G A Macho

Summary

Affiliation: University of Liverpool
Country: UK

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Primate molar crown formation times and life history evolution revisited
    G A Macho
    Hominid Paleontology Research Group, Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, England, UK
    Am J Primatol 55:189-201. 2001
  2. ncbi request reprint Australopithecus anamensis: a finite-element approach to studying the functional adaptations of extinct hominins
    Gabriele A Macho
    Palaeontology Research Group, Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3GE, UK
    Anat Rec A Discov Mol Cell Evol Biol 283:310-8. 2005
  3. ncbi request reprint On the scaling relationship between enamel prism length and enamel thickness in primate molars: a comment
    Gabriele A Macho
    Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Biology, Hominid Palaeontology Research Group, The University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3GE, England
    Ann Anat 186:413-6. 2004
  4. ncbi request reprint Effects of loading on the biomechanical [correction of biochemical] behavior of molars of Homo, Pan, and Pongo
    G A Macho
    Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Liverpool, UK
    Am J Phys Anthropol 109:211-27. 1999
  5. ncbi request reprint Effect of prism orientation and loading direction on contact stresses in prismatic enamel of primates: implications for interpreting wear patterns
    Daisuke Shimizu
    Hominid Palaeontology Research Group, Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3GE, UK
    Am J Phys Anthropol 126:427-34. 2005
  6. ncbi request reprint Did knuckle walking evolve twice?
    M Dainton
    Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Biology, The University of Liverpool, UK
    J Hum Evol 36:171-94. 1999
  7. doi request reprint Dietary adaptations of South African australopiths: inference from enamel prism attitude
    Gabriele A Macho
    Department of Archaeological Science, University of Bradford, Bradford BD7 1DP, England, UK
    J Hum Evol 57:241-7. 2009
  8. ncbi request reprint An investigation into fractured surfaces of enamel of modern human teeth: a combined SEM and computer visualisation study
    Y Jiang
    Hominid Palaeontology Research Group, Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Biology, The University of Liverpool, The Sherrington Buildings, L69 3GE, Liverpool, UK
    Arch Oral Biol 48:449-57. 2003
  9. ncbi request reprint Enamel microstructure--a truly three-dimensional structure
    Gabriele A Macho
    J Hum Evol 45:81-90. 2003
  10. ncbi request reprint Functional significance of the microstructural detail of the primate dentino-enamel junction: a possible example of exaptation
    Daisuke Shimizu
    Palaeoanthropology Research Group, Centre for Research in Evolutionary Anthropology, School of Human and Life Sciences, Roehampton University, London SW15 4JD, UK
    J Hum Evol 52:103-11. 2007

Detail Information

Publications11

  1. ncbi request reprint Primate molar crown formation times and life history evolution revisited
    G A Macho
    Hominid Paleontology Research Group, Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, England, UK
    Am J Primatol 55:189-201. 2001
    ..If confirmed in future studies, crown formation time may again become a powerful tool in evolutionary enquiry...
  2. ncbi request reprint Australopithecus anamensis: a finite-element approach to studying the functional adaptations of extinct hominins
    Gabriele A Macho
    Palaeontology Research Group, Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3GE, UK
    Anat Rec A Discov Mol Cell Evol Biol 283:310-8. 2005
    ..anamensis was probably adapted for habitually consuming a hard-tough diet. However, additional tests are needed to understand the functional adaptations of A. anamensis teeth fully...
  3. ncbi request reprint On the scaling relationship between enamel prism length and enamel thickness in primate molars: a comment
    Gabriele A Macho
    Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Biology, Hominid Palaeontology Research Group, The University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3GE, England
    Ann Anat 186:413-6. 2004
    ..Finally, the findings highlight the importance of employing species-specific correction factors for the calculation of prism length (i.e., life-span of the ameloblast) for life history enquiry...
  4. ncbi request reprint Effects of loading on the biomechanical [correction of biochemical] behavior of molars of Homo, Pan, and Pongo
    G A Macho
    Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Liverpool, UK
    Am J Phys Anthropol 109:211-27. 1999
    ..Overall, Pan appeared to be most generalized, while Homo and Pongo showed a number of unique specializations, which are in accordance with what is currently understood about their respective masticatory apparatus and dietary niche...
  5. ncbi request reprint Effect of prism orientation and loading direction on contact stresses in prismatic enamel of primates: implications for interpreting wear patterns
    Daisuke Shimizu
    Hominid Palaeontology Research Group, Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3GE, UK
    Am J Phys Anthropol 126:427-34. 2005
    ..Such findings appear to be supported by archeological evidence...
  6. ncbi request reprint Did knuckle walking evolve twice?
    M Dainton
    Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Biology, The University of Liverpool, UK
    J Hum Evol 36:171-94. 1999
    ..In light of morphological, behavioural and ecological data currently available it is parsimonious to suggest that knuckle walking has evolved in parallel in the two lineages...
  7. doi request reprint Dietary adaptations of South African australopiths: inference from enamel prism attitude
    Gabriele A Macho
    Department of Archaeological Science, University of Bradford, Bradford BD7 1DP, England, UK
    J Hum Evol 57:241-7. 2009
    ..africanus are better adapted to cope with more laterally-directed loads (Phase II) commonly associated with roll-crush and mastication. Overall, teeth of P. robustus appear stiffer, while those of A. africanus seem more wear resistant...
  8. ncbi request reprint An investigation into fractured surfaces of enamel of modern human teeth: a combined SEM and computer visualisation study
    Y Jiang
    Hominid Palaeontology Research Group, Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Biology, The University of Liverpool, The Sherrington Buildings, L69 3GE, Liverpool, UK
    Arch Oral Biol 48:449-57. 2003
    ..Given its non-destructive nature, computer modelling could have particular relevance for studying fragmented fossilised remains...
  9. ncbi request reprint Enamel microstructure--a truly three-dimensional structure
    Gabriele A Macho
    J Hum Evol 45:81-90. 2003
  10. ncbi request reprint Functional significance of the microstructural detail of the primate dentino-enamel junction: a possible example of exaptation
    Daisuke Shimizu
    Palaeoanthropology Research Group, Centre for Research in Evolutionary Anthropology, School of Human and Life Sciences, Roehampton University, London SW15 4JD, UK
    J Hum Evol 52:103-11. 2007
    ..However, given the equivocal relationship between scallops and presumed bite force across mammalian taxa, we propose that scallops could in fact be exaptations...
  11. ncbi request reprint Effect of enamel prism decussation and chemical composition on the biomechanical behavior of dental tissue: a theoretical approach to determine the loading conditions to which modern human teeth are adapted
    Daisuke Shimizu
    Archaeological Sciences, Division of Archaeological, Geographical and Environmental Sciences, School of Life Sciences, University of Bradford, Bradford, England
    Anat Rec (Hoboken) 291:175-82. 2008
    ..For (palaeo)biological applications, the findings suggest that the absolute strength of teeth (e.g., bite force) cannot be predicted with certainty, whereas kinematic parameters of the masticatory apparatus can...