E B Keverne

Summary

Affiliation: University of Cambridge
Country: UK

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Genomic imprinting in the brain
    E B Keverne
    Sub Department of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge Madingley, Cambridge, CB3 8AA, UK
    Curr Opin Neurobiol 7:463-8. 1997
  2. ncbi request reprint The vomeronasal organ
    E B Keverne
    Sub Department of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge, Madingley, Cambridge CB3 8AA, UK
    Science 286:716-20. 1999
  3. ncbi request reprint Mammalian pheromones: from genes to behaviour
    Eric B Keverne
    Sub Department of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge, High Street, Madingley, Cambridge CB3 8AA, UK
    Curr Biol 12:R807-9. 2002
  4. ncbi request reprint Pheromones, vomeronasal function, and gender-specific behavior
    Eric B Keverne
    Sub Department of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge, Madingley, CB3 8AA, Cambridge, United Kingdom
    Cell 108:735-8. 2002
  5. pmc Understanding well-being in the evolutionary context of brain development
    Eric B Keverne
    Sub Department of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge, Madingley, Cambridge CB3 8AA, UK
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 359:1349-58. 2004
  6. ncbi request reprint Genomic imprinting and the maternal brain
    E B Keverne
    Sub Department of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge, High Street, Madingley, Cambridge CB3 8AA, UK
    Prog Brain Res 133:279-85. 2001
  7. ncbi request reprint Importance of olfactory and vomeronasal systems for male sexual function
    E B Keverne
    Sub Department of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge, Madingley, Cambridge, CB3 8AA, UK
    Physiol Behav 83:177-87. 2004
  8. ncbi request reprint Isolation of mouse vomeronasal receptor genes and their co-localization with specific G-protein messenger RNAs
    H Saito
    Sub Department of Animal Behavior, Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Madingley, Cambridge CB3 8AA, UK
    Brain Res Mol Brain Res 60:215-27. 1998
  9. ncbi request reprint Regulation of maternal behavior and offspring growth by paternally expressed Peg3
    L Li
    Wellcome CRC Institute of Cancer and Developmental Biology, and Physiological Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge CB2 1QR, UK
    Science 284:330-3. 1999
  10. ncbi request reprint Analysis of imprinted murine Peg3 locus in transgenic mice
    Irene Y Y Szeto
    Wellcome Trust Cancer Research UK Institute of Cancer and Developmental Biology and Department of Physiology, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge, CB2, 1QR, UK
    Mamm Genome 15:284-95. 2004

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications40

  1. ncbi request reprint Genomic imprinting in the brain
    E B Keverne
    Sub Department of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge Madingley, Cambridge, CB3 8AA, UK
    Curr Opin Neurobiol 7:463-8. 1997
    ..Molecular genetics is providing insights into the complexity of these imprinting mechanisms, while experimental studies are revealing the differential roles that maternal and paternal genomes may play in brain development and growth...
  2. ncbi request reprint The vomeronasal organ
    E B Keverne
    Sub Department of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge, Madingley, Cambridge CB3 8AA, UK
    Science 286:716-20. 1999
    ..The areas of hypothalamus innervated regulate reproductive, defensive, and ingestive behavior as well as neuroendocrine secretion...
  3. ncbi request reprint Mammalian pheromones: from genes to behaviour
    Eric B Keverne
    Sub Department of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge, High Street, Madingley, Cambridge CB3 8AA, UK
    Curr Biol 12:R807-9. 2002
    ..This is not unexpected; less predictable is the finding that deleting the gene for a vomeronasal-organ-specific ion channel causes gender blindness...
  4. ncbi request reprint Pheromones, vomeronasal function, and gender-specific behavior
    Eric B Keverne
    Sub Department of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge, Madingley, CB3 8AA, Cambridge, United Kingdom
    Cell 108:735-8. 2002
    ..The striking behavioral phenotypes of mice lacking the TRP2 ion channel have highlighted the importance of the vomeronasal organ in gender-specific sexual behavior...
  5. pmc Understanding well-being in the evolutionary context of brain development
    Eric B Keverne
    Sub Department of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge, Madingley, Cambridge CB3 8AA, UK
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 359:1349-58. 2004
    ..This will provide the firm foundations on which to develop meaningful lifestyles and relationships that are crucial to well-being...
  6. ncbi request reprint Genomic imprinting and the maternal brain
    E B Keverne
    Sub Department of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge, High Street, Madingley, Cambridge CB3 8AA, UK
    Prog Brain Res 133:279-85. 2001
    ..The implications of these findings for brain evolution and maternal behavior are discussed...
  7. ncbi request reprint Importance of olfactory and vomeronasal systems for male sexual function
    E B Keverne
    Sub Department of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge, Madingley, Cambridge, CB3 8AA, UK
    Physiol Behav 83:177-87. 2004
    ....
  8. ncbi request reprint Isolation of mouse vomeronasal receptor genes and their co-localization with specific G-protein messenger RNAs
    H Saito
    Sub Department of Animal Behavior, Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Madingley, Cambridge CB3 8AA, UK
    Brain Res Mol Brain Res 60:215-27. 1998
    ....
  9. ncbi request reprint Regulation of maternal behavior and offspring growth by paternally expressed Peg3
    L Li
    Wellcome CRC Institute of Cancer and Developmental Biology, and Physiological Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge CB2 1QR, UK
    Science 284:330-3. 1999
    ..This study provides further insights on the evolution of epigenetic regulation of imprinted gene dosage in modulating mammalian growth and behavior...
  10. ncbi request reprint Analysis of imprinted murine Peg3 locus in transgenic mice
    Irene Y Y Szeto
    Wellcome Trust Cancer Research UK Institute of Cancer and Developmental Biology and Department of Physiology, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge, CB2, 1QR, UK
    Mamm Genome 15:284-95. 2004
    ..Concerning the expression of the Peg3 transgene, we detected appropriate expression in the adult brain. However, this was not sufficient to rescue the maternal behavior phenotype seen in Peg3 deficient animals...
  11. ncbi request reprint Paternal monoallelic expression of PEG3 in the human placenta
    S E Hiby
    Research Group in Human Reproductive Immunobiology, Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 1QP, UK
    Hum Mol Genet 10:1093-100. 2001
    ..By utilizing a polymorphism detected in exon 9, we have established that only the paternal allele is expressed in human placenta. Human PEG3 is therefore maternally imprinted as in mouse...
  12. ncbi request reprint Previous maternal experience potentiates the effect of parturition on oxytocin receptor mRNA expression in the paraventricular nucleus
    K D Broad
    Sub Dept of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge, Madingley, UK
    Eur J Neurosci 11:3725-37. 1999
    ....
  13. ncbi request reprint Conditional ablation of neurones in transgenic mice
    A R Isles
    Laboratory of Cognitive and Developmental Neuroscience, Neurobiology Programme, The Babraham Institute, Babraham, Cambridge, CB2 4AT, United Kingdom
    J Neurobiol 47:183-93. 2001
    ....
  14. ncbi request reprint Expression of olfactory receptors, G-proteins and AxCAMs during the development and maturation of olfactory sensory neurons in the mouse
    H Saito
    Sub Department of Animal Behaviour, Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Madingley, Cambridge CB3 8AA, UK
    Brain Res Dev Brain Res 110:69-81. 1998
    ..Moreover the highest periods of expression occur at post-natal day 7 when a proliferation of bulbar glomeruli are observed, suggesting the role of Big-2 to be primarily concerned with synaptogenesis...
  15. ncbi request reprint Low molecular weight constituents of male mouse urine mediate the pregnancy block effect and convey information about the identity of the mating male
    P Peele
    Sub Department of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge, High Street, Madingley, Cambridge, CB3 8AA, UK
    Eur J Neurosci 18:622-8. 2003
    ..In contrast, the low molecular weight fraction induced egr-1 expression in the mitral/tufted neurons in the anterior subregion of the accessory olfactory bulb, suggesting that they activate the V1R class of vomeronasal receptor neuron...
  16. pmc Mother-infant bonding and the evolution of mammalian social relationships
    K D Broad
    Sub Department of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge, Madingley, Cambridge CB3 8AA, UK
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 361:2199-214. 2006
    ....
  17. ncbi request reprint Genomic imprinting and the evolution of sex differences in mammalian reproductive strategies
    E B Keverne
    Sub Department of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge, Madingley, Cambridge, CB3 8AA, United Kingdom
    Adv Genet 59:217-43. 2007
    ..The epigenetic effects of social learning on brain development have become equally as important as the epigenetic effects of hormones on brain development and both contribute to sex differences in behavior in large-brained primates...
  18. ncbi request reprint Neural mechanisms of mammalian olfactory learning
    P A Brennan
    Sub Department of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge, Madingley, U K
    Prog Neurobiol 51:457-81. 1997
    ..Although these examples occur in highly specialized contexts, comparisons among them can enhance our understanding of the general neural mechanisms of olfactory learning...
  19. pmc Importance of the matriline for genomic imprinting, brain development and behaviour
    E B Keverne
    Sub Department of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge, Madingley, Cambridge CB23 8AA, UK
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 368:20110327. 2013
    ..This provides each generation with the same ability to make new adaptations while constrained by a transgenerational knowledge-based predisposition to preserve others...
  20. ncbi request reprint Genomic imprinting and the differential roles of parental genomes in brain development
    E B Keverne
    Sub Department of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge, Madingley, UK
    Brain Res Dev Brain Res 92:91-100. 1996
    ..In particular, genomic imprinting may have facilitated a rapid non-linear expansion of the brain, especially the cortex, during development over evolutionary time...
  21. ncbi request reprint Increased body fat in mice with a targeted mutation of the paternally expressed imprinted gene Peg3
    J P Curley
    Sub Department of Animal Behavior, University of Cambridge, Madingley, Cambridge, UK
    FASEB J 19:1302-4. 2005
    ..This mutation, which is strongly expressed in hypothalamic tissue during development, has the capacity to regulate multiple events relating to energy homeostasis...
  22. ncbi request reprint GABA-ergic neurons and the neurobiology of schizophrenia and other psychoses
    E B Keverne
    Sub Department of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge, UK
    Brain Res Bull 48:467-73. 1999
    ..These interneurons have highly divergent inhibitory projections to large numbers of pyramidal neurons and are themselves synchronised by the ascending dopamine and serotonin innervations...
  23. doi request reprint Epigenetics, brain evolution and behaviour
    Eric B Keverne
    Sub Department of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge, Madingley, Cambridge, CB23 8AA, UK
    Front Neuroendocrinol 29:398-412. 2008
    ....
  24. doi request reprint Visualisation of the vomeronasal pheromone response system
    Eric B Keverne
    Subdepartment of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge, Madingley, Cambridge CB238AA, UK
    Bioessays 30:802-5. 2008
    ..A recent paper in Science by Ron Yu and colleagues addresses these issues by literally visualising patterns of activity in VNO slices and determining what information is common across different individuals and what distinguishes them...
  25. ncbi request reprint Urinary pheromones promote ERK/Akt phosphorylation, regeneration and survival of vomeronasal (V2R) neurons
    Jing Xia
    Laboratories of Molecular Neuroscience and Protein Technology, The Babraham Institute, Babraham, Cambridge, UK
    Eur J Neurosci 24:3333-42. 2006
    ..These data show that regenerating V2Rs respond to urine and the urinary peptides by activation of the Ras-ERK and PI3-Akt pathways, which appear to be important for vomeronasal neural survival and proliferation...
  26. ncbi request reprint Vasopressin, oxytocin and social behaviour
    Eric B Keverne
    Sub Department of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge, High Street, Madingley, Cambridge CB3 8AA, UK
    Curr Opin Neurobiol 14:777-83. 2004
    ..Male affiliative bonding depends upon release of both vasopressin and dopamine in the ventral striatum enhancing the reward value of odour cues that signal identity...
  27. doi request reprint Increased apoptosis during neonatal brain development underlies the adult behavioral deficits seen in mice lacking a functional paternally expressed gene 3 (Peg3)
    Kevin D Broad
    Sub Department of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge, Madingley, Cambridge, CB3 8AA, United Kingdom
    Dev Neurobiol 69:314-25. 2009
    ....
  28. pmc Coadaptation in mother and infant regulated by a paternally expressed imprinted gene
    James P Curley
    Sub Department of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge, Madingley, Cambridge CB3 8AA, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 271:1303-9. 2004
    ....
  29. doi request reprint Epigenetically regulated imprinted genes and foetal programming
    Eric B Keverne
    Sub Department of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge, Madingley, Cambridge, CB23 8AA, UK
    Neurotox Res 18:386-92. 2010
    ....
  30. pmc Genomic imprinting mediates sexual experience-dependent olfactory learning in male mice
    William T Swaney
    Sub Department of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge, High Street, Madingley, Cambridge CB3 8AA, United Kingdom
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:6084-9. 2007
    ....
  31. doi request reprint The paternally expressed gene Peg3 regulates sexual experience-dependent preferences for estrous odors
    William T Swaney
    Sub Department of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
    Behav Neurosci 122:963-73. 2008
    ....
  32. ncbi request reprint Abnormal maternal behaviour and growth retardation associated with loss of the imprinted gene Mest
    L Lefebvre
    Wellcome CRC Institute of Cancer and Developmental Biology, Cambridge, UK
    Nat Genet 20:163-9. 1998
    ..Our results provide evidence for the involvement of an imprinted gene in the control of adult behaviour...
  33. pmc A possible role for imprinted genes in inbreeding avoidance and dispersal from the natal area in mice
    Anthony R Isles
    Sub Department of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge, Madingley, Cambridge CB3 8AA, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 269:665-70. 2002
    ....
  34. ncbi request reprint Something in the air? New insights into mammalian pheromones
    Peter A Brennan
    Sub Department of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge, High St, Madingley, Cambridge CB3 8AA, UK
    Curr Biol 14:R81-9. 2004
    ..Although the vomeronasal organ is often regarded as only a pheromone detector, evidence is emerging that suggests it might respond to a much broader variety of chemosignals...
  35. ncbi request reprint A novel splice variant of the cell adhesion molecule BIG-2 is expressed in the olfactory and vomeronasal neuroepithelia
    M L Mimmack
    Sub Department of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge, Madingley, UK
    Brain Res Mol Brain Res 47:345-50. 1997
    ..These results suggest that alternative splicing of the BIG-2 gene transcript may play an important role in the organization of the vomeronasal and olfactory neuroepithelia...
  36. ncbi request reprint Sex difference in attraction thresholds for volatile odors from male and estrous female mouse urine
    M J Baum
    Subdepartment of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB3 8AA, United Kingdom
    Horm Behav 41:213-9. 2002
    ....
  37. doi request reprint More to pheromones than meets the nose
    Kevin D Broad
    Nat Neurosci 11:128-9. 2008
  38. ncbi request reprint Brain evolution, chemosensory processing, and behavior
    Eric B Keverne
    Nutr Rev 62:S218-23; discussion S224-41. 2004
  39. ncbi request reprint Suppression of prolactin does not reduce infant care by parentally experienced male common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus)
    Rosamunde E A Almond
    Department of Psychology, University of Wisconsin, 1202 West Johnson Street, Madison, WI 53706, USA
    Horm Behav 49:673-80. 2006
    ..This study showed that experienced male marmosets can express paternal behaviour in the absence of the high prolactin levels normally seen after infants are born...
  40. ncbi request reprint Odor here, odor there: chemosensation and reproductive function
    Eric B Keverne
    Nat Neurosci 8:1637-8. 2005