Eric B Keverne

Summary

Affiliation: University of Cambridge
Country: UK

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Epigenetically regulated imprinted genes and foetal programming
    Eric B Keverne
    Sub Department of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge, Madingley, Cambridge, CB23 8AA, UK
    Neurotox Res 18:386-92. 2010
  2. doi request reprint Epigenetics, brain evolution and behaviour
    Eric B Keverne
    Sub Department of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge, Madingley, Cambridge, CB23 8AA, UK
    Front Neuroendocrinol 29:398-412. 2008
  3. doi request reprint Visualisation of the vomeronasal pheromone response system
    Eric B Keverne
    Subdepartment of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge, Madingley, Cambridge CB238AA, UK
    Bioessays 30:802-5. 2008
  4. pmc Importance of the matriline for genomic imprinting, brain development and behaviour
    E B Keverne
    Sub Department of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge, Madingley, Cambridge CB23 8AA, UK
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 368:20110327. 2013
  5. doi request reprint Monoallelic gene expression and mammalian evolution
    Barry Keverne
    Sub Department of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB23 8AA, UK
    Bioessays 31:1318-26. 2009
  6. ncbi request reprint Vasopressin, oxytocin and social behaviour
    Eric B Keverne
    Sub Department of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge, High Street, Madingley, Cambridge CB3 8AA, UK
    Curr Opin Neurobiol 14:777-83. 2004
  7. doi request reprint The paternally expressed gene Peg3 regulates sexual experience-dependent preferences for estrous odors
    William T Swaney
    Sub Department of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
    Behav Neurosci 122:963-73. 2008
  8. doi request reprint Increased apoptosis during neonatal brain development underlies the adult behavioral deficits seen in mice lacking a functional paternally expressed gene 3 (Peg3)
    Kevin D Broad
    Sub Department of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge, Madingley, Cambridge, CB3 8AA, United Kingdom
    Dev Neurobiol 69:314-25. 2009
  9. doi request reprint The post-natal chemosensory environment induces epigenetic changes in vomeronasal receptor gene expression and a bias in olfactory preference
    Kevin D Broad
    Sub Dept of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge, Madingley, Cambridge, UK
    Behav Genet 42:461-71. 2012
  10. pmc Genomic imprinting mediates sexual experience-dependent olfactory learning in male mice
    William T Swaney
    Sub Department of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge, High Street, Madingley, Cambridge CB3 8AA, United Kingdom
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:6084-9. 2007

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications24

  1. doi request reprint Epigenetically regulated imprinted genes and foetal programming
    Eric B Keverne
    Sub Department of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge, Madingley, Cambridge, CB23 8AA, UK
    Neurotox Res 18:386-92. 2010
    ....
  2. doi request reprint Epigenetics, brain evolution and behaviour
    Eric B Keverne
    Sub Department of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge, Madingley, Cambridge, CB23 8AA, UK
    Front Neuroendocrinol 29:398-412. 2008
    ....
  3. doi request reprint Visualisation of the vomeronasal pheromone response system
    Eric B Keverne
    Subdepartment of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge, Madingley, Cambridge CB238AA, UK
    Bioessays 30:802-5. 2008
    ..A recent paper in Science by Ron Yu and colleagues addresses these issues by literally visualising patterns of activity in VNO slices and determining what information is common across different individuals and what distinguishes them...
  4. pmc Importance of the matriline for genomic imprinting, brain development and behaviour
    E B Keverne
    Sub Department of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge, Madingley, Cambridge CB23 8AA, UK
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 368:20110327. 2013
    ..This provides each generation with the same ability to make new adaptations while constrained by a transgenerational knowledge-based predisposition to preserve others...
  5. doi request reprint Monoallelic gene expression and mammalian evolution
    Barry Keverne
    Sub Department of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB23 8AA, UK
    Bioessays 31:1318-26. 2009
    ..Genomic imprinting pervades many aspects of mammalian growth and evolution but in particular has played a significant role in the co-adaptive evolution of the mother and foetus...
  6. ncbi request reprint Vasopressin, oxytocin and social behaviour
    Eric B Keverne
    Sub Department of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge, High Street, Madingley, Cambridge CB3 8AA, UK
    Curr Opin Neurobiol 14:777-83. 2004
    ..Male affiliative bonding depends upon release of both vasopressin and dopamine in the ventral striatum enhancing the reward value of odour cues that signal identity...
  7. doi request reprint The paternally expressed gene Peg3 regulates sexual experience-dependent preferences for estrous odors
    William T Swaney
    Sub Department of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
    Behav Neurosci 122:963-73. 2008
    ....
  8. doi request reprint Increased apoptosis during neonatal brain development underlies the adult behavioral deficits seen in mice lacking a functional paternally expressed gene 3 (Peg3)
    Kevin D Broad
    Sub Department of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge, Madingley, Cambridge, CB3 8AA, United Kingdom
    Dev Neurobiol 69:314-25. 2009
    ....
  9. doi request reprint The post-natal chemosensory environment induces epigenetic changes in vomeronasal receptor gene expression and a bias in olfactory preference
    Kevin D Broad
    Sub Dept of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge, Madingley, Cambridge, UK
    Behav Genet 42:461-71. 2012
    ..This may provide a mechanism by which environmental changes are able to modify the detection capabilities of the vomeronasal organ to respond optimally to the most likely social environment that a mouse will encounter when mature...
  10. pmc Genomic imprinting mediates sexual experience-dependent olfactory learning in male mice
    William T Swaney
    Sub Department of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge, High Street, Madingley, Cambridge CB3 8AA, United Kingdom
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:6084-9. 2007
    ....
  11. ncbi request reprint Urinary pheromones promote ERK/Akt phosphorylation, regeneration and survival of vomeronasal (V2R) neurons
    Jing Xia
    Laboratories of Molecular Neuroscience and Protein Technology, The Babraham Institute, Babraham, Cambridge, UK
    Eur J Neurosci 24:3333-42. 2006
    ..These data show that regenerating V2Rs respond to urine and the urinary peptides by activation of the Ras-ERK and PI3-Akt pathways, which appear to be important for vomeronasal neural survival and proliferation...
  12. pmc Coadaptation in mother and infant regulated by a paternally expressed imprinted gene
    James P Curley
    Sub Department of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge, Madingley, Cambridge CB3 8AA, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 271:1303-9. 2004
    ....
  13. doi request reprint Epigenetics and brain evolution
    Eric B Keverne
    Sub Department of Animal Behavior, University of Cambridge, Madingley, Cambridge CB23 8AA, UK
    Epigenomics 3:183-91. 2011
    ..This suggests an element of genetic stability between the brains of monkey and man with a greater emphasis on epigenetics providing adaptable variability...
  14. ncbi request reprint Something in the air? New insights into mammalian pheromones
    Peter A Brennan
    Sub Department of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge, High St, Madingley, Cambridge CB3 8AA, UK
    Curr Biol 14:R81-9. 2004
    ..Although the vomeronasal organ is often regarded as only a pheromone detector, evidence is emerging that suggests it might respond to a much broader variety of chemosignals...
  15. pmc Placental protection of the fetal brain during short-term food deprivation
    Kevin D Broad
    Sub Department of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB23 8AA, United Kingdom
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108:15237-41. 2011
    ..Thus, the fetus controls its own destiny in times of acute starvation by short-term sacrifice of the placenta to preserve brain development...
  16. ncbi request reprint Natural variations in postpartum maternal care in inbred and outbred mice
    Frances A Champagne
    Sub Department of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge, High Street, Madingley, CB3 8AA Cambridge United Kingdom
    Physiol Behav 91:325-34. 2007
    ..These variations represent strain specific strategies for promoting growth and survival of offspring during infancy that may also mediate "epigenetic" differences in phenotype in adulthood...
  17. pmc Understanding well-being in the evolutionary context of brain development
    Eric B Keverne
    Sub Department of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge, Madingley, Cambridge CB3 8AA, UK
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 359:1349-58. 2004
    ..This will provide the firm foundations on which to develop meaningful lifestyles and relationships that are crucial to well-being...
  18. ncbi request reprint Mammalian pheromones: from genes to behaviour
    Eric B Keverne
    Sub Department of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge, High Street, Madingley, Cambridge CB3 8AA, UK
    Curr Biol 12:R807-9. 2002
    ..This is not unexpected; less predictable is the finding that deleting the gene for a vomeronasal-organ-specific ion channel causes gender blindness...
  19. ncbi request reprint Pheromones, vomeronasal function, and gender-specific behavior
    Eric B Keverne
    Sub Department of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge, Madingley, CB3 8AA, Cambridge, United Kingdom
    Cell 108:735-8. 2002
    ..The striking behavioral phenotypes of mice lacking the TRP2 ion channel have highlighted the importance of the vomeronasal organ in gender-specific sexual behavior...
  20. pmc A possible role for imprinted genes in inbreeding avoidance and dispersal from the natal area in mice
    Anthony R Isles
    Sub Department of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge, Madingley, Cambridge CB3 8AA, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 269:665-70. 2002
    ....
  21. doi request reprint More to pheromones than meets the nose
    Kevin D Broad
    Nat Neurosci 11:128-9. 2008
  22. ncbi request reprint Brain evolution, chemosensory processing, and behavior
    Eric B Keverne
    Nutr Rev 62:S218-23; discussion S224-41. 2004
  23. ncbi request reprint Suppression of prolactin does not reduce infant care by parentally experienced male common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus)
    Rosamunde E A Almond
    Department of Psychology, University of Wisconsin, 1202 West Johnson Street, Madison, WI 53706, USA
    Horm Behav 49:673-80. 2006
    ..This study showed that experienced male marmosets can express paternal behaviour in the absence of the high prolactin levels normally seen after infants are born...
  24. ncbi request reprint Odor here, odor there: chemosensation and reproductive function
    Eric B Keverne
    Nat Neurosci 8:1637-8. 2005