T J Key

Summary

Affiliation: University of Oxford
Country: UK

Publications

  1. Key T, Appleby P, Cairns B, Luben R, Dahm C, Akbaraly T, et al. Dietary fat and breast cancer: comparison of results from food diaries and food-frequency questionnaires in the UK Dietary Cohort Consortium. Am J Clin Nutr. 2011;94:1043-52 pubmed publisher
    ..23) for food diaries and 0.80 (0.59, 1.09) for FFQs. In this study, breast cancer risk was not associated with fat intake in middle-aged women in the United Kingdom, irrespective of whether diet was measured by food diaries or by FFQs. ..
  2. Landais E, Moskal A, Mullee A, Nicolas G, Gunter M, Huybrechts I, et al. Coffee and Tea Consumption and the Contribution of Their Added Ingredients to Total Energy and Nutrient Intakes in 10 European Countries: Benchmark Data from the Late 1990s. Nutrients. 2018;10: pubmed publisher
    ..Coffee and tea intake and their contribution to energy and sugar intake differed greatly among European adults. Variation in consumption was mostly driven by geographical region. ..
  3. Bhoo Pathy N, Peeters P, Uiterwaal C, Bueno de Mesquita H, Bulgiba A, Bech B, et al. Coffee and tea consumption and risk of pre- and postmenopausal breast cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort study. Breast Cancer Res. 2015;17:15 pubmed publisher
    ..Higher caffeinated coffee intake may be associated with lower risk of postmenopausal breast cancer. Decaffeinated coffee intake does not seem to be associated with breast cancer. ..
  4. Romaguera D, Ward H, Wark P, Vergnaud A, Peeters P, van Gils C, et al. Pre-diagnostic concordance with the WCRF/AICR guidelines and survival in European colorectal cancer patients: a cohort study. BMC Med. 2015;13:107 pubmed publisher
    ..Greater concordance with the WCRF/AICR recommendations on diet, physical activity, and body fatness prior to CRC diagnosis is associated with improved survival among CRC patients. ..
  5. Key T, Appleby P, Travis R, Albanes D, Alberg A, Barricarte A, et al. Carotenoids, retinol, tocopherols, and prostate cancer risk: pooled analysis of 15 studies. Am J Clin Nutr. 2015;102:1142-57 pubmed publisher
    ..Whether these associations reflect causal relations is unclear. ..
  6. Merritt M, Riboli E, Murphy N, Kadi M, Tjønneland A, Olsen A, et al. Reproductive factors and risk of mortality in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition; a cohort study. BMC Med. 2015;13:252 pubmed publisher
    ..These findings may contribute to the development of improved strategies to promote better long-term health in women. ..
  7. Appleby P, Crowe F, Bradbury K, Travis R, Key T. Mortality in vegetarians and comparable nonvegetarians in the United Kingdom. Am J Clin Nutr. 2016;103:218-30 pubmed publisher
    ..United Kingdom-based vegetarians and comparable nonvegetarians have similar all-cause mortality. Differences found for specific causes of death merit further investigation. ..
  8. Sobiecki J, Appleby P, Bradbury K, Key T. High compliance with dietary recommendations in a cohort of meat eaters, fish eaters, vegetarians, and vegans: results from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-Oxford study. Nutr Res. 2016;36:464-77 pubmed publisher
    ..The diet groups under study showed striking differences in dietary intakes, with possible implications for compliance with dietary recommendations, as well as cardiometabolic diseases risk. ..
  9. Key T, Reeves G. Alcohol, diet, and risk of breast cancer. BMJ. 2016;353:i2503 pubmed publisher

More Information

Publications15

  1. Campa D, Husing A, McKay J, Sinilnikova O, Vogel U, Tjønneland A, et al. The INSIG2 rs7566605 polymorphism is not associated with body mass index and breast cancer risk. BMC Cancer. 2010;10:563 pubmed publisher
  2. request reprint
    Key T, Appleby P, Rosell M. Health effects of vegetarian and vegan diets. Proc Nutr Soc. 2006;65:35-41 pubmed
    ..Overall, the data suggest that the health of Western vegetarians is good and similar to that of comparable non-vegetarians. ..
  3. request reprint
    Key T, Appleby P, Spencer E, Roddam A, Neale R, Allen N. Calcium, diet and fracture risk: a prospective study of 1898 incident fractures among 34 696 British women and men. Public Health Nutr. 2007;10:1314-20 pubmed
    ..The risk factors for fractures are incompletely understood. An outstanding question concerns the optimal amount of dietary calcium needed to minimise the risk of fracture...
  4. Key T, Appleby P, Spencer E, Travis R, Roddam A, Allen N. Cancer incidence in vegetarians: results from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC-Oxford). Am J Clin Nutr. 2009;89:1620S-1626S pubmed publisher
    ..Within the study, the incidence of all cancers combined was lower among vegetarians than among meat eaters, but the incidence of colorectal cancer was higher in vegetarians than in meat eaters. ..
  5. Key T, Appleby P, Spencer E, Travis R, Roddam A, Allen N. Mortality in British vegetarians: results from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC-Oxford). Am J Clin Nutr. 2009;89:1613S-1619S pubmed publisher
  6. Tikk K, Sookthai D, Fortner R, Johnson T, Rinaldi S, Romieu I, et al. Circulating prolactin and in situ breast cancer risk in the European EPIC cohort: a case-control study. Breast Cancer Res. 2015;17:49 pubmed publisher
    ..15; Phet=0.07). Our data extends prior research linking prolactin and invasive breast cancer to the outcome of in situ breast tumours and shows that higher circulating prolactin is associated with increased risk of in situ breast cancer. ..