Kristjan R Jessen

Summary

Affiliation: University College London
Country: UK

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Glial cells
    Kristjan R Jessen
    Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK
    Int J Biochem Cell Biol 36:1861-7. 2004
  2. pmc c-Jun reprograms Schwann cells of injured nerves to generate a repair cell essential for regeneration
    Peter J Arthur-Farraj
    Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, UK
    Neuron 75:633-47. 2012
  3. pmc c-Jun is a negative regulator of myelination
    David B Parkinson
    Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, England, UK
    J Cell Biol 181:625-37. 2008
  4. doi request reprint Negative regulation of myelination: relevance for development, injury, and demyelinating disease
    Kristjan R Jessen
    Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University College London, London, United Kingdom
    Glia 56:1552-65. 2008
  5. ncbi request reprint The origin and development of glial cells in peripheral nerves
    Kristjan R Jessen
    Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK
    Nat Rev Neurosci 6:671-82. 2005
  6. ncbi request reprint Why do Schwann cells survive in the absence of axons?
    K R Jessen
    Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, University College London, United Kingdom
    Ann N Y Acad Sci 883:109-15. 1999
  7. ncbi request reprint Origin and early development of Schwann cells
    K R Jessen
    Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, University College London, UK
    Microsc Res Tech 41:393-402. 1998
  8. pmc Embryonic Schwann cell development: the biology of Schwann cell precursors and early Schwann cells
    K R Jessen
    Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, University College London, UK
    J Anat 191:501-5. 1997
  9. pmc Krox-20 inhibits Jun-NH2-terminal kinase/c-Jun to control Schwann cell proliferation and death
    David B Parkinson
    Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, University College London, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT UK
    J Cell Biol 164:385-94. 2004
  10. pmc Notch controls embryonic Schwann cell differentiation, postnatal myelination and adult plasticity
    Ashwin Woodhoo
    Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University College London, UK
    Nat Neurosci 12:839-47. 2009

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications40

  1. ncbi request reprint Glial cells
    Kristjan R Jessen
    Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK
    Int J Biochem Cell Biol 36:1861-7. 2004
    ..Increasing body of evidence indicates that glial cells are essential regulators of the formation, maintenance and function of synapses, the key functional unit of the nervous system...
  2. pmc c-Jun reprograms Schwann cells of injured nerves to generate a repair cell essential for regeneration
    Peter J Arthur-Farraj
    Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, UK
    Neuron 75:633-47. 2012
    ..We conclude that a single glial transcription factor is essential for restoration of damaged nerves, acting to control the transdifferentiation of myelin and Remak Schwann cells to dedicated repair cells in damaged tissue...
  3. pmc c-Jun is a negative regulator of myelination
    David B Parkinson
    Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, England, UK
    J Cell Biol 181:625-37. 2008
    ..Negative regulation of myelination is likely to have significant implications for three areas of Schwann cell biology: the molecular analysis of plasticity, demyelinating pathologies, and the response of peripheral nerves to injury...
  4. doi request reprint Negative regulation of myelination: relevance for development, injury, and demyelinating disease
    Kristjan R Jessen
    Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University College London, London, United Kingdom
    Glia 56:1552-65. 2008
    ..In neuropathies, however, activation of these pathways is likely to be harmful because they may be key contributors to demyelination, a situation which would open new routes for clinical intervention...
  5. ncbi request reprint The origin and development of glial cells in peripheral nerves
    Kristjan R Jessen
    Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK
    Nat Rev Neurosci 6:671-82. 2005
    ..Embryonic nerves therefore offer a particular opportunity to analyse the early steps of gliogenesis from transient multipotent stem cells, and to understand how this process is integrated with organogenesis of peripheral nerves...
  6. ncbi request reprint Why do Schwann cells survive in the absence of axons?
    K R Jessen
    Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, University College London, United Kingdom
    Ann N Y Acad Sci 883:109-15. 1999
    ..These circuits are not present in Schwann cell precursors. We have identified insulin-like growth factor, neurotrophin-3 and platelet-derived growth factor-BB as components of the autocrine Schwann cell survival signal...
  7. ncbi request reprint Origin and early development of Schwann cells
    K R Jessen
    Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, University College London, UK
    Microsc Res Tech 41:393-402. 1998
    ..These include Oct-6, Krox-20, and Pax-3 but also members of the basic helix-loop-helix family, Sox 10, and the cAMP response element binding protein CREB...
  8. pmc Embryonic Schwann cell development: the biology of Schwann cell precursors and early Schwann cells
    K R Jessen
    Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, University College London, UK
    J Anat 191:501-5. 1997
    ..Axonal signals involving neuregulins are important regulators of these events, in particular of the survival, proliferation and differentiation of Schwann cell precursors...
  9. pmc Krox-20 inhibits Jun-NH2-terminal kinase/c-Jun to control Schwann cell proliferation and death
    David B Parkinson
    Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, University College London, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT UK
    J Cell Biol 164:385-94. 2004
    ..Krox-20 also up-regulates the scaffold protein JNK-interacting protein 1 (JIP-1). We propose this as a possible component of the mechanism by which Krox-20 regulates JNK activity during Schwann cell development...
  10. pmc Notch controls embryonic Schwann cell differentiation, postnatal myelination and adult plasticity
    Ashwin Woodhoo
    Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University College London, UK
    Nat Neurosci 12:839-47. 2009
    ..These findings are relevant for understanding the molecular mechanisms that control Schwann cell plasticity and underlie nerve pathology, including demyelinating neuropathies and tumorigenesis...
  11. ncbi request reprint A double point mutation in the DNA-binding region of Egr2 switches its function from inhibition to induction of proliferation: A potential contribution to the development of congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy
    Peter Arthur-Farraj
    Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK
    Neurobiol Dis 24:159-69. 2006
    ..Furthermore, mutant Egr2 upregulates cyclin D1 and reduces levels of the cell cycle inhibitor, p27. These observations add significant new evidence to explain how this mutation leads to congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy in humans...
  12. ncbi request reprint The structural and functional integrity of peripheral nerves depends on the glial-derived signal desert hedgehog
    Soheila Sharghi-Namini
    Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, United Kingdom
    J Neurosci 26:6364-76. 2006
    ..1999). The complexity of the defects raises a number of important questions about the Dhh-dependent cell-cell signaling network in peripheral nerves...
  13. ncbi request reprint TGFbeta type II receptor signaling controls Schwann cell death and proliferation in developing nerves
    Maurizio D'Antonio
    Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, United Kingdom
    J Neurosci 26:8417-27. 2006
    ..This is the first in vivo evidence for a growth factor receptor involved in promoting Schwann cell division during development and the first genetic evidence for a receptor that controls normal developmental Schwann cell death...
  14. doi request reprint Mouse schwann cells need both NRG1 and cyclic AMP to myelinate
    Peter Arthur-Farraj
    Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, United Kingdom
    Glia 59:720-33. 2011
    ..They demonstrate unambiguously the promyelin effects of NRG1 in purified cells, and they show that the cAMP pathway determines whether NRG1 drives proliferation or induces myelin differentiation...
  15. ncbi request reprint The trunk neural crest and its early glial derivatives: a study of survival responses, developmental schedules and autocrine mechanisms
    Ashwin Woodhoo
    Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, UK
    Mol Cell Neurosci 25:30-41. 2004
    ..They show that survival mechanisms among PNS glia differ early in development and that satellite cell development runs ahead of schedule compared to Schwann cells in several significant features...
  16. ncbi request reprint Identification and characterization of ZFP-57, a novel zinc finger transcription factor in the mammalian peripheral nervous system
    Maria B Duran Alonso
    Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, United Kingdom
    J Biol Chem 279:25653-64. 2004
    ..Zfp-57 mRNA is up-regulated in Schwann cells in response to leukemia inhibitory factor and fibroblast growth factor 2...
  17. ncbi request reprint Regulation of the myelin gene periaxin provides evidence for Krox-20-independent myelin-related signalling in Schwann cells
    David B Parkinson
    Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, University College London, Gower Street, UK
    Mol Cell Neurosci 23:13-27. 2003
    ..Thus the axonal signals responsible for myelination are only partially transduced in Schwann cells by mechanisms that depend on Krox-20...
  18. ncbi request reprint beta-Neuregulin and autocrine mediated survival of Schwann cells requires activity of Ets family transcription factors
    David B Parkinson
    Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, University College London, Gower Street, United Kingdom
    Mol Cell Neurosci 20:154-67. 2002
    ..These data demonstrate that distinct autocrine and beta-neuregulin survival signals converge in their requirement for Ets dependent transcription in Schwann cell survival...
  19. pmc p38 MAPK activation promotes denervated Schwann cell phenotype and functions as a negative regulator of Schwann cell differentiation and myelination
    David P Yang
    Department of Biological Sciences, Rutgers University, Newark, New Jersey 07102, USA
    J Neurosci 32:7158-68. 2012
    ..Altogether, our data identify p38 MAPK as an important regulator of Schwann cell plasticity and differentiation...
  20. doi request reprint Novel signals controlling embryonic Schwann cell development, myelination and dedifferentiation
    Rhona Mirsky
    Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University College London, London, UK
    J Peripher Nerv Syst 13:122-35. 2008
    ....
  21. ncbi request reprint Gene profiling and bioinformatic analysis of Schwann cell embryonic development and myelination
    Maurizio D'Antonio
    Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, University College London, London, United Kingdom
    Glia 53:501-15. 2006
    ....
  22. pmc c-Jun in Schwann cells promotes axonal regeneration and motoneuron survival via paracrine signaling
    Xavier Fontana
    Mammalian Genetics Laboratory, Cancer Research UK, London Research Institute, London, England, UK
    J Cell Biol 198:127-41. 2012
    ..These results reveal an unexpected function for c-Jun in SCs in response to axonal injury, and identify paracrine Ret signaling as an important mediator of c-Jun function in SCs during regeneration...
  23. ncbi request reprint Identification of transcriptionally regulated mRNAs from mouse Schwann cell precursors using modified RNA fingerprinting methods
    G Zoidl
    Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, University College London, United Kingdom
    J Neurosci Res 49:32-42. 1997
    ....
  24. ncbi request reprint A screen for mutations in zebrafish that affect myelin gene expression in Schwann cells and oligodendrocytes
    Natalia Kazakova
    Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK
    Dev Biol 297:1-13. 2006
    ..Timed application of the RA synthesis inhibitor DEAB to wild type embryos showed that RA signalling is required at least 48 h before the onset of myelin protein synthesis in both CNS and PNS...
  25. ncbi request reprint Schwann cell-derived Desert hedgehog controls the development of peripheral nerve sheaths
    E Parmantier
    Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, University College London, United Kingdom
    Neuron 23:713-24. 1999
    ..They also show that Schwann cell-derived signals can act as important regulators of nerve development...
  26. pmc Signals that determine Schwann cell identity
    K R Jessen
    Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, University College London, UK
    J Anat 200:367-76. 2002
    ..Ongoing gene screening experiments are likely to reveal new genes of interest in this system...
  27. ncbi request reprint Transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta) mediates Schwann cell death in vitro and in vivo: examination of c-Jun activation, interactions with survival signals, and the relationship of TGFbeta-mediated death to Schwann cell differentiation
    D B Parkinson
    Department of Anatomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, United Kingdom
    J Neurosci 21:8572-85. 2001
    ....
  28. ncbi request reprint Schwann cells as regulators of nerve development
    Rhona Mirsky
    Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, University College London, Gower Street, WC1E 6BT, London, UK
    J Physiol Paris 96:17-24. 2002
    ..Schwann cells thus signal not only to themselves but also to the other cellular components within the nerve to act as major regulators of nerve development...
  29. ncbi request reprint Schwann cell-derived desert hedgehog signals nerve sheath formation
    R Mirsky
    Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, University College London, United Kingdom
    Ann N Y Acad Sci 883:196-202. 1999
    ....
  30. ncbi request reprint Helix-loop-helix proteins in Schwann cells: a study of regulation and subcellular localization of Ids, REB, and E12/47 during embryonic and postnatal development
    H J Stewart
    Department of Anatomy, University College London, United Kingdom
    J Neurosci Res 50:684-701. 1997
    ..These data indicate that HLH transcription factors act as regulators of Schwann cell development and point to the existence of as yet unidentified cell type-specific bHLH proteins in these cells...
  31. ncbi request reprint The neurobiology of Schwann cells
    R Mirsky
    Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, University College London, UK
    Brain Pathol 9:293-311. 1999
    ..Finally, the relationship between selected extracellular matrix components, integrins and the cytoskeleton is explored and related to disease...
  32. ncbi request reprint Schwann cell development, differentiation and myelination
    R Mirsky
    Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, University College London, UK
    Curr Opin Neurobiol 6:89-96. 1996
    ..The tetraspan group has emerged as a set of proteins with prominent functions in Schwann cell biology...
  33. ncbi request reprint A brief look at glial cells
    Kristjan R Jessen
    Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, University College London, UK
    Novartis Found Symp 276:5-14; discussion 54-7, 275-81. 2006
    ....
  34. ncbi request reprint Neural development. Fate diverted
    K R Jessen
    Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, University College London, UK
    Curr Biol 4:824-7. 1994
    ..Signals that alter cell fate are probably crucial in metazoan development. Glial growth factor may play such a role in the mammalian neural crest, by regulating the generation of neurons and Schwann cells...
  35. ncbi request reprint Schwann cell precursors: a favourable cell for myelin repair in the Central Nervous System
    A Woodhoo
    Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, University College London, London, UK
    Brain 130:2175-85. 2007
    ....
  36. ncbi request reprint In early development of the rat mRNA for the major myelin protein P(0) is expressed in nonsensory areas of the embryonic inner ear, notochord, enteric nervous system, and olfactory ensheathing cells
    M J Lee
    Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, University College London, London, United Kingdom
    Dev Dyn 222:40-51. 2001
    ..It remains to be determined whether this is functionally significant, or whether it is an evolutionary relic, perhaps reflecting ancestral use of P(0) as an adhesion molecule...
  37. ncbi request reprint Novel method for studying myelination in vivo reveals that EDTA is a potent inhibitor of myelin protein and mRNA expression during development of the rat sciatic nerve
    Stathis Meintanis
    Department of Biochemistry, Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology, Hellenic Pasteur Institute, 115 21 Athens, Greece
    Glia 48:132-44. 2004
    ....
  38. ncbi request reprint Denervated Schwann cells attract macrophages by secretion of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in a process regulated by interleukin-6 and LIF
    George K Tofaris
    Cambridge Centre for Brain Repair and Department of Neurology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 2PY, United Kingdom
    J Neurosci 22:6696-703. 2002
    ..They also provide evidence for an autocrine-signaling cascade involving IL-6, LIF, and MCP-1, which amplifies the Schwann cell-derived chemotactic signals gradually, in agreement with the delayed entry of macrophages to injured nerves...
  39. ncbi request reprint Desert hedgehog-patched 2 expression in peripheral nerves during Wallerian degeneration and regeneration
    Sepideh N Bajestan
    Department of Neurology and Geriatrics, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima, Japan
    J Neurobiol 66:243-55. 2006
    ..These results suggest that the Dhh-Ptc2 signaling pathway may be involved in the maintenance of adult nerves and may be one of the factors that directly or indirectly determines the response of peripheral nerves to injury...