint Visual fields in Short-toed Eagles, Circaetus gallicus (Accipitridae), and the function of binocularity in birds
    G R Martin
    Schools of Biological Sciences and of Continuing Studies, The University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK
    Brain Behav Evol 53:55-66. 1999
    ....
  3. pmc Vision and touch in relation to foraging and predator detection: insightful contrasts between a plover and a sandpiper
    Graham R Martin
    Centre for Ornithology, School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 276:437-45. 2009
    ....
  4. doi request reprint What is binocular vision for? A birds' eye view
    Graham R Martin
    School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK
    J Vis 9:14.1-19. 2009
    ..The wider binocular fields of owls may be the product of an interaction between enlarged eyes and enlarged outer ears, which may simply prevent more lateral placement of the eyes...
  5. ncbi request reprint Visual fields in flamingos: chick-feeding versus filter-feeding
    Graham R Martin
    School of Biosciences, The University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT, UK
    Naturwissenschaften 92:351-4. 2005
    ..We propose that chick-feeding may be the ultimate determinant of visual field topography in birds, not feeding ecology...
  6. ncbi request reprint The eyes of oilbirds (Steatornis caripensis): pushing at the limits of sensitivity
    Graham Martin
    School of Biosciences, The University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT, UK
    Naturwissenschaften 91:26-9. 2004
    ..This explains why these birds employ other sensory cues, including olfaction and echolocation, in the control of their behaviour in low-light-level environments...
  7. ncbi request reprint Ostrich ocular optics
    G R Martin
    School of Biosciences, The University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK
    Brain Behav Evol 58:115-20. 2001
    ..Interspecific comparison shows that optically the ostrich eye is a larger scaled version of the eyes of common starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) and an owl (Strix aluco)...
  8. ncbi request reprint Visual fields and foraging in procellariiform seabirds: sensory aspects of dietary segregation
    G R Martin
    School of Biosciences, The University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK
    Brain Behav Evol 57:33-8. 2001
    ..White-chinned petrel eyes and visual fields show features of an amphibious optical design similar to those found in penguins and albatrosses...
  9. ncbi request reprint Sun shades and eye size in birds
    G R Martin
    School of Biosciences, The University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK
    Brain Behav Evol 56:340-4. 2000
    ..We propose that the reduced visual fields and optical adnexa of the larger-eyed birds are primarily concerned with the maintenance of high spatial resolution...
  10. pmc Kiwi forego vision in the guidance of their nocturnal activities
    Graham R Martin
    Centre for Ornithology, School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 2:e198. 2007
    ..Freed from these mass constraints, it would be predicted that in flightless birds nocturnality should favour the evolution of large eyes and reliance upon visual cues for the guidance of activity...
  11. doi request reprint Pedestrian locomotion energetics and gait characteristics of a diving bird, the great cormorant, Phalacrocorax carbo
    Craig R White
    Centre for Ornithology, School of Biosciences, The University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, UK
    J Comp Physiol B 178:745-54. 2008
    ....
  12. pmc Vision and foraging in cormorants: more like herons than hawks?
    Craig R White
    Centre for Ornithology, School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 2:e639. 2007
    ..However, nothing is known of the visual performance of these birds and how this might influence their prey capture technique...
  13. ncbi request reprint Metabolic rate throughout the annual cycle reveals the demands of an Arctic existence in great cormorants
    Craig R White
    Centre for Ornithology, School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham BIS 2TT, United Kingdom
    Ecology 92:475-86. 2011
    ..Our study demonstrates the importance of obtaining accurate measurements of physiology and behavior from free-living animals when attempting to understand their ecology...
  14. ncbi request reprint Respirometry: anhydrous drierite equilibrates with carbon dioxide and increases washout times
    Craig R White
    Centre for Ornithology, School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT, United Kingdom
    Physiol Biochem Zool 79:977-80. 2006
    ..When Drierite is exhausted and then recharged according to the manufacturer's instructions, the CO(2) affinity is further reduced, and washout times are less than 60% greater than when no desiccant is used...
  15. pmc Vision, touch and object manipulation in Senegal parrots Poicephalus senegalus
    Zoe P Demery
    Centre for Ornithology, School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 278:3687-93. 2011
    ....
  16. doi request reprint Sublingual fistula in a masked booby (Sula dactylatra) and possible role of ectoparasites in its etiology
    B John Hughes
    Centre for Ornithology, School of Biosciences, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK
    J Wildl Dis 49:455-7. 2013
    ..The cause is unknown. Masked Boobies (Sula dactylatra) are the third avian species to be reported with this condition. We argue that ectoparasite infestation of hatchlings may be an initial cause...
  17. pmc Basal metabolic rate of birds is associated with habitat temperature and precipitation, not primary productivity
    Craig R White
    Centre for Ornithology, School of Biosciences, The University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 274:287-93. 2007
    ..Instead, BMR was negatively associated with Ta and Tr, and positively associated with PCV...
  18. doi request reprint Extreme binocular vision and a straight bill facilitate tool use in New Caledonian crows
    Jolyon Troscianko
    School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK
    Nat Commun 3:1110. 2012
    ..To our knowledge, this is the first evidence for tool-use-related morphological features outside the hominin lineage...
  19. doi request reprint Does food supplementation really enhance productivity of breeding birds?
    Timothy J E Harrison
    Centre for Ornithology, School of Biosciences, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, The University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, UK
    Oecologia 164:311-20. 2010
    ..We discuss the striking parallels between our findings and patterns in blue and great tit reproduction in urban habitats, and conclude that supplementary feeding may not always enhance the breeding productivity of birds...
  20. ncbi request reprint Moving towards acceleration for estimates of activity-specific metabolic rate in free-living animals: the case of the cormorant
    Rory P Wilson
    Institute of Environmental Sustainability, School of the Environment and Society, University of Wales Swansea, Singleton Park, Swansea SA2 8PP, Wales, UK
    J Anim Ecol 75:1081-90. 2006
    ....